In Review
First Week of April 1872-2002

140 Years Ago (1872):  The Village Board has appointed Mr. W. F. Williams Street Commissioner and Fire
Warden.  Mr. Williams did the business so well the two previous years, in keeping our streets in repair that the
Board very considerately concluded to continue his services.  Increasing his duties to the inspection of fire
apparatuses, chimneys, &c., is a timely and judicious move, and we know of no one who will attend it it more
faithfully and promptly than Mr. Williams.

130 Years Ago (1882):  George T. Prichard, Janesville, has just completed a job of steam fitting for Mr. L. T. Pullen,
banker.  The job is pronounced first class, and works like a charm.  Mr. Prichard has also closed a contract with the
school board of Evansville, to renovate and perfect the heating apparatus of the high school building.  He can do it
if anyone can.

120 Years Ago (1892):  Mr. Frank Woodbury is just in receipt of a beautiful silver, gold trimmed $60 E flat alto horn,
from Conn of Elkhart, Ind., said to be the best manufactory in the U. S.   It is a beauty and no mistake.

110 Years Ago (1902):  Total number of votes cast in the City election, 537:  Mayor, Perry C. Wilder; City
Treasurer, George L. Pullen, 471; City Clerk, Jonathan H. Potter, 475; Assessor, Homer Potter, 459; Chief of
police, Calvert C. Broughton, 265; Street Commissioner, Henry W. Hamilton, 341; Police Justice, Charles W.
Lowery, 455; Justice of the Peace, Fred L. Janes; Justice of the Peace, Charles W. Lowery, 457.  This is the
greatest number of ballots ever cast in this city, the next greatest being at the last presidential election when there
were 525.  

100 Years Ago (1912):  About noon Monday, the world quickly passed throughout the city and country that Doctor
Charles M. Smith, Sr. had been called to the beyond.  He was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, June 25,
1834 and lived in the place of his birth until twenty years of age.  In 1854 he came to Wisconsin.  When the school
at Dayton was organized he was chosen as the first teacher.  He afterward taught two terms in the Evansville
school.  Dr. Smith first read medicine with Dr. Evans, later attending and graduating from Rush Medical College in
1860.  He was appointed assistant surgeon to the 13th Wis. V. I. in which position he served throughout the war.  
Dr. Smith married Julia Sawin, May 16, 1861.  For forty-seven years they have made their home in Evansville.  
Besides the widow, Dr. Smith leaves two sisters, Mrs. C. M. Pullen of Canon City, Colo. and Mrs. Chas Ramsey of
Cattaraugus, New York, and one daughter, Mrs. Flora Gordon of Lodi, and one son, Dr. C. M. Smith, Jr., of
Evansville

90 Years Ago (1922):  The children of the Butts Corner School received a number of prizes at the Janesville
Gazette Bird House Contest held last week.  The houses were of rustic design fashioned of twigs and bark.  They
received the following prizes in the rural school division:  1st prize, $5, Glenn Maas; 2nd prize $3, Robert
Templeton; 3rd prize, $2, Ralph Maas; and $1 honor prizes, Kenneth Woodstock, Donald Turner, Peter Templeton.

80 Years Ago (1932):  A total of 85 vagrants were locked up in the city jail here during the month of March and two
suspicious persons were given hours or in other words ordered out of the city, according to the monthly report of
Chief of Police Fred Gillman.  That the number of vagrants locked up here is increasing every month is shown by
the fact that local police put 68 vagrants in the “Jug” during the month of December, 59 in January and 72 in
February.  

70 Years Ago (1942):  Letters from Evansville soldiers who left for the Philippine Islands last November, have
recently been received here by Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hubbard, Miss Jeanette Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Durner.  
Robert Hubbard wrote to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard and to Miss Smith on January 18 and the
communications reached here last Saturday.  Mr. and Mrs. Durner received their letter Monday from their son,
Corporal Herbert Durner, who wrote on January 10.  He stated that the Evansville soldiers are safe.  All the letters
had been censored by army officers but no parts of them had been blacked out.

60 Years Ago (1952):  Harley Reese, son of Mrs. Byron Reese, was chosen king of the 1952 Evansville junior
promenade by his classmates at a meeting of the group held Friday at the high school.  Harley has chosen Beverly
Thornton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Thornton, as queen.  The pair will reign at the prom to be held in the
school gym Saturday night, May 3.

50 Years Ago (1962):  In a record spring election vote Tuesday Mayor Brown defeated Donald Biely, opposing
candidate and R. B. Townsend, write-in candidate for the office of city mayor for the next two years.  Brown polled
399 votes to Townsend’s 382 and Biely’s 48.  The advisory referendum concerning the city joining with the Board of
Education in constructing a fallout shelter in the new high school building to be erected this summer resulted in 586
against the shelter and 239 for the shelter.  The second referendum on whether or not to remove the parking
meters in the city polled a vote of 451 voting to keep the meters and 381 to remove them.

40 Years Ago (1972):  Wilson Brown, Evansville citizen who resides at 308 Grove St. in the city’s first ward, won the
nod from local voters to serve as mayor for the next two years.  The mayoral post is not new to Brown who had
served several terms previously.  Now retired from General Motors, Brown had thrown his hat in the ring for another
shot at heading up the city government after several defeats in recent elections and turned the tide this time.  In a
three-way race Brown received 568 votes, Mrs. Ida Conroy, incumbent, 412 and Francis Erbs, postal employee,
220.  Mrs. Conroy was bidding for her fourth straight two-year term.

30 Years Ago (1982):  A 36 x 100 foot barn on County Trunk M, belonging to Norman Krumwiede blew down about
4 p.m. Tuesday, March 20.  The collapsed barn destroyed a grain drill, hay stacker and two cultivators.  

20 Years Ago (1992):  Richard Krake, art instructor at Evansville High School, has been awarded the prestigious
Kohl Teacher fellowship Award.  Each year the Herb Kohl Educational Foundation recognizes 100 teachers in the
state of Wisconsin for superior ability to inspire a love of learning and positive contributions to school and
community.  In addition to being an exemplary art instructor, Rich has been instrumental in developing and
promoting the Student Assistance Program and the Power of Positive Students program.  Rich also serves as
advisor to the school council and as an alderman on the Evansville City Council.

10 years ago (2002):  Nancy Greve accepted her prize for Grand Champion chili at the ECP 2nd annual Chili Cook-
off.  The Grand prize was $50 and a trophy bowl by Matthias James.  Honorable mention went to Dale Bryant and
People’s Choice went to David Sobeski.  

In Review
Second Week of April 1872-2002

140 Years Ago (1872):  Well Deserved.  We notice by our exchanges from Madison, the formation of a new law
partnership between Mr. Alden S. Sanborn and Mr. Burr W. Jones.  Mr. Jones had resided in this place up to the
time of his entering the University, at Madison, from which he graduated in the class of 1870. He is a close student,
and the future marks well a brilliant prospect of success.  His many friends in this place will be pleased to learn of
his successful commencement in his chosen profession.

130 Years Ago (1882):  Rev. E. Robinson, who spent the past winter in Florida, returned Wednesday p.m.  He is
looking quite well and says he is feeling quite as well as usual.  He says it looks good to get back to Evansville and
see familiar faces again.

120 Years Ago (1892):  On the way to our office Friday morning we met E. F. Ellis with an armful of stakes and a
boy carrying an ax, on their way to stake out a lot and locate a house.  He has bought the second lot south of Mr.
McCoy, on First Street for which he paid $200, and on which he is making preparations to build a nice residence.  
John Winston is making the frames and will take charge of the building.  [Edward F. Ellis’ house was at 326 South
First Street.]

110 Years Ago (1902):  Last Thursday, Col. G. W. Hall shipped from this city about $7,000 worth of animals and
received about $10,000 including the monster elephant called Columbus, which he bought of Ringling Bros., and is
said to be the largest elephant in the world, weighing twenty tons.

100 Years Ago (1912):  The city went strong for La Follette in the presidential primary ballot, giving him a majority
of 101 over Taft.

90 Years Ago (1922):  Last Monday afternoon, while assisting in putting a barrel of vinegar down into the basement
of his store, Art Cain, who recently purchased the W. J. Clarke store had the misfortune to get in front of the barrel,
as it slipped from the grasp of those above.  The sharp edge of the barrel struck his ankle, pinning it against the
stone wall and breaking it.  He was at once given the best medical attention, but will be laid up for several weeks.

80 Years Ago (1932):  With the organization of the Rock River Valley league and an abundance of material for a
championship team in Evansville, unusual interest is being manifested here in high school baseball this spring.  A
total of 45 candidates answered Coach Finstad’s call for practice last week.  Six were lettermen and 12 were
veterans.  The tentative line-ups for this year’s team will probably include Leo McCaffrey and Leslie Gilbertson as
catchers; Ben Hubbard, Wilmer Janes, Stanley Sperry, Cliff Fellows, and Ronald Brown as pitchers; Ken Cain,
Royalton Blunt, and Thayer Lutz, first base; Clifford Eastman, Don Miller and Floyd Main, second base; Robert and
Phil Smith, short stop; and Stanley Sperry and Lowell Thompson, third base.  The outfielders will include Cliff
Fellows, Bob Cain, Marvin Janes, Duane Knutson, Gilman Spersrud, George Howard, Harry Keehn, Kenneth Allen,
Stanley Hatlevig, Harold Jones, Harold Rasmussen, William Park and Leroy Scoville.  

70 Years Ago (1942):  Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Gooch, Madison, parents of Mrs. Thomas McPherson, Evansville, will
celebrate their Golden wedding anniversary, which occurs next Tuesday.  An open house in the Red Brick school
house two miles east of Footville will be held on Sunday, April 19.  Four generations of the Gooch family, including
H. B. Gooch, have received their early education in the school house.  The couple has five children, Mrs.
McPherson, Evansville; Mrs. Leila Nehmer and Louis Gooch, Madison; Mrs. Bona Bickel, Footville, and George
Gooch, Denver, Colorado.  A daughter died in infancy and a son, Henry Gooch, was killed in France during the first
World war.  

60 Years Ago (1952):  Warren Wickersham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Don Wickersham was the runner-up in the state
spelling contest held Saturday in Madison.  He was beaten by a Madison girl when he was unable to spell
“eucalyptus” and she spelled it correctly.  Warren, who is 14 years old and an 8th grade pupil in the city school
here is to be congratulated upon his spelling ability.

50 Years Ago (1962):  Mr. and Mrs. Neil Libby have rented the late Miss Lillian Gibbs apartment.  Libby will be in
the Arnold Willis Drug Store serving his apprenticeship.

40 Years Ago (1972):  V. Leslie Giles, 71, Evansville, died unexpectedly at home Tuesday, April 11, of an apparent
heart attack.  Mr. Giles was an auto mechanics for many years, employed by the Chevrolet Garage in Evansville.  
He was a member of the local volunteer fire department from 1929 to 1953 and was chief for several years.  
Surviving are his wife, Ruth; three sons, William of Tulsa, Okla., Kenneth of Cleveland, Ohio, and Ronald of
Jefferson; two daughters, Mrs. Lois Ellis, Ripon and Mrs. Betty Kanies, Louisville, Ky.; 12 grandchildren; a brother,
Orlo, of Reedsburg, and a sister, Mrs. George Dell, Evansville.  

30 Years Ago (1982):  On Palm Sunday, Rev. I. Dean Jordan announced to his congregation at the United
Methodist Church, that he was resigning and accepting a call to the United Methodist church at East Troy.  Rev.
Jordan and family came to Evansville in 1971 from Shawano.  He has completed one three year term on the
Evansville School Board and served 10 years on the Evansville Housing Authority.  Jordan also served on the
Health Planning Assn. for seven years.  Rev. Jordan has served the Orfordville united Methodist Church for 5 years
and for the past four years he has also been the pastor of the Peace United Methodist Church.  

20 Years Ago (1992):  Harlin Miller, squeaked out a win by nine votes and was certified the winner of the Mayoral
election held on Tuesday of last week.  The decision followed a recount held on Saturday to which mayoral
candidate Richard Modaff was entitled, having filed a petition for the recount.  

10 years ago (2002):  Evansville Energy Initiative Committee, consisting of key community leaders met with
government leaders and Wisconsin Focus on Energy this past Thursday at the State Capitol to sign a
memorandum of understanding.  This signing was to formalize a commitment of collaboration in development and
implementation of a community–wide energy plan for the greater Evansville area.  Evansville’s school district was
instrumental in beginning an energy program when it included in its building plans, geothermal heating/cooling and
solar power.  Since the formation of the Energy Initiative several businesses have gone through energy audits and
area contractors/builders have attending meetings to learn about programs available to become Energy Star
Homes.

In Review
Third Week of April 1872-2002

140 Years Ago (1872):  While our “city fathers” are casting their eyes about for needed repairs and improvements
of walks, &c., we would suggest a peep at the old rickety, narrow walk leading down the South side of Main st., to
the Depot; it is most used of any, yet the narrowest, and where lined with hitching posts, is nearly always covered
with horse’s heads, to the infinite annoyance of pedestrians.

130 Years Ago (1882):  About 4,000 sheep were fed and sold in this town the past winter.  The principal sales were
Hubbard Bros., 1,000; Gillies Bros., 1,500; Johnson and Child, 850; S. H. Frost, 125; J. Bullard, 600.  Prices ranged
from $4.50 to $5.25 per cwt., which was not high considering the price of feed.

120 Years Ago (1892):  Mr. Arthur Franklin, of Cooksville, ships three car loads of very fine fat cattle from this
station and Mr. John Wall, of Union, ships two car loads on the same train.

110 Years Ago (1902):  The water has been let out of Lake Leota and the boys and men have had great times
catching fish, of which large quantities have been captured even with the hands in the low water, and everybody in
town and the surrounding country are enjoying a nice mess of fresh fish; but it is a bad job for this city to lose this
beautiful body of water, and the only one of any use in this vicinity.

100 Years Ago (1912):  The D. E. Wood Butter Company are erecting a new smoke stack to be 85 feet high when
completed.  This will make the city look more like a manufacturing and business center.  [Note:  The D. E. Wood
Butter Company was located on the east side of Enterprise Street in the building now owned by Baker
Manufacturing and used as their educational center.]

90 Years Ago (1922):  Mr. Dave Dewey, of Malta, Illinois, and Miss Cora Taggart, of this city, were united in
marriage at Sycamore, Ill., last Thursday afternoon.  The bride is Miss Cora Taggart, one of the well known Taggart
twins, (Pinkey), as she has been always known to her friends, to distinguish her from her sister, (Bluey), and is a
daughter of Mr. George C. Taggart, of this city, having been raised and educated in Evansville where she has
many friends who will wish her well.

80 Years Ago (1932):  Evansville is now one of the main cities on Highway 13 from Beloit, on the southern state
line, to Ashland on the north.  Evansville motorists will need to be careful hereafter in the mention of the highways
13 and 92.  According to the new maps, highway 13 between Janesville and Evansville has been changed to No. 92
and highway 92 between Evansville and Beloit has been given the number 13.  Highway 13 has thus been made
into a state-wide highway leading from Beloit to Ashland.  Highway 92, as now routed on the new maps, runs from
Janesville to Evansville by way of present highway 13.  It follows 13 to a point one mile east of Brooklyn where it
turns left through Brooklyn and Belleville to Mount Horeb.   As soon as the bridges are completed on county trunk
M north of Union, highway 59 will be routed from Evansville north to Union instead of east to Cooksville.  It will join
county trunk M at Union leading north and east to Cooksville where it will connect with its former location at
Cooksville church and continue east to Edgerton.  

70 Years Ago (1942):  Postmaster Roy Reckord announced this morning that Elmer B. Johnson, representative of
the 7th Civil Service District Office, will be in Evansville Friday to interview stenographers and typists who may be
qualified and who desire to take examinations for those positions.  Miss Lois Baker, Washington, D. C. will be here
to conduct and rate examinations.  Individuals who qualify will have opportunity to receive immediate appointments.  

60 Years Ago (1952):  Members of St. Paul’s Catholic church will greet their new pastor, the Rev. Francis Doherty,
and bid farewell to Msgr. Edward Kinney who has been named rector of St. Raphael’s cathedral in Madison.  Father
Doherty comes to Evansville from Doylestown where he was pastor for four years.  Msgr. Kinney has been pastor of
the church here 14 months, succeeding the late Rev. Francis Mehigan.  

50 Years Ago (1962):  Construction of the new Evansville high school started this week after the board of
Education opened and approved bids for the building project.  Pem Associates, Inc. of Milwaukee was the
successful low bidder for the general construction at $545,495.  Other successful bidders were the Wilmer
Company, of Beloit, painting and decorating $23,430, O. L. Bradley, Janesville, plumbing, $45,450; Nitte-Barker
co., Beloit, heating and ventilating, $91,650; and Westphal Electric Company, Janesville, electrical work for $79,480
The total construction bids amounted to $775,525, or approximately $12.60 per square foot for slightly over 60,000
square feet of new building space.

40 Years Ago (1972):  Erosion control was the subject Monday night in Evansville, as farmers from the upper Allens
Creek watershed met with the Soil Conservation Service and the Agriculture Stabilization Committee Service at the
City Hall to find out what could be done to stop the erosion of Allens Creek which is filling in Lake Leota.  The
farmers are in agreement that something should be done and federal cost sharing is being applied for.  The stream
bank stabilization is the first step that has to be taken for a new and long lasting Lake Leota.  A rough estimate of
the project from the mouth of Lake Leota to the Evansville Brooklyn Road is $12,000.   From 75% to 80% of this
could be federally funded.

30 Years Ago (1982):  In the school board race, incumbent Mary Abey topped the voting with 833 votes, followed
by Roberta Van Galder with 632 votes and Wayne Wilson with 626 votes, to acquire the three school board
vacancies in Evansville.  

20 Years Ago (1992):  Columbia Chapter No. 29, of Evansville, celebrated its 100th anniversary on Sunday, March
29, at the Masonic Temple in Evansville.  Gladys Petersen was in charge of the celebration and gave a welcome to
the guests.  The Chapter was instituted on February 13, 1892, with thirty-three charter members.  Gwen Everill,
Evansville and Viola Tomlin, Lodi, were introduced as Columbia’s 50 year members present.

10 years ago (2002):  During the April 10th discovering Youth Arts meeting, Shelley Bisch was honored with a
special plaque in appreciation for her dedicated service to the youth of Evansville.  Shelley has volunteered her
time over the last year to organize and coach the 8th grade Spirit Team.  In addition she organized several fund
raisers to assist the girls with their uniform costs.  Her dedication to the promotion positive attitudes, cooperation
and respect among the youth of our community is truly commendable.

In Review
Fourth Week of April 1872-2002

140 Years Ago (1872):  We hear the question of another bridge across the stream, being agitated as among things
of the growing wants of our place, especially with those whose daily business calls them at the depot, living on the
west side and south of Main street.  Church street is open both sides of the stream, and no means of crossing,
save upon a log which some public spirited person has thrown across.  The street strikes directly at the head of the
depot, and if a bridge was thrown across, it would be one of the pleasantest thoroughfares in town.  It is the only
street that affords full view of the churches, Seminary, and public school buildings.  The value of property would not
only be enhanced, but would give a choice of means to reach and depart from the depot.

130 Years Ago (1882):  Horace Mower, a carpenter by trade, 32 years old, was run over a freight train Monday
night about two miles south of Magnolia station, at what is called Strong’s crossing, and killed.  He had both legs cut
entirely off below the knee, his right arm taken off below the elbow and the left side of his head smashed.  Life was
evidently extinct in a moment.  In his pocket was found a bottle filled with liquor; in another pocket was found a
bottle that probably contained the same stuff, but broken.  He leaves a wife and two children.

120 Years Ago (1892):  Friday April 29th, has been appointed as Arbor Day for this year.  The High School and
Seminary together with the citizens of Evansville will celebrate the day by some excellent and appropriate exercises
at the park.  It is to be hoped that the inauguration of the celebration of this day will be the occasion of a rousing
attendance at the exercises.  

110 Years Ago (1902):  Having secured a deal with Mr. Frank Gibbs of North Main St., whereby he is to furnish me
pure jersey milk, having purchased a number of cows for my special trade.  Many of them direct descendents of the
great World’s Fair Cow, Brown Bessie.  I am now prepared to furnish the public a better grade of milk than ever
before.  A visit to Mr. Gibbs’ here will fully convince you that he has the finest herd of Jersey cows in this county.  A.
M. Hungerford, Milk Man.

100 Years Ago (1912):  Last Friday morning the word quickly passed throughout the business portion of the town
that William Meggott was dead.  A number of the public buildings of the city will serve as his monuments.  He
superintended the erection of the Grange store building, the Eager block, occupied by the Economy store, the
Eager library and drew the plans for the Catholic Church.  For the last few years, he has been proprietor of the
Commercial House where he built up a large business by his good natured and courteous treatment of all.  The
funeral was held from the home.  Besides the widow, Ella Cassody Meggott, there is left one child, little Eunice, the
mother, Mrs. Lucy Walker Meggott and sister of Janesville.  The burial was in Maple Hill cemetery.

90 Years Ago (1922):  The Masons of this city began work on their property purchased last year from the Dr. Evans
estate, for the use of a Temple for the order and its auxiliaries here.  The first work done was yesterday when a
number of members who are proficient in the use of the axe and shovels held a bee and cut down fifteen or twenty
of the large trees on the property which are in the road of the building operations which will commence shortly.  It is
the intention to tear down the entire north wing and rebuild it much larger.  The hall for lodge work, etc, will be in the
upper story of this new building, while the lower part of this building will be fitted with new ranges and dining room
furniture, everything being new and modern.  It is expected that before the building is completed that in the
neighborhood of $30,000 will be expended.

80 Years Ago (1932):  Competing with representatives from four high schools, Evelyn Lay, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. James Lay, 15 West Liberty street, won first place in extemporaneous reading at a district forensic meet held
last Thursday night in Darien.  In the oratorical contest with six schools sending representatives, Kenneth Ellis, son
of Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Ellis, 111 West Liberty street, won second place.  The title of his oration was “What is a Good
Man.”

70 Years Ago (1942):  Miss Lou Howland’s piano students will present the annual spring piano recital in the
Methodist church auditorium.  Among those who will appear on the program are:  Helen Halstead, Barbara Conroy,
Patsy Conroy, Ellen Rasmussen, Anne Guilfoyle, Anne Louise Giese, Virginia Johnson, Geraldine Nance, Robert
Kelly, Joyce Meredith, Joanne Green, Donna Green, Arlene Andrus, Gloria Nagler, Mary Alice Tullis, Anne Fellows,
Betty Giles and Lois Giles.  

60 Years Ago (1952):  Mr. and Mrs. William Dixon were honored Saturday night at a farewell party given in the VFW
club rooms by the post and the auxiliary.  Mr. Dixon left Wednesday for Tucson, Ariz., where he plans to locate.  
Mrs. Dixon and children will leave for Tucson after school closes.  Gordon Hartin has accepted the position in the
Sperry Barber shop made vacant by Mr. Dixon’s going to Arizona.

50 Years Ago (1962):  Fire of undetermined origin completely destroyed a 20 x 40 ft. old frame building on the new
high school campus formerly known as the old fairgrounds.  When Evansville was host to the Rock County fair the
building was used for a display of fine arts.  During the past several years it has been used for storage only and at
the present time the only items in the structure were a few pieces of track equipment owned by the high school and
some pheasant waterers and feeders owned by the Rock County Pheasant Association.  The Evansville fire co.
responded to the call promptly but was unable to save the building or its contents.

40 Years Ago (1972):  Final rehearsals are being held this week for the Evansville Community Theater spring place
“Me and Thee” to be presented on Saturday and Sunday nights, April 29 and 30 in the South First Street School
Auditorium.  Those in the cast are:  Mrs. Robert Wood, Mrs. Larry Olson, Mrs. Gary Hurtley, Mark Hubacher, Jeffrey
Luchsinger and Rod Davis.  Claude Willoughby is the director.  Mark Bruce is stage manager and set designer.

30 Years Ago (1982):  Monday morning, April 19, the Union Coop began work on their 1 ½ million dollar grain
elevator and corn drier just off County Trunk M south of the railroad tracks.  The cement elevator will hold
4750,000 bushels of grain.  It is designed for high speed rapid handling.  A semi can be loaded in four to six
minutes.  Dave Fellows, President of the Union Coop, turned the first shovel of earth at the ground breaking,
followed by John Morning.  Each of the directors took their turn.  

20 Years Ago (1992):  Recently Wisconsin Power and Light Foundation presented a check in the amount of $150
to Evansville to purchase trees for the city.  It was back in 1988 that former mayor Chris Eager started the
restoration program in the city, when he began his first term as mayor.  On Tuesday night, the council approved
$350 to go towards this fund.  Other donations were from the Evansville Jaycees, the Grove Society, Dr. Doug
Batty, Hagen Insurance, the Lions Club, Nelson Young Lumber, Union Bank & Trust Co., Star Printing and Magee
Construction.  

10 years ago (2002):  Evansville E.M.S. received a check in the amount of $22,000 from the Mabel Apfel estate.  
Presenting the check and carrying out Mabel’s wishes are her niece and her husband, Doris and Art Olsen,
Evansville.  Mabel Apfel was a very caring and quiet person and a life-time resident of Evansville for over 60 years.  



In Review
Fourth Week of April 1872-2002

140 Years Ago (1872):  We hear the question of another bridge across the stream, being agitated as among things
of the growing wants of our place, especially with those whose daily business calls them at the depot, living on the
west side and south of Main street.  Church street is open both sides of the stream, and no means of crossing,
save upon a log which some public spirited person has thrown across.  The street strikes directly at the head of the
depot, and if a bridge was thrown across, it would be one of the pleasantest thoroughfares in town.  It is the only
street that affords full view of the churches, Seminary, and public school buildings.  The value of property would not
only be enhanced, but would give a choice of means to reach and depart from the depot.

130 Years Ago (1882):  Horace Mower, a carpenter by trade, 32 years old, was run over a freight train Monday
night about two miles south of Magnolia station, at what is called Strong’s crossing, and killed.  He had both legs cut
entirely off below the knee, his right arm taken off below the elbow and the left side of his head smashed.  Life was
evidently extinct in a moment.  In his pocket was found a bottle filled with liquor; in another pocket was found a
bottle that probably contained the same stuff, but broken.  He leaves a wife and two children.

120 Years Ago (1892):  Friday April 29th, has been appointed as Arbor Day for this year.  The High School and
Seminary together with the citizens of Evansville will celebrate the day by some excellent and appropriate exercises
at the park.  It is to be hoped that the inauguration of the celebration of this day will be the occasion of a rousing
attendance at the exercises.  

110 Years Ago (1902):  Having secured a deal with Mr. Frank Gibbs of North Main St., whereby he is to furnish me
pure jersey milk, having purchased a number of cows for my special trade.  Many of them direct descendents of the
great World’s Fair Cow, Brown Bessie.  I am now prepared to furnish the public a better grade of milk than ever
before.  A visit to Mr. Gibbs’ here will fully convince you that he has the finest herd of Jersey cows in this county.  A.
M. Hungerford, Milk Man.

100 Years Ago (1912):  Last Friday morning the word quickly passed throughout the business portion of the town
that William Meggott was dead.  A number of the public buildings of the city will serve as his monuments.  He
superintended the erection of the Grange store building, the Eager block, occupied by the Economy store, the
Eager library and drew the plans for the Catholic Church.  For the last few years, he has been proprietor of the
Commercial House where he built up a large business by his good natured and courteous treatment of all.  The
funeral was held from the home.  Besides the widow, Ella Cassody Meggott, there is left one child, little Eunice, the
mother, Mrs. Lucy Walker Meggott and sister of Janesville.  The burial was in Maple Hill cemetery.

90 Years Ago (1922):  The Masons of this city began work on their property purchased last year from the Dr. Evans
estate, for the use of a Temple for the order and its auxiliaries here.  The first work done was yesterday when a
number of members who are proficient in the use of the axe and shovels held a bee and cut down fifteen or twenty
of the large trees on the property which are in the road of the building operations which will commence shortly.  It is
the intention to tear down the entire north wing and rebuild it much larger.  The hall for lodge work, etc, will be in the
upper story of this new building, while the lower part of this building will be fitted with new ranges and dining room
furniture, everything being new and modern.  It is expected that before the building is completed that in the
neighborhood of $30,000 will be expended.

80 Years Ago (1932):  Competing with representatives from four high schools, Evelyn Lay, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. James Lay, 15 West Liberty street, won first place in extemporaneous reading at a district forensic meet held
last Thursday night in Darien.  In the oratorical contest with six schools sending representatives, Kenneth Ellis, son
of Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Ellis, 111 West Liberty street, won second place.  The title of his oration was “What is a Good
Man.”

70 Years Ago (1942):  Miss Lou Howland’s piano students will present the annual spring piano recital in the
Methodist church auditorium.  Among those who will appear on the program are:  Helen Halstead, Barbara Conroy,
Patsy Conroy, Ellen Rasmussen, Anne Guilfoyle, Anne Louise Giese, Virginia Johnson, Geraldine Nance, Robert
Kelly, Joyce Meredith, Joanne Green, Donna Green, Arlene Andrus, Gloria Nagler, Mary Alice Tullis, Anne Fellows,
Betty Giles and Lois Giles.  

60 Years Ago (1952):  Mr. and Mrs. William Dixon were honored Saturday night at a farewell party given in the VFW
club rooms by the post and the auxiliary.  Mr. Dixon left Wednesday for Tucson, Ariz., where he plans to locate.  
Mrs. Dixon and children will leave for Tucson after school closes.  Gordon Hartin has accepted the position in the
Sperry Barber shop made vacant by Mr. Dixon’s going to Arizona.

50 Years Ago (1962):  Fire of undetermined origin completely destroyed a 20 x 40 ft. old frame building on the new
high school campus formerly known as the old fairgrounds.  When Evansville was host to the Rock County fair the
building was used for a display of fine arts.  During the past several years it has been used for storage only and at
the present time the only items in the structure were a few pieces of track equipment owned by the high school and
some pheasant waterers and feeders owned by the Rock County Pheasant Association.  The Evansville fire co.
responded to the call promptly but was unable to save the building or its contents.

40 Years Ago (1972):  Final rehearsals are being held this week for the Evansville Community Theater spring place
“Me and Thee” to be presented on Saturday and Sunday nights, April 29 and 30 in the South First Street School
Auditorium.  Those in the cast are:  Mrs. Robert Wood, Mrs. Larry Olson, Mrs. Gary Hurtley, Mark Hubacher, Jeffrey
Luchsinger and Rod Davis.  Claude Willoughby is the director.  Mark Bruce is stage manager and set designer.

30 Years Ago (1982):  Monday morning, April 19, the Union Coop began work on their 1 ½ million dollar grain
elevator and corn drier just off County Trunk M south of the railroad tracks.  The cement elevator will hold
4750,000 bushels of grain.  It is designed for high speed rapid handling.  A semi can be loaded in four to six
minutes.  Dave Fellows, President of the Union Coop, turned the first shovel of earth at the ground breaking,
followed by John Morning.  Each of the directors took their turn.  

20 Years Ago (1992):  Recently Wisconsin Power and Light Foundation presented a check in the amount of $150
to Evansville to purchase trees for the city.  It was back in 1988 that former mayor Chris Eager started the
restoration program in the city, when he began his first term as mayor.  On Tuesday night, the council approved
$350 to go towards this fund.  Other donations were from the Evansville Jaycees, the Grove Society, Dr. Doug
Batty, Hagen Insurance, the Lions Club, Nelson Young Lumber, Union Bank & Trust Co., Star Printing and Magee
Construction.  

10 years ago (2002):  Evansville E.M.S. received a check in the amount of $22,000 from the Mabel Apfel estate.  
Presenting the check and carrying out Mabel’s wishes are her niece and her husband, Doris and Art Olsen,
Evansville.  Mabel Apfel was a very caring and quiet person and a life-time resident of Evansville for over 60 years.