In Review
First Week of January 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  I send you a list of some of the businessmen, from which some idea can be formed of what is going on
here:  Samuel L. Tait, Attorney, Counselor at Law, and Notary Public; B. S. Hoxie, Builder; Winston & Campbell, Proprietors of the
Spencer House; David L. Mills, Attorney at Law and Insurance Agent; Winston & Bennett, Dry Goods, Clothing, Notions,
Groceries, &c.; G. H. Palmer, Merchant Tailor; Scott & Chase, Livery and Sale Stable, Spencer House barn; Rowley & Bargewell,
Boots and Shoes, readymade and custom work; Carlton Taylor, Photographic Artists and Dealers in all kinds of frames,
engraving, albums, &c.; L. T. Pullen, General Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries and Crockeryware.  [printed in the Wisconsin State
Journal, Madison, Wisconsin, January 5, 1870.]

130 Years Ago (1880):  The annual election of officers for the Methodist Sunday School was held at their church on Sunday,
January 4th, 1880, by making choice of J. W. Osborn, Superintendent; J. E. Doolittle, Assistant Supt.; W. T. Hoxie, Secretary;
Mary Emery, Treasurer; Fred Tolles, Librarian; May Blackman, Assistant Librarian; Edgar Smith, Chorister; William Wood,
Assistant Chorister; Bell Morse, Organist; Anna Blackman, Assistant Organist;  The Secretary reported a total membership on the
roll, 226.  The total number of scholars in the infant class, under the charge of Mr. Homer Potter, 56.  There is a library of some
400 volumes, but a large portion of the books should be exchanged to render the library really serviceable to the school.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. M. D. Letter, machinist of Delavan, came in Monday night to repair the steamer [fire engine] which will
require an entire set of new flues (250) the old ones being so badly rusted and worn as to be unsafe for use.  It is a pretty severe
job and will take the whole week to do it.  In the mean time Chief Lee enjoins caution against fire and assures the people that the
hand engine is in good condition and always ready and willing to do its best.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Perhaps the greatest forward step taken by our city is the establishment of a free public library which is
now in working order in our High School building.  A subscription to the amount of fifteen hundred dollars has been raised by the
literary clubs and a few generous and public spirited citizens.  With this, books will be purchased monthly throughout the year and
the latest and best books will always be at the service of the public.  A library card costs nothing and all books are free and
everyone is equally welcome to the use of them and the reading room.  The world which now lies before us is the erection and
equipment of a modern commodious library building someplace in the center of the city.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  At the last meeting of our Factory Project club held in Fisher & Gillies office Friday evening, the report of
the investigating committee on the Crescent Casket Co., was read by Chairman T. C. Richardson, and after discussion pro and
con, action was deferred indefinitely.   The matter of a commercial or advancement association was taken up with lively interest.  It
is a well known fact that such an organization is a great help to any city and factories and business enterprise have been secured
through efforts of united forces for their cities’ advancement.  We have local enterprises that are safe investments that can be
enlarged and made to employ many people and others are knocking at our gates for admission.  

90 Years Ago (1920):   The E. J. Ballard Jewelry store, operated on Main St., by Mr. Ballard for the past 35 years, has been sold
to Myron Parks and J. S. Helgesen, both of this city and well known here as successful businessmen.  Possession was given
beginning last Monday.
.  
80 Years Ago (1930):  Evansville persons proficient in the old Dutch art of ice skating will be glad to know that the Lions club has
appropriated $50 for the building of a rink on the tennis courts at the corner of South Second and Fair streets.  The land has
been donated by A. M. Van Wormer.  The city has agreed to furnish the light and water.  The rink will be kept free from snow by
the boy scouts in order that good skating may be assured at all times.   The tract will be flooded within the next week depending
upon weather conditions.

70 Years Ago (1940):  With the completion of the new store building, a skaters’ warming room, and a shelter house for tennis
players in addition to numerous other improvements, the city’s WPA operations at Leonard and Leota parks have shown rapid
progress during the past few months.  Aiding materially the building program have been the ideal weather conditions which have
permitted outdoor work requiring moderate temperatures and the absence of snow.  The new store erected a short distance from
the old structure presents a most attractive appearance, and this building with the new shelter house completed last fall places
Evansville’s park in line with southern Wisconsin’s most modern recreational centers.  

60 Years Ago (1950):   J. Gordon Baker, president of the Baker Manufacturing Co. Evansville addressed the 1949 annual
meeting of the Econometric society, International economists’ group in New York last week.  Baker was invited to speak at the
meeting as the result of his paper on economic stabilization published in April 1948 in “Econometrics” the journal of the society.  
His interest in the problem of depressions and the business cycle was inspired by his father, the late J. S. Baker, who was also
keenly interested in economics and was instrumental in introducing the employee profit-sharing plan at the Baker plant about 50
years ago, one of the first such plans in the country.

50 Years Ago (1960):   A group of Evansville boys are putting on the first model show in this area the weekend of January 23 and
24.  About 200 model cars, planes, and boats are expected to be displayed at the show.  Driving force behind the show and the
original of the idea is John Ehle.  He is being helped in the planning by Robert Lay, Kim Gill, Joe Bradley and Kenton Bennett.  
Site of the show will probably be the Legion Hall.  The show will be under the sponsorship of The Review.  A panel of local auto
experts will be named later this week as judges.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Miss Joanne Rowald, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rowald of Route 2 Evansville received her prize of
a book entitled “Charlotte’s Web” from Mrs. Staffeld, librarian at the Eager Free public library.  Joanne was the winner of the
“Favorite Book Character” contest held in the Rock County libraries.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Fifteen acres of land, belonging to the Evansville Development Corporation was purchased on Monday,
Dec. 31, by the City of Evansville for $18,800.  The price paid for the land was the assessed valuation of the land.  Prentice
Eager is president of the EDC, Don Thompson is vice president and Richard Eager is secretary.  The board of the EDC was
reluctant to give the city an easement for a lift station and sanitary sewer line.  They preferred to sell the land to the city.  Mayor
Robert Olsen now feels there will be no problem encountered with the extension of Water Street, now that the city owns the land.

20 Years Ago (1990):  After 30 years in business, B & M Transit (Burnham & Mohr) a milk hauling firm in Evansville is quitting
operations.  B. & M. began thirty years ago in Hinkley, IL and moved to Evansville in 1961.  Craig Burnham’s father, the late Jack
Burnham, began with partner Marvin Mohr.  

10 years ago (2000):  The 15th annual Evansville Gun Show will be hosted by the Evansville Fire District on January 14, 15, and
16, 2000.  The show will be held at The Red Barn.


In Review
Second Week of January 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Married.  By Rev. H. Fowle on Tuesday, Jan. 13, at the house of Rodman Ide, in the town of Porter, Mr.
George W. Coxhead and Miss. P. A. Ide.

130 Years Ago (1880):  While chopping for Ezra Griffith in the town of Porter one day last week, Alfred Rylett, son of Mr. Thomas
Rylett , who lives about three miles northwest of town, was struck by a falling tree, the blow breaking his leg in two places.  He was
brought to town on a sled, his wounds dressed by Dr. J. M. Evans, and then taken to his father’s.  It will be some time before he
will be able to walk.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Cooksville:  Since our last writing there have been three deaths in this immediate vicinity.  Christian Inger
was buried Jan 2d at Stoughton, and leaves a wife and four young children to mourn his loss.  Mrs. Hendricks, who lived on the
McBride place and has been suffering for some time with consumption was buried at this place Jan. 3d, her husband being left
alone in his desolated home.  Mrs. Andrew Bergh was buried here Jan. 9th, and will be much missed by her husband and babies.  
She was ill only a few days.  Very many among us here have been bereaved during the last few months.  Some hereabouts claim
to have had the Russian Influenza lately, but the colds do not differ half so materially as the names of prevailing epidemics.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Evansville Fire Co. No. 1 will give an old-fashioned barbecue supper on Thursday evening Jan. 18,
1900.  Supper served from 5 to 8 in City Hall.  This will give our citizens the privilege of rallying to a good cause.  The supper will
be the best to be had.  Two roast pigs as real as life will adorn the tables at the Fireman’s supper.  A soliciting committee will
canvass the city and all are expected to donate freely.

100 Years Ago (1910):  After driving for three hours through the snow last Thursday, Rev. North succeeded in reaching the Utzig
home, in the town of Magnolia, near Cainville, where he performed the ceremony that united Miss Cora Utzig and Mr. Arthur
Gillespie, of this city, in the bonds of matrimony.  The young couple will make their home in this city where the groom is employed
in the shops.  

90 Years Ago (1920):   Chief of Police Gillman announced that the Annual Charity Ball which has not been witnessed in this city
for the past two years due to the war will again be held on February 5th.  In the past years, the Evansville Charity Ball has netted
the Relief fund of the city amounts ranging from $150 to $200.  Owing to the fact that no Charity dance has been held in two
years, the funds of the Relief committee of the city are rather badly depleted and all moneys received from the dance or other
sources will be appreciated.

80 Years Ago (1930):  After 20 years of faithful service as rural mail carrier on route 3 northeast of the city, George Magee
retired and went on the pension list Dec. 31, 1929.  Although he was eligible for retirement and pension two and one half years
ago he had his time extended two years and was later given another extension of six months.  “When I made my first trip on Jan.
16, 1910, which was by automobile, on 40 rods on my entire route of 25 miles was graveled.  Now the entire route is graveled
road with the exception of about three-fourths of a mile,” said the carrier in commenting on his route.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Effective Jan. 10, the Farmers’ and State Bank here officially became known as the Union Bank and Trust
Company.   Officers of the Union Bank and Trust Company are Leonard P. Eager, President; Dr. E. E. Denison, Vice President;
F. T. Durner, Cashier;  H. F. Brunsell and E. H. Libby constitute the board of directors.  Prior to this change in name, the bank
was known as the Farmers’ and State Bank of Evansville and was formed by the consolidation of the State Bank of Evansville and
the Farmers’ and Merchants’ Bank back in 1932.  “The change of name was decided upon in order that our bank name might be
more descriptive and more accurately indicate the increased scope of our facilities.  This is Union township.  Hence, Union Bank
and Trust Company has a definite reference to our locality and service, as well as carrying the thought that our constant
endeavor is to work in unity with the entire community for mutual progress,” Mr. Eager said.

60 Years Ago (1950):   In an impressive ceremony in the Masonic Temple here Monday night, Mrs. C. L. Conroy was installed
Eastern Star worthy matron for 1950.  Other officers are Roy Myrland, worthy patron; Mrs. Arthur Rasmussen, associate matron;
Leon Patterson, associate patron; Mrs. Charles Petersen, secretary; Mrs. Grant Howard, treasurer; Mrs. Lester Rasmussen,
conductress; Mrs. Oliver Chapin, associate conductress; Mrs. Robert Williams, chaplain; Mrs. Harold Tait, marshall.

50 Years Ago (1960):   Herbert Fursett, now 69, is retiring with a fine record of accomplishment as the only man to work
consecutively for this long period of time for the Rock County Highway Department, almost 40 years.  He has served under terms
of six superintendents, beginning with the late Chas. Moore of Evansville, April 15, 1922.  A complete change of highway
personnel has taken place during these years with the except for one other man from Beloit who has been with the department
about the same length of time.  Herb has also seen complete changes in equipment.  He says he has worked on roads in all parts
of the county.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  The Evansville Police Department has reported a total of 27 arrests made in the month of December, with
the winter weather accounting for 13 snow parking violations.  Included in the total were three arrests on disorderly conduct
charges, as well as one for prowling and one for failing to obey officers’ instructions.  Four warning citations were issued, and four
juvenile cases heard, along with 101 civil cases and complaints.  The ambulance was kept busy during the month with 16
ambulance calls answered, but the fire department was able to relax somewhat, with only one rural and one city call made during
the month.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Jeanie Olson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Olson, 319 S. Second Street had been chosen as an AFS
student for the coming year.  She will fly to New Zealand on January 18.  

20 Years Ago (1990):  Bill Meredith and his daughter, Julie, are now sharing the facility, formerly known as the Modern Barber
Shop on S. Madison Street.  The establishment is now known as Barber-Salon Meredith.  Only recently has it become possible for
Julie Meredith to go into business with her father.  Julie received her Cosmetology License from IBA Beauty College.

10 years ago (2000):  Mike Halvensleben is the new fire chief for the Evansville Community Fire District. Halvensleben was
officially appointed to the position at the January meeting of the Evansville Fire District Board.  Scott George, the former chief,
resigned from the position  after he was hired as superintendent for the Evansville Water and Light Department.  A volunteer fire
fighter with the district for the past five years, Halvensleben said he originally joined the effort as a way to get involved with the
community.  Now he will be balancing his duties as fire chief with his full-time job at the Union Cooperative Association.


I
n Review
Third Week of January 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  There seems to be considerable of a fuss over the Evansville Seminary in the State Assembly just now, if
one may judge from the number of petitions that are pouring in.  It looks like a struggle for possession of the institution between
the Methodists and the Free Will Baptists, the former having started it, but the latter sect got possession of the most of the stock
and now control it.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Theodore Robinson left Evansville Monday morning for New York, where he intends to try and win fortune
and fame as an artist.  “Ted” is an Evansville boy of whom we are all proud and having had the best of training, both in this and
the old country, we see no reason why he should not succeed.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The following are a few of the solid men of Evansville who pay a tax of over $100 each:  Harvey Prentice,
$136.42; Nelson Winston, $201.06; W. S. Smith, $102.40; A. Eager, $232.22; C. H. Wilder, $180.14; L. M. Mygatt, $105.78;
George L. Pullen, $141.28; L. T. Pullen and wife, $216.22; J. M. Evans and wife, $150.90; Byron Campbell, $142.78; P. A. Pond,
$124.02; Levi Leonard, $112.06.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  The barbecue given by Fire Co. No. 1 Thursday evening was a great success.  The two pigs weighed
seventy-five pounds each and were nicely prepared and roasted by C. & A. Story.  They were served with fine side dishes from
nearly every home in our city, the latter being donated by those who were only too glad to respond in any way to assist our
fireman.  One hundred and seventy-one tickets were sold.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  All persons are cautioned about the throwing or piling of snow on or about fire hydrants, or the piling of
snow so as to interfere with them in any way.  I trust all citizens will conform to the above request, also to report all such cases
immediately.  Ray Gillman, Fire Chief.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Last Tuesday evening, January 20, the directors of the Rock County Agricultural Association met and laid
plans for the Evansville Fair which is to be held the first week in September.  The following officers were elected to direct the
policy of the Association for the coming year:  Walter Gollmar will head the association and will have as his first assistants, Fred
Brunsell and O. C. Jones.  C. S. Ware was elected secretary of the association and Leonard Eager was named treasurer of the
association.  Zala Miller will have charge of the gates and Orville Jones of the grounds.  D. F. Finnane will serve as
superintendent of the grandstand.  Ben Green will handle the cattle; Charles Blackman, the horses; Chance Miles the sheep; and
Leo Campbell the hogs.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  Breaking the glass in the door and turning the lock from the inside, thieves gained entrance to the
Wisconsin Petroleum Company filling station, 215 East Main Street, shortly before midnight Saturday and escaped with $53.03 in
cash, two checks, and about $25 worth of automobile accessories.  The loot, according to Howard Edwards, manager, included
five sets of tire chains, two inner tubes, one tire casing, two balloon tire testers, a carton of cigarettes, and some small change
other than that taken from the cash register.  This makes the third time that the station has been entered within the past 60 days.  
The robbers, who parked their car directly in front of the station, were seen by Mike Tobin, flagman at the Northwestern railroad
crossing, who immediately summoned Officer Matt Weaver.  The latter notified police in surrounding cities to be on the lookout.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Heralded as the most extensive building project undertaken here since the erection of the grade school
building in 1921, Evansville’s new $225,000 high school building, auditorium, and kindergarten addition will be officially dedicated
at a special ceremony.  The program, and inspection tour is slated for 2 p.m. next Sunday.    

60 Years Ago (1950):   Albert S. Holmes, 27, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Holmes, Evansville, was listed by the State Department as
one of the 138 Americans under orders to get out of Communist China as quickly as transportation can be arranged.  Holmes is
records superintendent at the Shanghai legation.  He went to China in 1948 as a code clerk at Shanghai.  Following his
graduation from Evansville High School in 1940, Holmes attendant Beloit College before entering the armed forces when he
served three years doing code work in Europe.  After his discharge he returned to Beloit College from which he was graduated in
June 1948.

50 Years Ago (1960):   Evansville school building needs, and the outlook for the future of the system will be outlined to the voters
in two meetings preceding a referendum on a school bond issue to be held Feb. 9.  The meetings include a special meeting of
the school district and a discussion of the proposed plans at the PTA meeting.  The school system, with a current enrollment of
920 is expected to reach a figure of about 1,330 by the 1964-65 school year, assuming that rural districts now being served by
the Evansville High School join this system instead of some other.  Immediate needs of the school are for approximately 10
additional classrooms by next fall.

40 Years Ago (1970):  A Small Business Administration loan of $284,400 was approved today and will be used for the
construction of the Evansville Nursing Home.  The structure will be an 80-bed nursing home and will create 45 new jobs.  It will be
built by Continental Manors Inc., Sioux City Iowa.  The Evansville Betterment Corp, a group of Evansville citizens, will finance the
project donating $250,000 and a bank loan of $176,600 will provide the remainder of the $770,000 project.  Mayor Ida T. Conroy
said she hoped construction could begin almost immediately and that she was overjoyed with the news.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  A two hour meeting about a proposal for a housing development on the 5.3 acre Wyler School property
before the Evansville planning commission produced only one definite result: that more meetings will have to be held before any
such plan can comes to fruition.  About 50 people attended the meeting which was mainly held as an informational session.  Rep.
Jonathan Barry and Tom Reardon from the Wisconsin Department of Local Affairs and Development both were at the meeting to
explain exactly what tax incremental financing (TIF) is.  Roger Berg, who is proposing TIF district for the Wyler School property
along with three partners (Rollie Devlin, Marv Langeteig and Alvin Helgesen, presented to the planning commission their tentative
plans for the property.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Kim Olson, daughter of Larry and Joy Olson, Route 2, Evansville, has been awarded the Kellogg/Quest
Scholarship for the 1989-90 academic year.  Olson is a junior majoring in dairy science and agricultural journalism.  The Quest
scholarships are sponsored by the Kellogg Foundation as part of the curriculum assessment program of the college.  Leo Walsh,
dean of the UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences presented the scholarship.

10 years ago (2000):  At the Tuesday Evansville City Council meeting last week, council members voted unanimously to approve
the concept drawings for the proposed City Hall renovation.  Doug Cuthill, project architect for Foth & Van Dyke was present.  He
indicated the changes that would be made to each floor.  On the first floor, a tower would be added that would house a lobby,
elevator and elevator equipment.  According to City Administrator, Jennifer Petruzzello, about 16 to 20 feet will be added to the
north; the addition will be 29 feet deep and the elevator will be toward the back and two rest rooms will be provided on the second
floor.


In Review
Fourth Week of January 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Evansville is making it lively for the liquor sellers.  A number who have recently been convicted of dealing
have been fined and have promised to amend their ways.  It isn’t safe to deal even in brandy peaches.  Those persons who have
been troubled with aches and been cured at the Drug stores, ought to be careful or they may be called upon to witness against
our good Doctors and Deacons.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  Married:  At the residence of the bride’s father, by Rev. C. E. Goldthorp, Jan. 15, 1880, Mr. John
Robinson and Miss Mary Emery, oldest daughter of Mr. Fred Emery.  Our reporter was privileged with a look at the wedding
presents which were as follows:  1 doz. silver knives and forks, 1 ½ doz. silver teaspoons, ½ doz. Silver table spoons, silver butter
dish, silver cake basket, silver pickle dish, shell toilet set, lamp, pair vases, light stand and many other valuable and useful
articles.  The Review office enjoyed some of the wedding cake and if it is a sample of the bride’s cookery we should like to board
with you, Jack.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  Charles F. P. Pullen, who has been cashier of the Baraboo Savings Bank has received the appointment
of Postmaster of the Evansville office.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  Invitations are out for the marriage of Miss Maggie Dunphy and Mr. Martin Croak, Jan. 31.   Both parties
reside near Albany and are well known here.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  James Gillies with his team of bobs, took a merry sleigh load of members of the Cooksville Ladies’ Aid
Society to the home of Mrs. J. Porter last Wednesday afternoon where they did sewing for the hostess.  A pleasant time was
spent by all present.  The next meeting of the society will be at the home of Mrs. Wm. Porter on Wednesday, Feb. 2, to meet in
the afternoon.  Dinner will be served by the members and the day spent in sewing for the lady of the house.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The members of the newly organized Woman’s Missionary Society of the Congregational Church are
arranging for their second open meeting which is to occur the evening of Thursday, February 5th.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  Charles S. Seversen, local golf pro, has leased the hall above the Baker-Smith Hardware where he will
give golf instructions during the remaining winter months.  Mr. Seversen has served as professional here for the past two years
and holds the course record in Evansville with a 70 and in Mt. Horeb with a 73.  The golf equipment in the hall will be available to
the public at all times, with the exception of Monday, Wednesday, and Friday nights and Sunday afternoons when the instructions
will be given.  The rental charge for the equipment will be 25 cents per day.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Harold Zwickey, Walker street, sustained a severe cut through the lower lip and broken tips from his upper
teeth here Friday morning when a crank rod flew up and struck him in the face.  He was attempting to bend the crank rod with an
axe to fit his car when the accident occurred.  First aid was administered by a local physician.

60 Years Ago (1950):   Myron Beyer, local policeman, who was on duty during Monday night fell on the ice on East Main Street at
2 a.m.  Tuesday and fractured his leg just above the knee.  He was checking Main Street doors when the accident happened.  
After he “tried” the Chevrolet garage door he turned to go into the street when he fell.  He had difficulty in reaching his home on
Montgomery Court being obliged to crawl the distance which took him about an hour.  Unfortunately there was no one on the
street to give him assistance.  He was taken to Madison General Hospital for treatment.  

50 Years Ago (1960):   Postmaster R. J. Antes announces that the long-awaited opening of  Evansville’s new Post Office will take
place Monday, February 1.  An official notice from the postal department directs that the old quarters be vacated Sunday Jan.
31.  Edwin Nelson, contractor and owner, is to be congratulated on his fine structure.  New equipment has been installed and
most everything is ready for occupancy.  It will take a little time for the employees to acquaint themselves with all the new
furnishings after using antiquated equipment for the past ten decades.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fisk and daughter, Beth, have moved to Evansville and are residing on Lincoln St.
where they have purchased a home.  They are former Brooklyn residents

30 Years Ago (1980):  The new manager of the Evansville Bowl, Gregg Landreman and Sue Clark, have brought new life to the
area’s only bowling alley.  Gregg and Sue took over the lanes after Gregg’s father, Norbert Landreman bought the business from
Uva Zweifel four weeks ago.  Mrs. Zweifel ran the establishment as Zweifel’s Lanes for about 20 years with her late husband
Cloyence Zweifel.  Mrs. Zweifel is now retired, but still lives in town.

20 Years Ago (1990):  The Lecy-Luebke family has moved from Raymond Rd. in Madison to their new home in Evansville on Rte.
2.  Vicky Lecy-Luebke is on the faculty in the Evansville School District.  

10 years ago (2000):  A high school fire, which started in the atrium of the Ag Education rooms, destroyed the Ag facility and
spread to nearby engineering drafting rooms.  The Ag room wound up as almost a total disaster area and the engineering room
suffered mainly ceiling damage.  Otherwise, the cleanup involved smoke damage and deodorizing the school generally.  The
Thursday evening conflagration forced cancellation of both the Varsity and JV Brodhead-Evansville basketball games.  The gym
had to be evacuated during the early JV game.  Only 15 minutes into the JV game the fire alarm sounded.  Thanks to the
combined efforts of the school staff and police department everyone was evacuated safely so as to allow the Evansville Fire
Department to secure the affected area.


In Review
First Week of February 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  If our friend who feels so much aggrieved at the conduct of one of our lady teachers, will practice what he
preaches to her, and economize his breath, he may be able to apply it to a better purpose.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  George F. Wolff and George E. Cramer:  Here we are, Wolff & Cramer, practical painters, sign writers,
grainers and fresco artists.  Do their work with the brush and camels hair pencil, not with their mouths; carriages, wagons, etc.,
painted as they should be.  They do not work for fun, but as cheap as good work can be done.  Try them, over Baker’s
Blacksmith Shop, Evansville, Wisconsin.  George E. Cramer is prepared to give private lessons in penmanship.  He uses the
popular system which is not the old Spencerian, either in principles or movement.  If you desire lessons, leave your orders at the
Post Office and he will call on you.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  Winship and Smith were busy the forepart of the week cutting and hauling ice, first putting 300 tons into
Mr. Pratt’s fruit house and then 160 tons in the Ellis’ buttery.  There was a good deal of activity on the pond last Thursday.  Eight
teams hauling, and some seven or eight men were marking off new fields, others cutting up long strips into convenient blocks for
hauling and others with long pikes were pushing the ice to the loading chute and up the incline into the wagons.  The ice is about
one foot thick and most of it is passably good.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  The Free Library spirit is sweeping over our land.  Carnegie is donating thousands of dollars; the Iowa
legislature is creating a state library commission; and Evansville is expending a $1,500 subscription and at the same time raising
more funds.  Three of her eminent sons, Prof. Charles R. Van Hise, Hon. Robert M. La Follette, and Hon. W. Burr Jones have
consented to give a course of lectures donating the total proceeds to the library.  Prof. Charles Van Hise is a geologist of national
reputation.  Do not fail to hear his illustrated lecture on “the Changing Land.”  Magee’s Opera House, Saturday, Feb. 13.  
Admission 25 cents.  Proceeds for Free Library.  If Profs. Van Hise, Jones and La Follette pay their own expenses to aid our
library movement, are we not under obligations to give each one a large audience?

100 Years Ago (1910):  John Sperry has purchased part of the B. W. Hubbard farm, and Lloyd Hubbard and wife will occupy the
same after the first of March.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Clyde Heffel has purchased the Harry Pease farm on the northeast side of town.

80 Years Ago (1930):  A deal was closed this week whereby Miss Theresa Erickson purchased the Magee Beauty shop, 7 ½ East
Main Street from Mrs. Charlotte Magee who recently purchased the Marinello shop from Mrs. Charles Heil in Monroe.  Miss
Erickson, who has been employed as operator in the local shop for the past year, takes possession this week.  The Magee
Beauty Shop was damaged to the extent of about $300 at 6:30 p.m. Sunday when a kerosene heater exploded and started a
blaze.  Had it not been for the prompt response of the city fire department and the efficiency of the local firemen it is believed that
the flames would have swept through the entire Economy block.  Following the explosion, the flames spread like a flash to the
rafters and floor below having done considerable damage by the time the fire trucks arrived.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Located three miles northwest of Evansville is the 218-acre farm of Peter Templeton who was honored at
the University of Wisconsin Monday night for his outstanding agricultural accomplishments.  Templeton, prominent Evansville
farmer and horse breeder was among three rural women and two farm leaders honored Monday night during the Farm and Home
Week program at the University of Wisconsin.  Templeton received the award from Dean Chris L. Christensen, head of the
College of Agriculture: “Because of his breadth of vision, his careful judgment in farm management, his skill in livestock breeding,
and his unswerving devotion to right principles.”

60 Years Ago (1950):   John I. Scott, former editor of the Evansville Review, died at 12:40 a.m. today in Mercy Hospital in
Janesville, following a long illness.  Mr. Scott was born in the city of St. Louis, March 21, 1863.  On November 13, 1888, he was
united in marriage to Miss Lena Farwell of Osborne, Kansas.  Mr. Scott came to Wisconsin in 1913, and was editor of the Athens,
Wisconsin Record for several years, coming to Evansville in 1917 to accept the editorship of the Evansville Review, which he
conducted for 12 years and was associated with the editorial staff until the time of his death.  Mr. and Mrs. Scott have served as
custodians of Leota Park for the past 15 years.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Only a handful of interested voters attended the special school district meeting Monday night.  The group
passed, unanimously a resolution to designate the fairgrounds as the site for Evansville’s needed new school, and discussed the
proposed building and building costs for about an hour.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Featured at the regular Eastern Star Meeting in the Masonic Temple will be the celebration of the chapter’
s 78th birthday.  Among the older organizations in the city, the chapter received its charter here in February 1892 and was the
29th chapter organized in the state.  There were 33 charter members, all of whom are deceased.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Vaughn Lewis of 354 N. Madison Street, agreed to be a write-in candidate in the April election for the two-
year term for third ward alderman to replace Robert O. Brunsell.  No candidate had filed for the post by the Jan. 2 deadline to be
on the April ballot.  Lewis 66, was employed at GMAD in Janesville for 36 ½ years.  He and his wife, Alberta, who is receptionist
for the Janesville Gazette, have a married son, Gary Lewis.  

20 Years Ago (1990): A vicious snow storm, raging up from the southwest on Thursday of last week, dropped some six to eight
inches of snow on the Evansville area.  Strong winds along with the snow wreaked havoc with the roads, with drifting making some
roads impassable.  Evansville schools were open in the morning, but at 11:30 were declared closed due to the weather
conditions.  However when Ringhand Bus owners attempted to take the children home in the country, they found they could not
get through and thus brought the children back to the schools.  During the afternoon some of the children went home with friends
in the city and awaited a pickup from parents.  The storm eventually died down in mid afternoon and efforts were made to make
the roads passable so that parents could pick up their children.   

10 years ago (2000): Dr. Gary Albrecht, Evansville’s Superintendent of Schools, made a recommendation to the School board,
that a pre-referendum agreement be made with Bray and Associates Architectural firm at Monday night’s special school board
meeting.  Five of the six school board members agreed that Bray and Associates would give the best value.    


In Review
Second Week of February 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  A couple of wild cats were shot within a few miles of this village, Wednesday last.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  There will be a St. Valentine’s Masquerade Ball at Grange Hall, on Friday evening, Feb. 13th.  Music:  
Prof. J. M. Smith’s famous Quadrille Band of Janesville.  Supper at the Central House, 75 cents per couple.  Room Directors:  C.
A. Hollister, Elmer Bullard, Spencer Ide, and M. Broderick.  A grand time is expected.  C. A. Hollister will furnish masks for all who
leave orders at his store.  Masks will be removed promptly at 12 o’clock.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The farmers met again Saturday afternoon, heard reports of canvassers, talked up the matter of cheese
and butter making, and adjourned to Monday afternoon to prepare articles of incorporation.  The following were appointed
committee on charter:  Add. Patterson, Jas. Montgomery, Martin Dixon, John Tullar, W. H. H. Johnson.

110 Years Ago (1900): Upon last Saturday night the Baker Manufacturing Company called its employees together at five o’clock
and for the second time in its history distributed a certain percent of the next profits of the year to each employee.  Last year
aside from his weekly wages each employee received 10 percent of his year’s earnings and the highest amount paid to any one
man was eighty dollars.  This year each employee was given aside from his wages 60 percent of his year’s earnings, the high
amount paid to any one man was $498.45 while the average paid was $245.79.

100 Years Ago (1910):  C. J. Pearsall, son Clifford and Ace and Roy Fellows went to Chicago this morning to attend the
automobile show.  They were joined at Beloit by Robert Pearsall.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The World Wide Guild of the Baptist Church met Monday evening at the home of Mrs. H. O. Meyers.  
Twenty-three were present.  Mrs. J. W. Ballard read us some letters from our missionary, Mrs. Eileen Beath from China, about the
country and their work in the Mission School.


80 Years Ago (1930):  Ben Doty, Beloit steeplejack, is at work here this week repairing the 75 foot stack at the city public schools,
the 100 foot stack at the power house, and the 125 foot stack at the plant of the Baker Manufacturing company.  He has been
pointing up the stacks and placing steel bands around the top.

70 Years Ago (1940):   A check for $12 to aid the hundreds of thousands of Finnish women and children and sick and aged
civilians who have been driven from their homes in the devastated war area of Europe went forward from Evansville this morning
to Ex-Governor Walter J. Kohler, who is serving as state chairman of the national campaign.  Public-spirited Evansville citizens
contributing to the city’s Finnish relief fund were Warren Rodd $5, B. F. Mapes $1, H. A. Knapp $1, Mrs. Stella Chase $2, Miss
Ruth Chase $1, and the Rev. T. C. Nagler $2.

60 Years Ago (1950):   Mrs. Orlin Holm general PTA program chairman has the following to say about the next PTA meeting.  The
group will present a variety show in the school auditorium at 8 p.m. next Thursday, February 16.  The Variety show includes the
talents of local people.  Some of the features are square dancing, readings, skits, and a one-act comedy.  John Kennedy is
master of ceremonies; Mrs. Clyde Fisher, program chairman and Miss Gladys Peterson, ticket sales chairman.   

50 Years Ago (1960):  About 85 people, mostly members of the Evansville, Brooklyn, and Footville Fire Departments were
entertained by union Mutual Insurance Company here Monday night.  Ray Ryan and Charles Maas, of Union Mutual, praised the
firemen for the work they were doing, and both expressed their company’s desire to cooperate in cutting fire losses.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  The State of Wisconsin has installed a breathalyzer in City Hall.  Three Evansville patrolmen have returned
from a school in Janesville where they qualified to operate the device, which tests alcoholic content of the breath.  Patrolmen who
will operate the machine are Robert Hallmark, Charles Babler and Robert Albright.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Harlan Steindl has announced that he will be a third-ward write-in candidate for alderman for the April
election.  Steindl states that many residents have urged him to run.  He was formerly a city councilman, having served the city for
4 ½ years.  He will oppose Vaughn Lewis, who announced recently he was a write-in candidate also.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Blair Thomas Wheeler received the Eagle Scout Award, the highest award in Scouting, on Sunday,
December 3, 1989 in a Court of Awards Ceremony at the Congregational United Church of Christ in Evansville.  He is the son of
Burt and Donna Wheeler.  Blair is a member of Troup 514 which is sponsored by the Evansville Lions Club.  Jay Gitchel
presented the award.  Scoutmaster Rod Courtier and members of the Troop 514 participated in the ceremony.  Blair’s Eagle
Project consisted of planning, organizing, and overseeing the completion of cleaning and painting the fire hydrants in Evansville.  

10 years ago (2000):    At Monday night’s school board meeting, Dr. Gary Albrecht, District Administrator, presented a time line
for the 2000 school building referendum.  With a tentative Tuesday, May 23rd referendum date, the time line provides for a
continuation of the meetings aimed at selecting the best referendum building plan.  A Master Plan Design Committee is being
formed to provide a mechanism for school personnel and community members to meet and work cooperatively with the architect
and the school administration to develop and validate a long-range curriculum and facilities plan for approval by the School
Board.  


In Review
Third Week of February 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The members of the spirited Lyceum have had their pictures taken in their sleighs in bannered
procession, in front of their hall on Madison Street.  After the operation was successfully performed, they started for a sleigh ride.  
[Note:  the Lyceum used the old 2-room frame school house that stood on the grounds of today’s City Hall.  The building was also
the Village of Evansville and Town of Union meeting hall.]

130 Years Ago (1880):  Married at the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Chapin, on the 5th inst. By Rev. E. Robinson, Eugene
L. Bullard and Celia A. Chapin, both of Union.  Nice sample of wedding cake sent to the Review office.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  The mill property at Cooksville was sold at auction on Wednesday.  Mr. Lloyd of Janesville being the
purchaser.  $500 was the price paid.

110 Years Ago (1900): Mr. Edward Ford, a prosperous farmer in the town of Porter, delivered 12 loads of ’99 tobacco at Ollie
Colony’s warehouse in this city, last Monday and received for it the handsome sum of $1,600.

100 Years Ago (1910):  The old Spanish letter swindle is still being worked, it seems.  A citizen of Evansville recently received one
of these letters containing the same old story.  The writer pretending to be a banker imprisoned in Madrid and offering $160,000
in return for aid in recovering his property of $480,000 which he has in America, also that of his “darling daughter.”  The scheme
this time did not work, however, as Evansville businessmen are too wise to get “stung” by such a swindle.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Evansville Players were forced to postpone their production of  “Why Smith Left Home” indefinitely,
due to the illness at the last moment of Mrs. Fred Brunsell, who was cast for the part of the leading lady.  To say that Evansville
theater goers were disappointed is not being able to see the Evansville Players in their latest farce comedy is putting it mildly.  
Tickets may be redeemed at the Pioneer Drug Store.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Don Bestor, former Evansville resident and nationally known orchestra leader, was on the air at 11 p.m.
Thursday from station KDKA, Pittsburgh, and was heard by many local radio fans.  Mr. Bestor is a son of Mrs. C. E. Bestor, 114
South Third Street, and a brother of Miss Helen Bestor of the same address.   Mr. Bestor and his orchestra were among the first
prize winners in a popularity contest for artists and announcers of KDKA.  He entertained the other winners last Thursday night at
the William Penn Hotel where his orchestra has been playing since last May.

70 Years Ago (1940):  The Union Cooperative Association, which operates gasoline and oil stations in Brooklyn and Evansville
did an annual gross business of $94,888 last year, an increase of 27 percent over 1938.  The financial report at the co-op’s
annual meeting was presented by Carl Spersrud, co-operative manager. The meeting was attended by more than 300 members.  
Spersrud said the association’s annual business has risen from a total of $21,144 in 1935.  The co-op did not open its Brooklyn
station until November 1939.  

60 Years Ago (1950):   Features of the PTA Founders’ Day Variety Show include barbershop harmony by the K. P. quartet and
the Village Limits, a reading by Mrs. Charles Shelby; tap dancing and choral work by members of the Leota School; music by the
Floyd Krause family; accordion music by Cathrine Franklin; and songs by six-year-old Sharon Krause, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Orrie Krause, accompanied on the accordions by Janice Abey and Doris Gransee.  The money earned will be used locally for
donations and scholarships.

50 Years Ago (1960):   One senior at Evansville High School has been named a finalist in the 1959-60 competition of the National
Merit Scholarship Corporation program and has been awarded a Certificate of Merit, according to Principal J. C. McKenna.  Sheila
W. Sorkin has received the certificate which attests to her high academic promise.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Five candidates filed papers for the three school board vacancies:  Dr. Henry Youngman, Erwin Zweifel,
Kenneth Rabideau, David Fellows and Robert C. Kelley.  Kelley and Fellows filed for re-election.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Aaron Hedgecock and Harold Hartwich, Evansville High School students have drawn murals before and
Pam Wilson, second ward councilwoman and teacher in the high school, suggested they do one for the council room at the city
hall.  They have studied photographs of Evansville structures as well as those which have been demolished.  They are drawing
sketches for the city hall mural, which has been approved by the City Council.

20 Years Ago (1990):  UW-Whitewater has released the names of some 1,735 undergraduate students who were named to the
honor roll for academic achievements for the fall semesters of the 1989-90 school year.  Among those named were the following
from this area:  Jan E. Bue, Jennifer Dunphy, Susan Shotliff, Jon D. Sieg, Kim M. Spanton, Rebecca L. Sterk, Jon K. Waller and
Russell C. Youngman of Evansville.   

10 years ago (2000):   Brenda Berg announced that seven J. C. McKenna Middle School 8th grade chorus members were picked
to participate in the American Choral Director’s Association 2000 convention in Madison on March 1-3.  They were chosen from
almost 500 students throughout the six-state region.  The students selected are Brookes Baumberger, Andy Magee, Brittany
Emrick, Britta Hegge, Erin Ellison, Elena Lahti, and Saroi Faulkner.  Each of the singers submitted an audition tape consisting of a
folk song and one verse of America, both songs acappella.   

In Review
Fourth Week of February 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Great interest is manifested in the meetings now in progress in the M. E. Church.  At the present time
about 47 have professed conversion.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Theodore Robinson writes to his parents that he enjoys better health in New York, where he now is, than
he did here.  Sea breezes agree with him.

120 Years Ago (1890):  At a meeting of the Trotting Park Association in the Central House Saturday Night, Mr. McEwen made a
proposition to the Association that he would properly fence his track, put up a shingled roof stand and a number of box stalls and
put his track in first rate shape for $400.  The proposition was accepted.  France Boyce, of Brooklyn, being present was called
upon to state some of the conditions of the association joining the Trotter’s Circuit which included an area of six towns, which
would give Evansville two trots from noted horses, during the season.  Newton Kendall, C. E. Lee and Henry Campbell were
appointed a committee to investigate matters of a charter.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  Misses Maggie Gillies and Edna Biglow left Tuesday morning for New Orleans to attend the Mardi Gras.  
They will be gone about three weeks and will visit several points of interest in the sunny south.

100 Years Ago (1910):  With this week’s issue the Review sends forth to its subscribers all over the country the 1910 illustrated
Industrial Prospectus of this city.  The work has a double duty to perform and is also of dual origin.  The Review would point out
that this sixteen-page Prospectus was printed in the office of the Review.  The new Commercial Club of Evansville has officially
recognized the work.  Practically every business institution and individual merchant and professional man in the city of Evansville
took space in the edition and made it possible to publish.  The Commercial Club has undertaken to send out the prospectus to
the investors of the country.  He will surely be stirred by the “Trumpet Call” of this model municipality.  [The Prospectus is online in
the Evansville Digitization Project http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/WI.IllustratedPro1910  and in bound copy at the Eager
Free Public Library.]

90 Years Ago (1920):   Mrs. Mary Ellen Courtier, aged 83 died Tuesday afternoon after an illness of two months.  She leaves
three sons, Burr, L. B., and Clyde, also several grandchildren.  Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, at the Clyde
Courtier home, Rev. A. W. Stevens of the Baptist Church conducted the services.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Charles Maloy, 213 West Liberty Street, has gone into partnership with Frank Brigham in the livestock
business here.  Mr. Brigham was formerly with Luchsinger and Stevens.  Fred Luchsinger has gone into partnership with Rodd
and Miles in the livestock business here, according to an announcement made this week by Fred Rodd.  The firm has chosen
Footville as a new shipping point and will ship from there on Thursday of every week.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Peter A. Finstad, 35, former high school coach and night police officer and southern Wisconsin’s most
outstanding baseball enthusiast, died Friday in the Wisconsin General Hospital, Madison, following a lingering illness of several
months from Hodgkin’s disease.  Funeral services were held here Sunday in the new high school auditorium which was filled to
capacity.  Mr. Finstad was married to Miss Leone Lemke, Aug. 29, 1930.  He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Norma and
Carol; his father Nels Finstad, Mason; two sisters, Mrs. Allen Nelson, Mason, and Miss Marie Sandstrom, Washington D. C.; and
three brothers, Helmer Finstad, Washburn; Oscar Finstad, Mason and Frank Finstad, Ashland.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Following the storm of last week Monday, the city snow plow and workers were out early opening up the
streets in the city.  The following figures and statistics show the amount of work that was accomplished in a short time.  Four men
with two trucks and tractors and loaders worked 27 hours at a cost of $3.95 per hour with a total of $106.65.  The cost of the gas
and oil was $30.  There were 270 loads of snow hauled off the streets, a total of 1,620 cubic yards.  The work was done on Main
Street from First to Union, on Madison Street, from Church to Mill, one-half block on Maple Avenue and on Railroad Streets.   

50 Years Ago (1960):   Another school district joined the Evansville district this week, when District No. 1, Cainville, in Center
township, came into the local district by action of the township boards and Evansville Council.  The Cainville school has about two
dozen pupils and the district has an equalized valuation of $589,100.  The Drew district, which attached to the local district earlier,
had about 20 children at that time and an equalized valuation of $448,800.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  The local basketball team got a rousing welcome back into Evansville last Friday night as word of their
winning the Central Title spread.  They were escorted into town by the police car and the fire engines as well as tooted in by all
the spectators cars which followed.  Evansville ended with a 16-2 overall record.  Their final league play standing was 9-1.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  A priority list of proposed cuts compiled by the budget review committee and presented to the school
board last week Thursday night, drew considerable discussion at a special meeting of the school board Tuesday night.  The
majority of the complaints voiced by some of the more than 80 persons in attendance centered around proposed athletic cuts,
including two the board chose to add, dropping a wrestling and a basketball coach.   The cuts included dropping golf, cross
country, girls and boys tennis, middle school cheerleading, an assistant athletic director, assistant track coach, two football
coaches, the intramural program and weight lifting, but adding 7th and 8th grade wrestling.

20 Years Ago (1990): Juna Nimz, representing the Generic Band, was crowned Snowball Queen last Saturday night at the annual
event held at the Red Barn in Evansville.  The dance is sponsored by the EMT’s and proceeds go towards the purchase of new
equipment for use by residents.  Some 350 were in attendance and it was one of the bigger crowds they have seen.

10 years ago (2000):  Evansville’s McDonalds/Amoco Grand Opening will be held Thursday, Feb. 24 thru Sunday, Feb. 27.   

In Review
First Week of March 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  There are fourteen clergymen in Evansville to minister to our spiritual wants.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  The Evansville Mercantile Association held their annual meeting.  The new officers elected are George F.
Spencer, President; T. C. Richardson, Treasurer; E. J. Doolittle, Secretary.  Their sales the past year reached $64,000.  The
business is being run very acceptably by the stockholders. [Note:  the Evansville Mercantile Association was also known  as the
Grange Store.]

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mrs. M. V. Pratt went to Chicago last week to witness the graduation of Miss Nellie Hartley, from the
woman’s hospital, corner of Rhoda Avenue and 32d Street.   Miss Hartley has been in that institution some year and a half, and
has made herself proficient as a hospital nurse, and she now goes out with a diploma that entitles her to many privileges in the
line of duty and choice of profession as a nurse for the sick.  Some think it a strange choice for an amiable young lady like Miss
Hartley to have but such is her delight, and she puts forth every energy to excel in her profession.  Her many friends at home wish
her the success her arduous labors entitles her to acquire.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  Thursday evening March 1, Miss Zoe Rogers and Mr. Curtis Pierce, both of this vicinity.  The
couple took their departure on the night train for their new home in Wessington, S. D.

100 Years Ago (1910):  The Commercial Club of Evansville will hold a banquet at the Central Hotel, Tuesday evening, March 15,
1910.  The following toasts will be responded to:  How to Make Evansville Grow; the Booster and the Kicker; City Government by
Commission; Sewage and the Spring Election; The Present High Cost of Living and Its Results.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Charles Winkleman has moved into the George Bahr place which he recently purchased.  Mr. Bahr has
moved onto a farm.  F. Seeman has moved to a farm in East Center.   Lyle Wells is moving to Evansville.  Mr. Beckwith is moving
into Fenner Beal’s house here.  Albert Bratzke has moved to his new home purchased from Mike Mulcahy. [Cainville Center,
Magnolia Township news.]

80 Years Ago (1930):  Melvin Ingraham, 83, one of the five surviving members of the local post of the G. A. R. attended the
University of Wisconsin when it boasted of only 600 students.  “I entered the school with Burr Jones shortly after the close of the
Civil War and like many of the other students worked for my board, room, and tuition clearing the campus which was then a forest
grown up with underbrush,” explained the veteran in commenting on his education.  “At that time the school had three buildings,
two dormitories, one for girls and one for boys, and a chapel which was heated by wood burning stoves.  The faculty was
comprised of not more than three teachers at the most,” he said.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Little Philip Erpenbach, five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Erpenbach, played the role of a hero and
save his two sisters, Donna Jean, 7, and Barbara, 15 months, from being burned to death when fire broke out in their residence
at 239 West Liberty Street, and badly damaged the roof, attic, and second floor of the home.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Following the business session and obligation ceremony of the Eastern Star Monday night, the triple trio of
the high school sang three numbers under the direction of E. M. Cannelin.  The trio comprised of Georgia Hensel, Carol Hazlett,
Faye Wolff, Diane Cromhecke, Joan Moldenhauer, Shirley Wolff, Patricia Gibbs, Theresa Gibbs and June Heffel.  Barbara Conroy
is the accompanist.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Mr. and Mrs. Fenner Beal will observe their 50th wedding anniversary Sunday, March 6, with an open
house at their farm home on Route 2, Evansville.  Mr. Beal and the former Grace Clark were married Mar. 3, 1910, in a double
wedding ceremony with George Brigham and the former Emma Levzow.  They have one son, Clark and two grandchildren.  Mr.
Beal was employed for many years as a shovel operator with the Rock County Sugar Company and the Drew-Garry Construction
Company.

40 Years Ago (1970):  A most interesting and informative panel discussion will take place tonight, Thursday, at the auditorium of
the First Street School.  Purpose of the discussion is to explain about the proposed Evansville Nursing Home to all interested area
residents.  Dr. Robert Heimerl is serving as chairman of the event and will moderate the Question and Answer period.  An 80 bed
nursing home will be built on the corner of Fifth St. and Garfield Ave. for residential and convalescent care.  The total cost of the
nursing home will be $711,000.

30 Years Ago (1980):  After one year with the Evansville Police force, officer Clint Flood has joined the Rock County Sheriff’s
Department.  He is one of eight hired by the County Sheriff’s Dept. and has moved to Janesville.  Prior to coming to Evansville, he
was on the police force in Milwaukee and before that he was in Janesville.

20 Years Ago (1990):  “Player of the Year” is the new honor conferred upon Tim Trow, by a vote of the conference coaches of
the Rock Valley Conference.  Trow, 6’ 3”, 180 lb, senior, has broken four records and tied two.   Trow led the conference in
scoring.  The four records that Trow surpassed are:  Dave Baumgarten’s Single Season Scoring Record, set in 1968 of 518
points.  Trow had 550.  The Single Season Assist Record of Steve Parish of 132, set in 1976 now goes to Trow with 143.  Trow
also broke Scott McElroy’s Free Throw Record, for the most free throws made in a season set in 1983, of 105, now Trow has 167
free throws.  The fourth record to fall was that of Charlie Allen’s 1974 record of 49 blocked shots.  Tim Trow has 77 for his career.

10 years ago (2000):  Ronald Wilbur, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Wilbur, Evansville, graduated Cum Laude from UW-Stout, with a
Bachelor’s degree in Graphic Communications Management.


In Review
Second Week of March  1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):   The public schools closed Friday with review and exhibition in a highly creditable manner.  We believe a
very general satisfaction has been given by all the teachers.

130 Years Ago (1880):  We understand that sixty-five converts have joined the M. E. Church since the commencement of the
revival meetings.  Quite a number have joined the other churches, but we have been unable to learn how many.  Such an
awakening has never been experienced in Evansville.  May the good work go on “till all shall know the Lord, whom to know aright
is life eternal.” The meetings are still continued at the M. E. Church and there appears to be no abatement in the enthusiasm.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Wilder has been making some pretty heavy lumber sales the past week.  Sold to John Needham, of
Magnolia, lumber for tobacco shed; E. S. Hoague, of Porter for the same, and several barn orders.  His sales within the last two
weeks have amounted to $2,000.  
110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  At the home of the bride’s parents, March 7, at high noon by Rev. Mr. Miner, Miss Jennie Adee
and Mr. Seth L. Crall both of the town of Center.  The bride’s home was six miles east of this city where the wedding occurred and
fifty-five persons sat down to the sumptuous dinner.  The young couple were handsomely remembered by their friends with many
beautiful and well selected presents.  Mr. and Mrs. Crall will make their home on the farms of Mr. Eli Crall in the town of Center.  
Their many friends will wish them a long, happy and prosperous life.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  The meeting to consider the canning factory project, at the city hall, Saturday, was well attended and the
sentiment seemed strong in favor of a factory here.  Mr. Adams of Sycamore, Ill. was present and gave an interesting talk on the
subject.  A committee has been appointed by the Commercial Club who will have charge of the matter and will bring it to a
successful issue if possible.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Mrs. Frederika L. Apfel was born in Mackleburger, Sparine, Germany in the year 1838.  She came to
America in 1857, was married in Milwaukee in the year 1860 to Henry Apfel and came to Center, Rock County, in the same year
and resided there until the year 1899, when they moved to this city.  The same year the husband passed to the world beyond.  
Ten children were born to them, seven boys and three girls of which all survive her.  Lew and Albert of this city, Mrs. Rosa Miller
of Marshall, Minn., Will of Beloit, John of Neilsville, George of Dell, Mrs. Lucy Kuelz, of Fellows, Charles of Cameron, Mrs. Charles
Miller of Larifore, North Dakota and Henry of Janesville.  There are 33 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Vic Wall, local entertainer and drummer, will broadcast from Station WIBA, Madison tonight.  Vic will sing
and play his own accompaniment on the guitar.  He is representing the Brooklyn post in a program sponsored by the Dane
County American Legion posts.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Fifty-eight purebred and registered Percheron and Belgian horses were auctioned off in the fourth annual
state sale conducted by the Wisconsin Horse Breeders’ Assn. in the University of Wisconsin stock pavilion.  They were the choice
stock of the year, association officials declared.  Peter Templeton, Evansville, Association President, and Fred Caygill, Linden,
were elected to fill two director vacancies in the group’s annual meeting.

60 Years Ago (1950):  The Moore rural grade school should be closed, the Moore and Gardner school districts consolidated and
the Gardner re-opened for use of the combined districts was the recommendation made by the Rock County education committee
at a meeting.  The committee met jointly with the town board of Magnolia and the school boards of Moore and Gardner schools.  
The Moore school which is located four miles southwest of Evansville has been in constant use since it was erected 99 years ago,
Miss Mary Frances, New York state, was its first teacher.

50 Years Ago (1960):   Frank W. West, 85, died early Wednesday morning at his home on E. Main St. after a long illness.  He was
born May 15, 1874, in Ohio, the son of Henry and Mary Okey West.  He married Blanche Barnard Nov. 4, 1901, in Chicago.  He
was engaged in the wholesale tobacco business here for many years.  He has been an Evansville resident for more than 63
years.  Surviving are his wife and sister-in-law.  Mrs. Bertha Lees, Evansville, a brother, Robert C. West of San Diego, Calif.; and
several nieces and nephews.  Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Allen Funeral Home following cremation.  
Interment will be in Maple Hill Cemetery

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mayor Ida T. Conroy and John Wyse president of the Evansville Betterment Corp., and Dr. Samuel S.
Sorkin, president of the Continental Manor of Evansville were at last Thursday night’s panel discussion on the proposed nursing
home for Evansville.  A local drive for bond sales to be completed by April 1, is now underway.  Construction cannot begin until
the sale of $250,000 in debenture bonds is completed.  Anyone wishing information may contact these people.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Members of the Jaycees and several others interested in Lake Leota were on hand Sunday to cut holes
through the ice on Lake Leota.  The purpose was to update their information on water depth and amount of soft silt.  They cut 35
to 40 holes in a grid pattern of 200 feet apart.  Those who helped were Dan Hazlett, Phil Golz, Norman Thompson, Jaycee
members were Phil Kress, Greg Whitmore, Mike Loftus, Bob Dammen, Ron Maxwell, Ron Bennett and Kendall Schneider.  Bob
Brunsell and Roy Sarow supplied the workers with refreshments.  

20 Years Ago (1990): The Rock Valley Conference has selected players to be named to the All Conference Basketball Team for
1989-90.  In Boys Basketball from Evansville, Tim Trow, senior, has been named to the First Team, and was chosen Player of the
Year.  Matt Kraus and Sid Bagley have been given honorable mention.  In Girls Basketball, senior Jenny Grovesteen has been
named to the Second Team and Sandy Larson and Shannon Maves have been given honorable mention.

10 years ago (2000):    The Evansville High School Forensics Team, 23 members strong, traveled to Big Foot Union High School
on February 28, to challenge seven other schools for the Conference Forensics Championship.  Evansville won the competition
for the 5th consecutive years, a record.  The team will be attending the State Forensics finals in April.  Carl Bennett is the team’s
coach.  Participants are Heidi Martin, Jeri Schnabel, Joe Syverson, Carrie Schmidt, Amber VanGalder, Adam Erdmann, Amy
Hauri, Cody Marenes, Lana Albright, Becky Doverspike, Emily Saul, Jamie Jakes, Joanna Forde, Ben Herman, B. J. Warren, Max
Percy, Justin Tilley, Shad Wanless, Elizabeth Dietzman, Lexi Herman, Serena Johnson, Becca Tracey, and Tabatha Wethel.  


In Review
Third Week of March 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The alarm of fire at the Seminary Thursday night, was occasioned by the breaking of a lamp on the stage
during the rehearsal.  No essential damage was done however, but somebody was awfully “skeered.”

130 Years Ago (1880):  The Evansville Mutuals have reorganized for 1880 and are ready to play any club in the state, on
condition.  The following are the players:  Cal Broughton, catcher; Bayard Andrews, pitcher; with Morehouse, Owen, F.
Broughton, on bases and Hunt in the field.  John Silverthorn and A. Broughton extras.  Invitations are open to all clubs in the
state.  Matt Broderick, Manager.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The meeting Friday night called for the purpose of considering the matter of building a public hall for
public purposes, received a pretty good attendance.  C. E. Lee was made chairman and W. R. Phillips was chosen secretary.  
After a good deal of desultory talk of building a hall, its use and purposes, a resolution was adopted requiring the village clerk to
have incorporated in the notice for spring election, the question of building a public hall at a cost not to exceed $6,000, and that
people vote on the question by simply saying “yes” or “no” on their ballots.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  Saturday morning March 10 at 10:30 o’clock by Rev. Mr. Short, Miss Lucy Moore of this city and
Mr. Frank Holmes of Racine.  The bride is the elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Moore of this city, at whose home the
marriage was performed.  She was reared and educated in this city and has gathered to herself many friends.  The groom is a
resident of Racine where he is employed as a painter in the carriage works.  The happy couple left on the noon train for their new
home in Racine accompanied by the well wishes of many friends.

100 Years Ago (1910):  F. W. Gillman and Clint Scofield left Monday night on a trip to North Battleford, Canada, where they go to
look over the land in that section of the country, and if found suitable will probably invest.  They expect to be gone about ten days.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The third dance of the winter series given under the auspices of the American Legion will be March 17, St.
Patrick’s Day.  The boys have secured Art Mussehl’s Ragadors of Fort Atkinson for the occasion and in addition are promising
some unusual features in the form of special acts to be put on at intermission time.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Miss Justina Crall, daughter of Seth Crall, became the bride of Nile McCaffery, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer
McCaffery, 263 West Main Street, at a ceremony performed at 4 p.m. Friday in the Methodist parsonage, Rockford, Ill  The
occasion was the 30th wedding anniversary of the bride’s parents.  The attendants were Miss Ruth Crall, sister of the bride, and
Victor McCaffery, brother of the groom.  The couple are making their home in the Elizabeth Lehman residence at 121 South Third
Street.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  The state public service commission today granted the application of the Evansville City electric utility to
buy the Northeastern Electric Co., Town of Union, Rock County for $1,200.  The property consists of 3 ½ miles of electric
distribution line serving 13 customers of whom 9 are stockholders of the Northeastern Company.

60 Years Ago (1950):  A University of Wisconsin class in rural sociology has selected Evansville as the site of a community survey
to be made in this spring.  A. F. Wileden, professor of rural sociology will meet with a group of Evansville leaders.  H. H. Cate,
veteran farm training instructor in charge of arrangements has called the meeting to organize a rural community committee.  Prof.
Wileden will address the group on “What Makes a Rural Community Tick?”  The survey is carried out annually.  Several
interested Evansville citizens asked that their community be chosen for this year’s project.

50 Years Ago (1960):   Wisconsin State Patrol Officer Daniel Holzem, Evansville, earned a two-year service bar insignia to wear
on his uniform.  It was announced this week by Capt. Earl Wolff, Madison, district commander.  When an officer completes five
years of service, he is presented with a star insignia.  The state patrol numbers 250 men, stationed throughout Wisconsin.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Two outstanding local basketball players were named to the first All-Central Suburban conference
basketball team.  Daryl Fuchs and Steve Kundert played a big role in the 9-1 conference records and 19-3 season which just
ended.  Coach Richard Muenich was voted the “Coach of the Year.”  His 1968-69 team won the Central Section title with a 13-0
record.  

30 Years Ago (1980): Arlen Butts, age 20 of Evansville, Wisconsin left New York last week on the first leg of 18 days of
agriculture-related visits in six European countries.  It is the second annual FFA trip of its kind to honor award winners according
to FFA officials.  

20 Years Ago (1990):   Just about the time that most people were ready to leave their places of business and head for home, an
unannounced tornado struck the Brooklyn area on March 13th.  It may have been Mary Abey, whose home is on County T, who
was the first to see the tornado that created all the havoc.  About 4 p.m. her outside dog was very upset, she recalls.  At the time
she thought it was the lightening and heavy rain.  About 5 p.m. she was on the phone when she heard what sounded like a train.  
Then she sighted the brownish-black funnel with a tail that touched the ground, coming up the west side of County Trunk T.  
Although the barn on the Patterson farm on Hwy C went down, the very old brick silo remained standing.  Mr. and Mrs. Marvin
Golz were in the basement when the tornado took the roof and twisted their home and flattened the garage.  On the Golz farm,
Phil Golz and veterinarian Blaine Ellison were looking after a sick cow when the twister took the roof off the Golz home.  The
animals in the barn were okay.  On Emery Road, Mrs. Sarah Dunbar was looking out the window at the heavy rain.  About three-
fourths of her house roof blew off and the rest made a U-turn.  “Nothing touched me,” she said.  

10 years ago (2000):    This Lenten season, St. John’s has transformed its sanctuary into a life-size replica of the “Upper room”.  
This scene, made popular by the famous artist Leonardo Da Vinci is being reenacted by members of St. John’s Lutheran Church,
including Steve Verkuilen, Rick Larson, Mike Halvorson, John Verkuilen, Pastor Paul Forde, Dan Drake, David Persons, John
Peterson, Al Hipke and Craig O’Leary.


In Review
Fourth Week of March 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We learn that the prospects of the Evansville Cheese Factory for the present year are better than at any
time before.  Farmers are really waked up to their interest, and while C. H. Wilder has the supervision of this institution, they are
sure that one branch of farming will pay.

130 Years Ago (1880):  We are glad to hear that Mr. U. N. Slawson has concluded to keep his barber shop closed on Sunday.  It
seems to us that people might find time during the week to get shaved and not compel our barbers to keep open shop on Sunday
in order to make a living.  But it is a sad fact that more people visit the shops Sundays than on any other day of the week.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Fred Wilder is yet suffering from his sprained ankle, that a pile of lumber fell over onto, at Baker’s shops,
nearly breaking it.  It is very painful, but slowly improving.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Mrs. Swinson, an aged lady who lived alone in a log house between Cooksville and Dunkirk narrowly
escaped being burned to death Tuesday morning.  In some unknown way the house caught fire and in trying to save her few
belongings, her clothes caught fire and by the time the neighbor, who lived a half mile away, could reach her she was frightfully
burned.  The doctors think she will not recover.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Evansville has a new industry in the New Process Feather Washing Co., which recently moved here from
Stoughton, where they have been doing a very prosperous business for the past eight months.  They are located in the Snashall
building, north of the Bank of Evansville, and we predict for them the liberal patronage of our people.  All ticking washed by hot
water, and each patron’s ticking and feathers washed separate.  [The small building was at 10 North Madison and was razed.]

90 Years Ago (1920):  Schools closed March 24 for the remainder of this week and all of next for the Easter holiday.  This closing
is one week earlier than was expected.  It was necessary in order to repair the boiler in the heating plant.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  Art Spencer narrowly escaped serious injury Monday when a charge of powder exploded unexpectedly
while he was blasting a log on the Peter Doyle farm at the north limits of the city.  Mr. Spencer was straddling the log at the time of
the explosion and was thrown some 15 feet.  He sustained only minor injuries.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Oldest high school boxing tournament in Wisconsin, the Evansville prep ring carnival will be staged here
tonight in the new gymnasium with a program of 30 bouts.  The tournament is being held for the 11th straight year under the
direction of coach George O’Neill who pioneered high school boxing in the state.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Walter Croak, who is 94 and resides here with his nephew and niece, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Maloy on
Garfield Avenue is believed to be the oldest living person who attended the Moore School in Magnolia township.  Mrs. Neva
Peckham, present teacher, and a group of first grade pupils were photographed in front of the school house.  There are now
about four floors in the school house.  The flooring was added throughout the years as the old became worn by the pupil’s feet.  

50 Years Ago (1960):   Census enumerators for this area have been named as follows:  Evansville, Mrs. L. L. Thompson; Mrs.
Ardis Brigham and Miss Elizabeth Baker; Magnolia Township and part of Union, Mrs. Carol Howard; Union Township, Mrs. Oliver
Franklin; Porter and part of Fulton Township, Mrs. Lucy Sayre.  Mrs. Vaughn Petersen is local chairman.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The annual meeting of the Evansville Volunteer Fire Department was held on March 9.  The following
officers were elected:  Fire Chief, Laurence Skoien; Assistant Fire Chief, Leslie Golz; Fire Captain, Charles Nordeng; Fire
Lieutenant, Don Olsen; Secretary, Robert Olsen; Treasurer, William Erbs; Steward, Phil Montgomery; Assistant Steward, Richard
Golz.    

30 Years Ago (1980):  Miss Vicky Vreeland was the guest of honor at a miscellaneous shower Sunday p.m. held in the Weese
Restaurant.  The hostesses were Miss Jana Vreeland, Mrs. Marian Tomlin and Mrs. Weese.  Twenty-two guests were present.  
Miss Vreeland will become the bride of John Rasmussen in April.  

20 Years Ago (1990):   At the regular council meeting the bid for the 300,000 gallon elevated water storage tower was approved.  
CB&I of Naperville, IL was the low bidder at $441,500.  Structure completion time is 240 days which will be sometime in the fall.  
The new structure will allow increased pressure on the line and will accommodate growth in the community and better fire
protection.  The tower will be located on the east side of Evansville behind Ron’s Standard Station.

10 years ago (2000):    At the regular council meeting on Tuesday night of last week, approval was given to grant the liquor
license to Citgo Quick Mart, located on E. Main St. and Union Street.  The action cleared the way for Ron Thornton to sell his gas
station, convenience store business to Ed Francois and close his business on E. Main Street as of last Wednesday.  


In Review
Fifth Week of March 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Mr. R. F. Pettigrew leaves town for Sioux Rapids, Dakota, where he will at once engage in the real estate
business.  Mr. Pettigrew is a young man possessed of life, ambition, and real western pluck, and we have no doubt but that his
success is clearly defined before him.  He is the right stamp to help build up a western town.  May success attend you, Frank.  
[Note.  Richard Franklin Pettigrew was elected to several terms in political offices, first in the Dakota Territory and later in the U. S.
House of Representatives and the U. S. Senate from South Dakota.]

130 Years Ago (1880):  We understand that the Free Methodists will take possession of the Seminary building, April 7th and
proceed at once to repair and add to it preparatory to opening a denominational school.   

120 Years Ago (1890):  Dr. C. M. Smith, Jr., returned home on Wednesday evening a full fledged physician having passed a very
honorable examination as a graduate from the Rush Medical College of Chicago.  We shall look for the doctor to become one of
the best in his profession, believing that he now has all the qualifications necessary to place him in the foremost rank.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Mr. Will Patterson left this morning with his family for their new home in Blue Springs, Neb.  Mr. and Mrs.
Patterson leave behind them in Evansville, many warm friends who regret their departure exceedingly but who wish them
abundant success in their new home.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Citizens, Notice!  You are hereby requested to assist in beautifying our city and improving the health
condition by removing all ash piles, manure heaps, cleaning cesspools, vaults and all other sources of filth.  By Order of Health
Commissioner.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Local politics took a new turn this week and two lively contests are booked for April 6th.  For the office of
mayor there is a contest.  E. H. Libby, the present title holder is up for re-election, while A. E. Harte, alderman, is going to try and
oust him from the office.  Both are good men for the place.  The other contest is for city treasurer between W. W. Gillies, who now
holds that office and P. P. Pullen.  Nay Gillman is the only one out for city clerk.  So far there has been no papers filed for
assessor.  The job is not a very desirable one on account of the cussing you get but the pay is $4 a day for actual time put in.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  W. Daryl Patterson, former local boy who is in command of the S. S. Marinduque in the government coast
and geodetic survey, recently purchased a can of peas from the army commissary in Manila which were packed by the Garden
Canning Company here.  The label on the can read, “Toboggan Brand of Wisconsin Peas, packed by the Garden Canning
Company, Evansville, Wisconsin.”  Mr. Patterson’s work has taken him to Zamboanga, Jolo, which is the smallest “walled in” city in
the world.  While on the Sula islands he called upon the Sultan, was most graciously received, and was permitted to take his
pictures with Mrs. Patterson and the wife of one of the officers.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Fred W. Gillman, 72, one of Evansville’s most outstanding civic leaders, veteran police and fire chief, and
prominent detective of state-wide fame, died unexpectedly at 12:30 p.m. Saturday from a heart attack in his home here at 125
North First Street.  A native of Evansville, Chief Gillman, son of the late Ray and Sarah Fellows, Gillman, was born October 12,
1867 and spent his entire life in Evansville.  Mr. Gillman, who was educated in the city public schools here, was widely known as
second baseman on the city’s baseball team some 40 years ago.  Mr. Gillman was appointed chief of police here in 1918 and with
the exception of a few months, served continuously in that capacity.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Claire Ehle has been appointed census enumerator for the city of Evansville, and Mrs. Phil T. Smith will
take the census in the Town of Union.  They are being trained.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Union Masonic Lodge No. 32 at its regular meeting Tuesday, March 22, honored J. F. Waddell with a 50-
year certificate of membership in the lodge.  Mr. Waddell served as master from 1912 through 1916 during which time the lodge
showed steady growth.  Four of the men who became Masons while Mr. Waddell held the office of master were present at the
ceremony, William Phelps, Jay Brink, H. F. Brunsell, Evansville, and E. O. Evans, Monroe.

40 Years Ago (1970):  At 10:10 p.m. Saturday, the Evansville firemen were called out to a barn fire south of the city at the
intersection of Townsend Road and Old 92.  The building was located on the Charles Dunphy farms and was about one-half mile
from the owner’s home.  It was all in flames before it was discovered by Mr. and Mrs. Dunphy and although  the firemen
responded promptly, the building was beyond saving before they arrived.  The Dunphy barn was used only for storing hay.  
There were about 600 bales in the building, all of which were destroyed.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  The engineering firm of Owen Ayres and Associates has begun the Phase I agreement of the Lake Leota
Development and it appears that this portion of the project will be completed in about three months.  The firm has begun mapping
the area and disposal areas will be looked into in the near future.  It is anticipated some 150,000 cubic yards of silt will have to be
removed from the lake.  Problems involved are the distance the residue must be hauled and over what roads or streets.

20 Years Ago (1990): This year the Evansville Jaycees will hold their annual awards banquet on Saturday, March 31, at the
Evansville Country Club.  This year the Jaycees will be honoring the following five:  Rob Peters, Outstanding Young Adult; Keith
and Debbie Trow, Outstanding Young Farmers’ David Ross, Distinguished Service Award; Jim Pope, Outstanding Young
Individual and Richard Langer, Outstanding Young Educator.

10 years ago (2000):    Candidates for Evansville’s spring election include:  for Mayor, incumbent Mayor Steve DeSalvo and write-
in candidate Jeff Hanson; First Ward alderman, incumbent Paul Baker and write-in candidate Debbie Milbrandt; Second Ward
alderman, Janis Ringhand ; Third Ward alderman, incumbent Robert Gore finishing out the term of Jeff Hanson who resigned,
incumbent Diane Roberts and write-in candidate Barbara Eggum; Fourth Ward alderman, Michael Halvorson and write-in
candidate John Sornson.  Two candidates are running for school board, Donna Haakenson and Ruth Ann Montgomery.   


In Review
First Week of April 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The photograph business has been of the most lively character, in Evansville, the past winter.  Mr. W. H.
Owen has taken 7000 pictures, during the past three months.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Friday, while Mr. C. H. Wilder was digging the cellar for his new dwelling, he received a severe blow in the
side from the handle of a scraper he was using.
120 Years Ago (1890):  While the two little boys of Mr. Dan Rogers were playing ball Saturday, the bat breaking in the hands of
the elder one, sent the full blow against the head of Montie, 8 year old, knocking him senseless.  The boy was taken up and
carried into the house and Dr. Spencer sent for with urgent haste.  When the Doctor arrived the boy began to recover, and an
examination revealed no particular external wound but a terrible contusion.  The Dr. cared for the boy the best he could and
thinks he will recover all right.
110 Years Ago (1900):  Hiram Emery has sold his farm to Ed Hyne for one hundred and ten dollars per acre, and taken as part
payment the Hyne’s property here, which the former is now occupying.

100 Years Ago (1910):  There is so little interest taken in the election in Evansville that there is hardly a contest over any of the
offices.  The only one this year was between Dr. C. M. Smith and Henry Austin in the Third Ward, Mr. Smith being the winner.  
Even the question of park or no park did not inject any life into a dead election, but the park lost by a large majority.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Cozy Café which had the misfortune to catch fire the forepart of the winter is steadily coming to the
front with a new building.  The Graham Bros. have taken hold of the café again and it is booming as it always does when it comes
under their management.  The framework of the building is up and in the near future will be ready for occupancy.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Plans have been completed here for an amateur night and fiddlers’ contest to be held at the Magee
Theatre, Tuesday night April 22.  Cash prizes totaling $30 will be awarded for the best local talent vaudeville specialties, old time
fiddling, guitar, and accordion playing.  Those who have already registered to appear in vaudeville specialties are Christie Ryan
and Betty Groh,Vic Wall, Beth Schuster, Doris Moore, Helmer Olson, Jean Covert, and Clyde Bates.

70 Years Ago (1940):  James Lamb was elected to the office of Chief of Police to succeed the late Fred W. Gilman by a plurality
of 246 votes over his opponent Charles A. Gibson.  Dorothy Richmond easily defeated her opponent, Burton C. Janes for the
office of treasurer.  Receiving a total of 585 votes, A. M. Winn was again placed at the helm of the city by a plurality of 269 over
his closest opponent, Harry H. Loomis, who polled 316.  The third contestant J. B. Coleman was awarded 244 votes.

60 Years Ago (1950):  The Evansville Methodist Church on Easter day was the scene of a beautiful setting of “The Risen Christ
Appearing to Mary,” painted by Mrs. E. J. Gibbs.  Imitation grass was used as a mound and Easter lilies and hyacinth blossoms
placed at the sides set off the pictures with beauty and symmetry.  Powerful spot lights illuminated the whole scene, bringing
home the truth of the Easter Message, “He is Risen.”

50 Years Ago (1960):  The annual Junior Prom will be held Friday, May 6,  9 p.m. to 1 a.m. in the high school auditorium with
music by the Top Hatters.  “Bali Hai” has been chosen as the theme for the event.  King Steve Crull has named Dawn Feldt as
Prom Queen.  Committees and the court of honor will be announced at a later date.

40 Years Ago (1970):  There are five candidates for three positions on the Evansville Board of Education, two of whom are
present incumbents as follows:  David Fellows and Robert C. Kelley.  The three new names appearing on the ballot this spring
are Erwin Zweifel, Dr. Henry Youngman and Kenneth Rabideau.

30 Years Ago (1980):  The Evansville City Council members were informed that the Wisconsin Fund grant for funding Phase II of
the new water treatment plant had been approved.  The grant will cover about 75% of the cost of the design plan and
specifications for the new plant.  

20 Years Ago (1990): The lobby of the Valley Bank of Evansville, located on North Madison Street, has come alive with an
interesting collection of art works by local residents.  Those who have works on display are James McGoey, Joan Sands, Ross
Sperry, Howard “Bud” Cufaude, Jim Patterson, Denny Reese, Dick Krake, Linda Grenawalt-Dean, Dave Turner, Gayle Puhl,
Deanne De La Rond, Jonathan Wilde and Gordon Kazda.  

10 years ago (2000):    Another blackened sky, orange blazing grass drew the curious to the south side of town on Hwy. 213, last
Friday afternoon.  According to Evansville Fire Chief Mike Halvensleben, the fire was called in by a passerby at about 1:30.  
Although conditions are dry for this time of year, the cause has yet to be determined.  About 20 firefighters were on the scene
and within three hours had the fire under control, but were at the scene for a total of six hours.  The prairie is DNR land and was
more extensively burned last year.  Halvensleben estimated the area burned was about one mile long and one mile wide.

In Review
Second Week of April 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The annual election of officers of the Methodist Sunday School took place Sunday, April 3d, and resulted
in the well-merited and unanimous choice of L. T. Pullen, superintendent; C. K. Landers assistant, and David Stevens, secretary
and treasurer.  The school for the past year has been under the charge of Mr. E. R. Sprague, ably assisted by Mrs. E. Robinson,
than whom no better, or more competent persons can be found.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  The election of the Trustees of the Evansville Seminary was held in the bank.  I. M. Bennett, C. H. Wilder,
and Peter Aller, of the old Board remain in the new.  L. T. Pullen was elected to fill a vacancy.  A proposal was entertained from J.
E. Coleman to take charge of the school the next academic year.  The Illinois and Wisconsin Conference of the Free Methodist
Church, are already represented in this project, and it is expected that the Minnesota and Iowa Conferences will be.  This young
denomination, but twenty years of age, has two Seminaries in operation now, one at North Chili, Monroe Co., N. Y., and the other
at Spring Arbor, Jackson Co., Michigan.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  North and west Magnolia were visited with a genuine cyclone Sunday afternoon about five o’clock.  
William Henry Austin had his tobacco shed blown to pieces and Mr. Geo. Bishop had a barn and shed blown to atoms.  Several
other farmers in that section suffered more or less from the wind.  Dark heavy clouds were seen from this place skirmishing in that
direction and it was expected Evansville would be an unwelcome visit, but they sheared off and our people breathed easier.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  April 12, 1900, at noon, by Rev. M. C. Miner, at the Free Baptist parsonage, Miss Della
Thompson and Mr. Philip De Remer, both of the town of Brooklyn.

100 Years Ago (1910):  E. P. Tullis has received the appointment of census enumerator for the City of Evansville and Henry L.
Austin will do the enumerating for the Town of Union.  Census takers will wear a badge with “United States Census 1910.”  The
census starts April 15 and will be completed in 30 days.  Census Enumerator Tullis wishes the wives of the citizens of Evansville
to find out where their husbands’ parents were born, so they can tell him when he visits them.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The friends of Miss Marion Calkins feel a pardonable pride, also a deep interest in her latest adventure
which gives her a place in the author’s world.  Miss Calkin’s story, “Spring in the Ghetto” is given first place in the last number of
The Survey.  The writer is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin and is now engaged in vocational work in one of the New
York City public schools.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The city fire department was summoned to the Garden Canning company’s plant here at 9:30 this morning
to extinguish a lumber blaze.  No serious damage was done.  Sparks from burning brush nearby started the trouble.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Fire originating from a grass blaze at the Charles Gibson residence at 32 West Main Street badly
damaged the Ray Hyne apartment and blacksmith building at the rear of the Rex Theater here at 5:45 p.m. Tuesday.  The grass
blaze crept to the Hyne building and spread like a flash up the walls between the rafters.  Though the fire itself caused but little
destruction, damage from the smoke will necessitate considerable interior redecorating in the second floor Hyne apartment.  A
similar fire damaged the Hyne building last year.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mrs. Roger Collins and infant daughter, Candace Ann, returned home from the hospital Wednesday.  Mrs.
Collins was formerly, Miss Charlotte Brunsell.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Police Chief Richard Luers will attend a police chief school in Milwaukee next Tuesday and Wednesday,
the City Council decided and it also approved the purchase of a new police car for the department.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Ten fires in less than three weeks for a small city is sort of frightening.  Evansville’s volunteer fire
department has been kept unusually busy.  Prompt action on their part has prevented much fire damage in and near the city,
especially in the cases of the several grass fires which spread rapidly.  There were two fires last week, one of which was in the
city dump and was caused by the wind fanning hot ashes.  Friday night firemen were called out to extinguish a blaze in the field
on the Phil Rowley farm on Bullard Road.  The fire Tuesday afternoon was located on the Lloyd Hubbard farm and was confined
to a grass fire.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Local artist Linda Grenawalt had a successful showing of her art work at the Footville State Bank and is
now showing her paintings at the Green County Bank of Brodhead.  Miss Grenawalt is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Grenawalt and is a 1979 graduate of Evansville High School.

20 Years Ago (1990): The Evansville Fire Department held their annual meeting on March 12, 1990.  The following officers were
elected:  Chief, Edd McCaffrey; Assistant Chief, Ken Fuchs; Captain, Scott George; First Lieutenant, Dennis Cooper; Secretary-
Treasurer, Ron Peckham; First Steward, Russ Hall; 2nd Steward, Eric Jorgensen; Publicity, Art Phillips.

10 years ago (2000):    School Board members selected the Master Plan option which includes building a new high school,
remodeling and upgrades to the existing elementary school and middle school and converting the present high school into an
intermediate school serving grades 3-5.  Bray Associates estimates $19.2 million for the new high school; $2.3 million for
mechanicals and a new cafeteria and library at the middle school, and $500,000 for revisions to the elementary school.  The
board voted to include operating costs for the new high school, a swimming pool and a full fly loft for the auditorium among the
questions for the referendum.  


In Review
Third Week of April 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Westward Ho.  Mr. Bela Beebe, started for Iowa last Thursday, taking with him his family and household
goods, what a single team could draw, shipping the more heavy articles by rail.  His destination is not particularly defined, but
inclines to the country west of Des Moines as that best suited to his ideas.  Mr. Beebe is one of our oldest citizens and has many
friends in this part of the state.  His recently family afflictions in the loss of his wife and mother, seems to crowd around him the
usual share of earth’s sorrows.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  Labor of repairing the Seminary building has begun.  Some of the roof timbers having become rotten will
be replaced with new ones and the roof will be otherwise repaired.  The whole building will undergo a complete renovation from
top to bottom.  Mr. Weeber, a carpenter and also member of the board of trustees, with his family, is occupying the building as
tenent.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The “Maid of the Mist” boys desire to express grateful thanks to the Village of Evansville, through its
proper officers, for the nice hose carriage presented to them for the use of their company.  J. W. Morgan & Co., were makers.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Geo. Thurman, of Albany, has traded a pearl with Mrs. Wallace of Chicago, for ten acres of land on Lake
Geneva, and on which is the Idaho building, moved there from the world’s Fair.  He will conduct the property as a pleasure resort.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Adelaide Evans, granddaughter of John M. Evans, M. D., was an editor on the first co-ed newspaper at
the University of Wisconsin, “Chadborne Review.”

90 Years Ago (1920):   Mrs. Carl Olson was surprised when her two brothers from Norway entered her home Saturday night.  
They will work for Mr. Olson this year.  He has taken the Brunsell farm.  (Cooksville news)

80 Years Ago (1930):  The Evansville City Council authorized the Mayor and Clerk to sign Electric Service contracts between the
City of Evansville and Roy Fellows, Clarence Hagan, Charles Gabler, Ole Olsen, Ben Griffeth, Charles A. Taylor, Marvin
Ellingson, John Knudson Jr., Charles Van Wart, Torfin Olsen, Martin O. Fursett and John Wall.

70 Years Ago (1940): Nearly every person living in or near Evansville knows that the Baker Manufacturing Company makes
windmills and gas engines.  But few know that the Su Panda toys which were bought for Christmas presents for their children and
nieces and nephews were made by this same company and hence purchased in the shadow of the factory which manufactured
them.  Su Panda is the creation of J. G. Baker.  The machine which formed the arms, legs, and body of Su Panda were also
designed by Mr. Baker and the first machines which cut the toy were so fast that often the wood was burned in the process.  Men
working at the machines considered them a great hazard and did not relish the thought of manufacturing Sue Panda.  The
machines have now been corrected and the toy is no longer unpopular with the workers.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  The Evansville 4-H club will meet in the City Hall.  Mrs. Fred Abey and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Abey are in
charge of the meeting.  Nineteen new members will be initiated with R. T. Glassco, county agent, in charge.  Serving on the
refreshments committee are Janet Allen, Sue Croft, Katherine Doyle, Betty Dunbar and Patty and Shirley Franklin.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  There is plenty of interest in getting the contract for building the Evansville district’s new school, judging by
the 35 bids made on the project Tuesday.  Bids were opened before about four dozen spectators at the school Tuesday
afternoon.  As they were made, the bids totaled about $25,000 more than the board planned to spend for the building, but it is
expected that various alternatives in the bidding and conferences on changes between the contractors and architects will bring
the figures down to the level estimated before the bidding.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Army Private First Class Theodore K. Kremkoski, son of Alvin J. Kremkoski, Route 1, Brooklyn, recently
received the Purple Heart during ceremonies near Cu Chi, Vietnam.  Pfc. Kremkoski was presented the award for wounds
suffered in action against hostile forces in Vietnam.  The private is assigned as a medical aidman in Company A. 2d Battalion of
the 25th Infantry Division’s 27th Infantry.  The 21 year old soldier is a graduate of Albany High School.

30 Years Ago (1980):  With the addition of the new fire department pumper, a Pierce Suburban pumper using a Ford C-8000
chassis, the Evansville Fire Department has improved its equipment.  The $59,265 pumper allows the pump operator a better
vantage point to watch the fire fighters and direct the water flow.  The new truck can pump 1,000 gallons per minute.  The fire
department members tested the new equipment at Leota Park.  The fire department has also received a $13,800 Chevrolet
pickup, with equipment, known as the “brush buggy,” for use when brush fires occur.  Updating equipment contributes to lower
insurance rates for the community.  

20 Years Ago (1990): Mayor Chris Eager was re-elected Mayor in the April election.  The vote was Eager, 404 and Harlin Miller
375.  Good weather prevailed on voting day, but the turnout was only 779 voters.  The advisory lake referendum drew 515 yes
votes and 247 no votes.   In the Municipal Justice race, Casey Nagy was the winner.  Other votes of uncontested incumbent
council members were:  Larry Dobbs, Ward 1; Richard Modaff, Ward 2; and Ron Buttchen, Ward 3.  

10 years ago (2000):   A school referendum scheduled for May 23 will ask voters to spend $25.5 million on a new high school and
renovations to the district’s three other schools.  The bulk of the cost will go toward construction of a new high school.  In the
coming weeks district officials must convince taxpayers of the merits of the referendum for the district and the community.  
Superintendent Gary Albrecht said the building plan approved by the board allows for growth over the next 20 years and for
future expansion to the new high school.  It also creates an elementary campus and addresses traffic and congestion problems.  


In Review
Fourth Week of April 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Mr. A. H. Robinson has sold his interest in the dentist business to Mr. Taylor (of Carleton & Taylor
Photographers).  Mr. Robinson will carry on the business for Mr. Taylor, and be found ready to serve the public, as usual for
anything in the line of dentistry.  A. H. Robinson, Dentist, makes and repairs all kinds of artificial teeth.  Teeth extracted without
pain by the use of chloroform, ether, or gas, the last of which is perfectly safe.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Married at the residence of the bride’s parents, in Evansville, April 26th, 1880, by Rev. E. Robinson, Mr.
Chas. H. Ladd of Buffalo County, Wis., and Miss Kate H. Winston of Evansville.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mrs. M. A. Hubbard who has spent the winter with her daughter, Mrs. Eugene Bullard, went last week to
her prairie home.  Mrs. Hubbard is getting quite old and does not step as lively as she did twenty-five years ago, but her mind is
active and vigorous as ever, apparently.  Although it is home to her, her children feel uneasy to have her there alone, which she
seldom is allowed to do, and is always glad to have any of her children or grand children come and live with her, yet she does not
find a home like the “old prairie home,” with any.  Mrs. M. A. Hubbard is one of the grand old women of the day, and she has a
warm spot in the hearts of many people in this section.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  April 26, 1900, at 12 o’clock, at the home of the bride’s parents on East Main St., Miss Ella M.
Kuelz of this city and Mr. Charles R. Minch, of Fellows.  Rev. Mr. Eilert officiated.  The bride recently moved to this city with her
parents from Center and has many friends.  The groom is a thriving young farmer and after a couple of weeks in Milwaukee and
Chicago will take his bride to their new home at Fellows where he will work his father’s farm.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Col. G. W. Hall was in Chicago, Tuesday and bought the mate to Charlie, one of the largest elephants in
Ringling’s herd, also lions, tigers and other animals.  All orphans, children and old soldiers will be admitted free to his circus which
appears here in May.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Good Times Club met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Baker Monday evening.  This was an
especially joyous occasion in that E. J. Ballard, who has been ill for about a year, was able to be present.

80 Years Ago (1930):  A declamatory, oratory and extemporaneous reading contest will be held at the high school Tuesday night
with the following competing:  Declamations, Dorothy Earleywine, Lucille Hubbard and Betty Jane Main; orations, Michael Finnane,
Theodore Geisler and Robert Hubbard; extemporaneous reading, Kenneth Ellis, Margaret Baker, and Louise Lindsey.  The
winner of each group will represent Evansville at the district meet to be held at Milton, April 24.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Following a three weeks’ period of installation and remodeling, the pharmacy of the Brown Drug Company,
Inc., in the Grange building will officially opened to the public Saturday, May 4, it was announced this morning by W. E. Brown
manager.  Though the new soda fountain and many other fixtures have not arrived, the store has been open for business here
since Tuesday of last week.  Mr. Brown, who has brought his wife, and infant daughter to Evansville from Sheboygan is residing
here at 15 Mill Street.  A registered pharmacist, he is a graduate of the pharmaceutical course at Marquette University,
Milwaukee. Mr. Brown will be assisted in the store by his wife, a registered nurse and by Kenneth Norby, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ole
Norby, Route 1.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Robert Madding, Richland Center, will succeed Mel Erickson as basketball coach at Evansville High
School, it was announced by J. C. McKenna, Superintendent of Schools.  Coach Erickson recently resigned.  Mr. Madding is a
graduate of the University of Wisconsin where he was a member of the football, basketball and swimming team.  He has also
played semi-pro basketball in his native city.  He served three years in the Navy during the war as a radio operator.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Construction equipment and supplies were being moved onto the fairgrounds site of the new school
building Wednesday of this week and at the same time School District Board Clerk Elizabeth Gray was in Chicago to receive
payment from the bond underwriters.  The $315,000 from the bonds will go into short-term treasury notes and will earn an
estimated $3,000 in interest prior to being paid out to the contractor as construction proceeds.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Meredith, Sr., Route 1, Evansville will mark their golden wedding anniversary
Sunday, May 10th, with an open house to be held at Meredith’s Lounge, hosted by Mr. and Mrs. George Kelly and family,
Evansville, and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Meredith and family, Bettendorf, Iowa.  Richard Meredith and Margaret Finnane were
married May 5, 1920 in St. Paul’s Catholic Church, Evansville.  Monsignor William P. McDermott officiated at the Mass.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Dr. Rodney J. Gray, died April 17, 1980 at the age of 79 at a Madison hospital.  He was born November
18, 1900 in DeForest and attended Beloit College and the University of Wisconsin.  He received his medical degree from the
Washington University Medical School in St. Louis.  Dr. Gray began his medical practice in 1926 in Brooklyn, moving to Evansville
in 1946.  He was recognized by the State Medical Society for 50 years of medical service in 1976.  

20 Years Ago (1990): Marsha Dobbs, proprietor of Dobbs’ Duds, Main Street, excitedly discovered that there were leaded glass
windows hidden behind a partition in the store.  The Dobbs’ ran into a situation where their furnace gave out.  In replacing the
furnace they had to remove a partition at the rear of the store and behind the partition was a long expanse of leaded glass.  The
speculation is that the glass probably was behind the popular soda fountain that exited there.  Before the Dobb’s bought the store
it was a drug store.  (Note:  The stained glass is on display at The Heights in the dining area windows.)

10 years ago (2000):    St. Paul’s Knights of Columbus and the AWARE Agency recently completed their 2nd Annual Easter
Basket Program.  The Easter Program was created to provide Easter dinners to families in need and to help make the holiday a
little more special for their children.  A total of 40 families were served through the Easter program, including 57 adults and 110
children.  

In Review
First Week of May 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  There have been over one thousand maple trees planted in Evansville this spring, mostly along the street
line.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Mr. W. H. Van Hise came in Monday morning, renewed his subscription and ordered the Review sent to
Minden, Nebraska, for which place he started Monday afternoon, by the overland route.  He goes with two teams and Mr. Harry
Hosley and family occupy the third team.  They expect to be some three weeks making the journey.   Mr. Van Hise and his family
have been residents of this town for a number of years, and they have a good many friends who accompany them with choice
expressions of gratitude for health and prosperity in their new home.

120 Years Ago (1890):  There was nothing done here Arbor Day more than any other day, all agreed it was a very pleasant day,
but what of that?  There seems but little necessity for planting shade trees for the place has nearly twice as many as it ought to
have unless they are better distributed.  Many of our people are cutting out what they planted years ago.  The tops and large
branches completely shut out the sunlight obstructing the fine street view.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Mr. Ed. Fellows, of Brooklyn, has purchased the Evansville House, consideration $2,500.  Mr. Fellows will
build a new barn on the premises and it will be occupied by Mr. Chas. Spoor.  The hotel will be occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Fellows
and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gibbs, Jr.  [Note:  The Evansville House was a hotel with a livery barn on the site of today’s Citgo gas
station.]

100 Years Ago (1910):  The Board of Education met at the high school building Friday, April 29, at 4 p.m.  The following teachers
were unanimously elected thus far and accepted the position to which they were elected:  Principal F. J. Lowth, $1,400 per year;
J. F. Waddell, Science, $90 per month; Lilla B. Ludington, English, $75 per month; Hazel North (will not accept) $70 per month;
Grace R. Cady, Latin, $60 per month; Lizzie Gillies, 8th grade, $65 per month; Adeline Campbell, 7th grade $50, per month;
Jessie Kelly, 6th grade, $47.50 per month; Miss Edwards, 5th (not accepted), $45 per month; Nellie Hendricks, 4th grade, $42.50
per month;  Cora Fairbanks, 3rd grade $50 per month; Myrtle Green, 2nd grade, $50 per month; Mae Simmons, 1st grade,
$52.50 per month; Carolyn Hatch, Kindergarten, $55 per month; Mae Phillips, Assistant Kindergarten, $15 per month; Marjorie
Wallace, Music (not accepted), $55 per month.  

90 Years Ago (1920):   The marriage of Margaret M. Finnane, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Finnane, and Richard P.
Meredith, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Meredith, was solemnized in St. Paul’s Catholic Church on Wednesday May fifth.  The full
ritual of the solemn nuptial was carried out with impressive ceremony.  The bride was accompanied by her sister, Miss Juliette
Finnane, as maid of honor; and Mr. Meredith was assisted by his brother, Mr. William Meredith.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  The official census figures as reported to Mayor E. H. Libby give Evansville a gain of 60 in population.  The
new figure is 2,269, as against 2,209 in 1920.  The growth of the city is believed due largely to the development of the Antes
Press which now employs about 50 persons, many of whom have come to Evansville from other cities.  “I received marvelous
cooperation from the citizens of Evansville and met none of the uncivil rebuffs reported by some enumerators,” said Mrs. Walter
Green, local enumerator.  “But of course Evansville has intelligent, self-respecting people who always behave well!”

70 Years Ago (1940):  The Junior Prom will be a brilliant affair.  The evening’s festivities will open at 9 o’clock with three dances
followed by the grand march which will be led by Prom Chairman Mac Wall and his queen, Rosalind Shelby, president of the
Sophomore class.  Following in line will be Albert Holmes, Senior class president and his partner Joan Adams, Madison and Bruce
Townsend, Junior class president and his guest, Angela Bewick.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  R. J. Antes, who has given much time, thought and effort to beautifying the Evansville parks is somewhat
discouraged and just a little bit angry, and with just cause.  R. J. planted and nursed three pine trees for months until they looked
promising only to have some careless, destructive person come along and snap them off.  And that isn’t all, many of the lights in
the shelter house have been broken and the big door has been kicked in at the bottom.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Confirmation services were held at the Cooksville Church Sunday morning, with seven being confirmed:
Carol Hantke, Phyllis Hatlen, Gary Jenson, Dale Kjernes, Robert Martin, Sharon Olson and Sharon Thronson.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  The EHS Junior Class presents “The Coming of Spring” as the theme for this year’s Junior Prom.  The
evening will be set in an oriental mood with Paul Brunsell and Ann Graham presiding as King and Queen.  Their court members
are Sandy Gray, Karen DesRochers, Ilene Pickett, Joan Kelley, Bob Jorgensen, Terry Bund, Bill Krumwide and Chris Heimerl.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  George M. Knuckles, Evansville Superintendent of Schools, has announced his candidacy for Congress
from the 1st District of Wisconsin.  Knuckles will seek the Republican nomination for the seat currently being held by Les Aspin.

20 Years Ago (1990): The Evansville High School music department was well represented at the State Solo/Ensemble contest last
Saturday in Madison.  The first place winners were Libby Kress, soprano;  Rob Peters, piano; Libby Kress and Jeff Updike, duet;
Rachel Mackie, piano; Jeff Updike, bass; the Swing Choir; Libby Kress and Misty Skaaland, duet; Rob Peters and Marty Loftus,
duet; Tara Bradley and Bethany Krake, duet.  Second place winners were Rachel Mackie, cello and Rob Peters, alto saxophone.  

10 years ago (2000):    The Week of The Young Child parade was led by the Evansville Fire Department.  This year’s Grand
Marshall was Ruth Ann Montgomery.  The parade included children dressed as Dalmation puppies; a clown and the Easter
Bunny.  The elementary 3rd & 4th grades got together and formed their own Kazoo band.  A family math night was also held.  


In Review
Second Week of May 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We understand that Mr. Van Hise, of Milton, has purchased a lot, in the Spencer House block, and will
commence at once the erection of a store thereon.  Also that Mrs. Gunn has purchased a lot in the same block and intends to put
up a millinery store.  [Note:  Mr. Van Hise was the father of Charles Van Hise, a noted geologist and president of the University of
Wisconsin.  The Van Hise building is 18 West Main Street.  Sarah Gunn’s building is 16 West Main Street.]  

130 Years Ago (1880):  The only child, son of widow Pinkham, of Union village, about two years old, was drowned in a cistern
near the house Monday forenoon.  The mother is almost frantic with grief.  She has lots two children before and less than a year
ago she lost her husband by being buried in a well he was digging.  She feels now as though her cup of sorrow was full.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The death of Hannah, wife of A. C. Thorp, Esq., took place after a long and painful sickness at their
residence at the head of Main Street, at about 9 o'clock Saturday morning May 10, 1890.  Her age was 49 years in February last.  
Her complaint was a tumorous cancer difficulty.  Mrs. Thorp was a daughter of the late Charles McMillan, one of the early settlers
of the town of Union, and is said to have been the first female born of American parents west of Rock River in the early settlement
of the county.  (Her father having moved and settled in what was afterwards called Union, in 1839.)  Her funeral took place from
the M. E. Church, Rev. W. W. Stevens, pastor, assisted by Prof. J. E. Coleman, at 2:30 o'clock Monday afternoon.  Her coffin was
decorated with a profusion of choice flowers, brought from abroad; one fine wreath of Marshall Neil roses by Mrs. Will Stevens,
and a choice bouquet of white roses, brought by her brother and wife from Oshkosh.  The church was filled as it is not usually
done on a weekday funeral occasion.
110 Years Ago (1900):  June 1st it will be the duty of Mr. Fred Gilman as census enumerator to ask at each home in this city
some extremely pointed questions and it will be the duty of each person to whom these questions are addressed to answer them
in a cheerful, strictly truthful manner.  Questions that will be asked:  Surname, Christian name, initial; residence, street, number of
house; relationship of each member of the head of the family; color or race; sex; age at last birthday; day, month and year when
born; are you single, married, widow, widower, or divorced; number of children; number of children living; sex of children; where
were you born, give state or territory, if foreign birth, give name of country only; where were your mother and father born; what is
your occupation; how many months during the year are you employed; how many months have you attended school; can you
read and write; main facts concerning your education; do you own the house in which you live; if you own the house is it free or
mortgaged; the same questions apply to farmers.  
100 Years Ago (1910):  Although Saturday was not an ideal circus day, being of a windy and rather disagreeable nature, with
occasional showers which interfered somewhat with the performances, the Col. G. W. Hall and Tiger Bill’s shows received a large
attendance.  Both at the afternoon and evening performances large crowds were present and seemed well satisfied.  From here
the show went to Sharon, and from there to other near-by places.  They expect to be at Chicago later in the season.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Antes Press of this city was recently incorporated.  Increased business and personal reasons on the
part of Mr. Antes, the proprietor, have made the incorporation of the firm necessary.  The new firm is composed of Mr. R. M.
Antes, Mr. R. J. Antes and Mr. P. D. Pearsall.  Mr. Antes has been in charge of the Antes Press since its inception here in 1882.  
The Review rejoices in the new venture because the Antes Press has been its home these many years.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  The Juniors’ Prom 1930 promenade was led by Leonard Nelson, president of the Junior class and the
1930 prom queen, Miss Esther Olson.  They were followed in line by LeRoy Geisler, Junior vice president, and his partner, Miss
Norma Frederickson, Beloit; Owen Slauson, Senior president, and his partner, Miss Margaret Baker; Vearle Hockett, Senior vice
president and his partner, Miss Ruth Francis; and Michael Finnane, 1929 prom king and his partner, Miss Veaon Lutz.   Veaon
Lutz and Harold Schuster were in charge of decorations as a project in geometry.  The gym was a riot of colors in geometric
triangles, in violet, rose, apple green, canary yellow, sand, and black crepe paper.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Crews of carpenters, masons, and electricians have been at work here during the past week erecting an
18 by 64 foot addition to the plant of the Badger Coach company on North Madison Street, which firm will utilize the additional
space for the building of the larger models of automobile trailer coaches.  The new addition is of frame structure with concrete
floor and will be faced with brick siding to match the remainder of the plant.  The construction work is in charge of Paul Dehnert,
local contractor, who is also erecting the new Cities Service Gas station at the corner of Main and Madison Streets.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  The 1950 Junior Prom will be held on May 12.  To reign over the dance as king, James Koeneman was
chosen, who in turn asked Jean Butler to be his queen for the evening.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Appearing in “Just Off Broadway,” the spring production of Evansville Little Theater at the High School
Auditorium are Betty Storch, Ginny Schneeberger, Steve Stone, John Hermanson, Melvin Schneeberger, Claude Willoughby,
Patsy Gilbert, Marcia Weaver and Jeannie Luchsinger.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Drs. R. G. Heimerl, C. E. Nelson and H. C. Youngman were in Milwaukee early this week attending the
100th annual session of the Wisconsin State Dental Society, the theme of which was “A Century of Progress.”  

30 Years Ago (1980):  William C. Brunsell, 150 Sherman Court, Evansville, was elected a director of the Union Bank & Trust Co.,
Evansville, Wisconsin, at a regular monthly meeting of the board of directors held May 6, 1980.  Mr. Brunsell will fill the vacancy
created by the death of Forrest T. Durner on Feb. 25th 1980.

20 Years Ago (1990): Randy Keister, Guidance Counselor at Evansville high School, is proud to announce the Valedictorians,
Salutatorian and Honor graduates for the Class of 1990.  Co-Valedictorians for the Class of 1990 are Robert Peters and Dennis
Thiele.  The Salutatorian for the Class of 1990 is Teresa Lappley.  High Honor students are Sandy Manolis, Brenda Harnack,
Heather Hill, Darbie Nieman, Jerry Delzer, Sandra Larson and Joni Hughes.

10 years ago (2000):    EHS Prom for 2000, “Castles in the Stars” will be held Saturday, May 13.  Prom Court members are Heidi
Martin, Emily Langmeier, Angie Beggs, Lindsey Davis, Sarah Behring, Melissa Green, Lindsay Farnum, Tiffany Burner, Carmen
Illichmann, Jessica Rasmussen, Serena Johnson, Chet Heacox, Dustin LaRue, Mike Wyttenbach, Branden Hurtley, Jason Koebler,
Justin Jacobsma, Branden Schmidt, Aaron Gransee, Christian Bennett, Garret Lindemann, and Jered Wourms,


In Review
Third Week of May 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  A new bridge has been built across the mill race, at Madison Street crossing.  It is built on substantial
stone abutments, well planked, and a good painted rail.  The thing sits a little askew but it is owing to the stream not running at
right angles with the bridge.

130 Years Ago (1880):  The engine boys have at last got a hammer to sound their fire alarm with.  It is a heavy iron sledge,
attached to the place of usage by a long iron chain.  Small boys are cautioned against meddling with it save when other people
holler “fire”.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Dr. C. M. Smith, Jr., was called to Cooksville Saturday night to attend triplet childbirth of Mrs. Hans P.
Anderson.  A boy was born at 1:15; a girl at 6 o’clock and a boy at 6:30 a.m.  Total weight 16 lbs.  The youngest, a boy, lived but
24 hours to enjoy the blessings of this world, the other two with parents are getting along nicely.  At this rate of increment
Cooksville will soon recover her lost population and add considerably to the census roll.  Although we have physicians in this city
who have practiced for 30 and 40 years in this vicinity they state that they never have attended a case of triplets. It is useless for
us to wish the happy parents success and prosperity for they are certainly assured of that.
110 Years Ago (1900):  The public schools were closed during the scarlet fever scare and the janitor had to fumigate and clean
the building before school went back into session.  Clifford Pearsall has been quite ill with scarlet fever.  Miss Hartley is nursing
him.  The quarantine was removed last Saturday from Rev. Lee’s and M. J. Fisher’s home.  All are glad to have these shut-ins
about again.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Fellows Station news:  Our new telephone line is to be built this week; it is owned by eight farmers,
Herman Fenrick, William Gunlach, Tom Frusher, Lew and Fred Fellows, Foncie Collins, William Stevens and Ole Berg and it has
Evansville’s central.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Mr. Brown who has charge of the historical library at Madison was in Evansville.  He selected many civil
war and ancient relics from the house of John Evans which he will place in the historical library.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Mrs. F. O. McKinney, Evansville’s only Gold Star mother, sailed yesterday from New York on the S. S.
President Harding for France where she will visit the grave of her son, Harry, the first Evansville soldier to be killed in action.  He
was struck by a shell that burst overhead while he was eating breakfast on the battle front May 20, 1918.  The soldier, after whom
the Evansville post of the American Legion is named was buried in the American Cemetery, No. 176, at Villers Touruelle, Somme.
70 Years Ago (1940):  Raymond D. Holm, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Franz Holm, and Edwin A. Hatlen, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Hatlen, both residing here on route 1, have passed preliminary tests at the United States Recruiting substation in Rockford and
will be sent to Chicago for final examination.  If medical tests at Chicago are satisfactory, the two men will be enlisted in the United
States Navy and transferred to the naval training station at Great Lakes, Ill., for 12 weeks’ preliminary training before further
assignment to a navy technical school or to duty on board a ship of the United States fleet.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Some two years ago Oscar Hatlen lost his pocketbook on the J. B. Larsen farm.  Last Monday afternoon
while plowing one of the fields on the farm, Mr. Larsen’s plow unearthed an object that looked like a piece of leather.  He
examined it and found it to be a pocketbook.  The pocketbook at the time it was lost was supposed to have contained somewhere
around $350.  When found it had several bills, in large denominations and some silver coins.  These bill will be sent in to the
United States Treasury for possible recovery and salvage.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Fifteen years of often frustrating efforts will be brought to an end Saturday, May 21, 1960, with the official
dedication of Evansville’s new post office building.  Evansville’s new building has been built under a leasing plan.  Under this plan,
post offices are built to government specifications by private capital.  The government then leases the building for a specific
period of time.  Under this plan the property stays on the tax rolls.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Wayne Disch, 40 is recovering in the Madison General Hospital from severe burns he received at 2 p.m.
last week Wednesday when his plane crashed and burst into flames.  Disch owned his own plane and has recently had it
repaired.  He was flying over the Disch farm west of Evansville and as the plane fell it was noticed by Steve Pestor.  He and his
brother Dave hurried to the scene of the accident, helped put out the fire and summoned help.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  According to Tom Kerkenbush, director of the Evansville Summer Park program, planning is now beginning
for the program which will run from June 9th to August 1.  Assisting Kerkenbush this year are Randy Hatlen and Todd Sperry.  

20 Years Ago (1990):  Officer Scott McElroy will be representing the Evansville Police Department again this year.  Scott will be
running for a good cause in the Wisconsin Law Enforcement Torch Run Special Olympics on June 7, 1990.  

10 years ago (2000):    Senior Amber Van Galder and Junior Dan McGoey will be performing with the First Brigade Band.  The
Civil War Band will be at Evansville High School on Saturday May 20 at 7 p.m.  The two Evansville high school students will
perform with the symphonic band and don authentic attire for a historical trip to the music of the Civil War.  


In Review
Fourth Week of May 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We learn that Rev. J. Snashall has resigned the pastorate of the Baptist church with the expectation of
removing to Missouri.  His successor is not yet named.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Police Justice Mills informs us that there has not been a single case before him for a number of weeks,
for intemperance or disorderly conduct.  He does not mention this fact boastingly, but for the morals of our people, and for the
moral sentiment of the law, when he has it to administer.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Once more we call the attention of the public to the exhibit given in the high school building, Thursday,
June 6th, from 2 to 4 p.m.  Each pupil’s final examination papers will be placed upon his desk for exhibition, together with maps,
drawing books, and other written works, completed during the year.  Needlework, painting, and various kind of decorative work will
be displayed.  
110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  by Rev. W. W. Stevens at his home in Janesville, Wednesday afternoon, May 23, 1900, Miss
Emma Apfel and Mr. Clarence Bullard, both of this city.  The happy couple were attended by Miss Alice Libby and Chas. Weaver,
also of this place.  They will spend the week visiting relatives at Rockford and Chicago and return to make Evansville their home.  
They have the best wishes of a large circle of friends.

100 Years Ago (1910):  The graduating exercises of the Evansville High School will begin next Sunday evening.  The class this
year contains sixteen members, nine boys and seven girls, who graduate from the several courses as follows:  Modern classical
course, Helen D. Brunsell, Clara M. Hoskins, Margaret Johnson, Clifford J. Pearsall, Will E. Tomlin, Nina M. Worthing; German
scientific course, Hugh H. Ahara, Byrl E. Ballard, Hazel M. Courtier, Forrest T. Durner, Ellsworth E. Lee, Harold S. Theobald,
Arthur E. Tomlin, Jessie M. Kingdon; English course, Earl A. Potter, and Grant Howard.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Graham Brothers’ Cozy Café caught fire by the explosion of a gas stove at 3 o’clock Sunday morning
while Walter Graham was serving lunch to some boys.  A new supply of goods was destroyed with the building.  A small insurance
was carried on the building.  This is the second time the building has burned by the same cause within 5 months.  It was run by Al
Cratzer.  The Graham Brothers do not yet know whether they will rebuild or not.

80 Years Ago (1930):  A class of 46 students will receive diplomas at the commencement exercises at the Evansville High School
gymnasium.  With the highest class average for a period of four years, Ruth Smith has earned the distinction of being class
valedictorian, and Kenneth Lay, whose average is second highest, has been named salutatorian.  The next four highest in rank
who received more than 50 honor points are Margaret Baker, Robert Hubbard, Kathryn Kemmett, Owen Slauson, and Harold
Porter.

70 Years Ago (1940):  At the regular meeting of the Evansville 4-H Club held here Friday night in the City Hall, Doris Golz,
Charlotte Brunsell, Maurice Reese, and Orson Hunt were chosen captains for the annual county 4-H picnic.  Miss Golz will head
the girls’ kittenball entry from Evansville; Miss Brunsell, the volleyball; Reese, boys’ kittenball; and Hunt, boys’ volleyball.

60 Years Ago (1950): Making memorial poppies to be worn in honor of the war dead on Poppy Day, May 27, is providing
employment for thousands of disabled veterans in hospitals throughout the country, according to Mrs. Marion Jones, Poppy
Chairman of the Evansville Unit of the American Legion Auxiliary.  Poppies which will be worn here are being made by patients at
the Wood V. A. Hospital in Milwaukee.   The flowers are made of crepe paper and are accurate representations of the wild
poppies of France and Belgium, which grew in such profusion on the battlefields of both world wars.  The “Flanders Fields” poppy
has been the memorial flower of all English speaking countries ever since the First World War.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Victor Rasmussen and Lester Trunkhill were seriously injured Tuesday afternoon when a scaffolding they
were on, broke and let them fall.  The accident happened while the men were at work on the house being built by the Jay Feldt’s
on West Main Street.  Both men were taken to the Stoughton hospital by ambulance.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  The following are the honor students of the class of 1970, Janis Holm, Jay Johnson, Theresa Schnell
Newport, Shirlee Christensen, Paula DesRochers, Alice Manthey, Jacqueline Bone, Corrine Algrim, Sandy Kuelz, Leonard Eager,
Marcia Haakenson, Linda Polich and Daryl Fuchs.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Commencement exercises will be held this Sunday, June 1, at 2 p.m. in the high school gym for 117
graduates.  Sonja Hagen, valedictorian, and Scott Brunsell, salutatorian, will give the commencement addresses.  High honor
students of the class are Carolyn Jordan, Tamara Moe, Kathi Drefahl, Carol Garbrecht, Gale Yoerger and Amy Pratt.  Honor
students are:  Michael Petterson, Jeanne Olson, Michael Flesch, Michael Franklin, Patti Elmer, Mary Peterson, Mitzi Fenrich
Heath, Julie Haakenson, Darcy Golz, Irma Steinhoff, Cynthia Bollerud, Glen Yoerger, Jeffrey Hawkinson, Peter Manke, Gerald
Forstrom, Carmen Baumberger and Susan Cromheecke.

20 Years Ago (1990): Blackhawk Technical college will hold graduation ceremonies May 24.  The following area women will be
graduating from the Associate Degree in Nursing:  Kristina Kjundle will be employed at Beloit Memorial Hospital; Laurie Fesenfeld-
Muchow will be employed at UW Hospital in Madison; Diana Neuenschwander will be employed at Rock County Health Care
Center in Janesville; and Linda Piper will join the staff at Mercy Hospital.

10 years ago (2000):    Dr. Gary Albrecht arrived at 10:20 p.m. at the “School Referendum Thank You Party” held at the Red
Barn with the news that the ballots had been counted and the unofficial results showed that question number 1, requesting 25.5
million for the upgrades, renovation, and construction to all three existing schools and for a new high school had passed by more
than 100 votes.  Question number two, which asked for the increase of operating costs by $775,000 passed with less than a 30
vote-margin.  Question three for a $2.2 million swimming pool, along with question 4, the pool operating costs, failed.  The totals
for question 1 were 1,307 yes and 1117 no.   



In Review
First Week of June 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We learn that Rev. J. Snashall has resigned the pastorate of the Baptist Church with the expectation of
removing to Missouri.  His successor is not yet named.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Mr. D. H. Page has sold his 12 acre lot, just out the western limits of town, to Mr. J. F. Howard, of
Magnolia, for $2,200.

120 Years Ago (1890):  There was a delightful contrast between Memorial Day this year and last.  Last year men wore overcoats
and mittens, and women were closely wrapped in their winter suits; this year “gauzy” garments were oppressive under the sun’s
pouring rays.  The next morning after Memorial Day last year, snow fell to the depth of several inches.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Belle Boyd, the rebel spy, has rented rooms on the second floor of Mr. I. A. Hoxie’s building.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  T. C. Richardson and the others who went to Western Canada with him, returned last Friday.  Mr.
Richardson likes that country very much, for a new country, and states that he wouldn’t mind living there.  A deal has been closed
by the syndicate for 10,000 acres of land out there.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Dear Comrades of the American Legion:  The G. A. R. wishes to thank you for the kindness shown us on
Memorial Day, helping us decorate the graves of our fallen heroes of the G. A. R.  We feel glad to think we have as many young
comrades to take our place in decorating their graves.  We kindly thank you for taking us to the cemetery and bringing us back to
the opera house to hear the good address from Elder Stephens.  The Relief Corps thanks you also.  With kind regards to you all
we remain as ever, F. C. L.  Commander of T. F. Sutphen Post G. A. R.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The Evansville High School baseball team is undefeated this season.  Members are Stanley Sperry,
Robert Hubbard, Maurice Apfel, Vearle Hockett, Roy Sands, Lawrence Merrill, Clifford Fellows, Lloyd Mabie, Leo McCaffery, Ben
Hubbard, Norman Odegaard, Kenneth Cain, Robert Cain, Norman McCaffery, Lester McCaffery, Leonard Nelson,  Coach Peter
Finstad, Manager Paul Dooley and Assistant Manager, Donald Wissbaum.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Mr. and Mrs. Chester Hurd, Evansville, have announced the marriage of their daughter, Betty Jean, to
Archie George, son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd George, also of Evansville, on May 19 in Dubuque, Iowa.  Mr. and Mrs. Robert Allen of
Evansville attended the couple.  Mr. and Mrs. George will make their home in Evansville.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Miss Hazel Murphy has completed her 25th year of teaching in the Tupper school northeast of Evansville.  
The first year she was ill and missed four days, but during the past 24 years, she has been neither absent nor tardy.  During the
time she has taught in the district, more than 100 of her pupils have been graduated from 8th grade and entered high school,
most of them the Evansville high school.  Several of them have been among the senior groups receiving high honors when they
graduated from the local high school.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Prof. John H. Wilde, 335 South First St., has been named chairman of the Department of Art Education at
the University for the 1960-61 school year.  Wilde was recently promoted from associate professor to a full professorship at the U.
of W.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Bob Hrdlicka, a starting outfielder for the Stout State University baseball team, has earned a baseball letter
this season.  Hrdlicka, a 1968 graduate of Evansville High Schoo, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Hrdlicka, 421 Cherry St.,
Evansville.  His coach Robert Thompson said, “Bob has the potential to be an excellent college baseball player and I am sure that
he will be.”  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Lyle and Borg Viney, Evansville Dairymen and Brown Swiss cattle breeders, were honored at a dinner in
Madison, Tuesday night, May 27.  The occasion was prompted by Viney’s retirement from the post of president of AMPI’s central
division.  He had served in various capacities with the AMPI including the national board of directors.  

20 Years Ago (1990): Evansville High School Varsity Baseball team for 1990 included:  Jeff Updike, Dan Courtier, Jeff Kersten,
Jeremy Dwyer, Derek Topp, Mike Brickl, Tony George, Sid Badley, Matt Trunkhill, Chris McCoy, Craig Dammen, Dan Runaas,
Steve VonBehren and Mike Maves.  Evansville High School Girls Softball team for 1990 included: Colleen Rowley, Tara Schmidt,
Shannon Maves, Renae Bratzke, Angie Rowley, Jamie Shotliff, Lisa Kerten, Shelly Woodstock, Alyson Ford, Heather Weigand,
Kelly Williams, and Katie Buttchen.

10 years ago (2000):   Each year the Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth recognizes students who achieved
particularly high standards in the Midwest Talent Search for Young Students.  These young people are in the top one percent of
all students nationally at their grade level.  Sixth grader Christina Peterson and Eighth grader Adam Patterson were among the
students recognized at special ceremonies.   Both students are eligible for many Saturday, Summer, and Scholarship
opportunities throughout the remainder of their public school career.

In Review
Second Week of June 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  New Livery Stable.   Having fitted up the building formerly occupied by Allen Baker as a blacksmith shop,
and added extensive stabling, I am prepared to furnish as good a turnout as is kept in the country.  The size of the main building
is 36 x 50, 22 ½ feet high; in the rear of this a barn is already built 28 x 30 feet, making a total length of 78 feet; by far the largest
building in town.  Having large and comfortable carriages, I can afford every accommodation to private parties and excursionists.  
Martin R. Case.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  Married.  Hatfield – Rowley.  At the M. E. Parsonage, May 30, 1880, by Rev. C. E. Goldthorp, Mr. E.
Hatfield of Union to Miss Wealthy L. Rowley of Magnolia.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. A. C. Gray commenced taking the census of this place June 3, and the same work was commenced
over this entire United States.  Mr. Gray tackled Homer Potter, a former enumerator, for the first one, Monday morning, and
succeeded in getting down some half a dozen or more, for the first day’s trail.  He wants to get the hang of the business better
before he goes among farmers or old soldiers.  A. C. Gray took the census a part of one day and returned sick and has been
scarcely able to leave his house since, or is unable to pursue his work and W. H. H. Johnson has been appointed in his stead,
who will complete the enumeration.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  Mr. Caleb Snashall and family are going to First Lake next week to spend some time in their new cottage.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Union.  School closed very quietly here on Friday noon last.  Usually a picnic is held on the lawn the last
day, but on account of the hurried preparations on the part of the teacher, Miss Emma Holt, of Brooklyn, to start Tuesday for her
trip to Washington, D. C., the picnic was not held this year.  Miss Holt will be employed indefinitely in census work.  Miss Holt has
taught the school here for three years and was well liked by all her pupils.

90 Years Ago (1920):  Citizens of this community were jolted out of their usual self-satisfied complacency on the morning of June
fourth when it was announced that the dangerous Bellman-Williams garage fire that had threatened for a time to engulf a large
part of the city, was not of accidental origin.  Excitement was intense and much indignation was expressed.  Both members of the
concern were placed under heavy bonds at once.  The court hearing for Mr. J. S. Williams and Mr. Edward Bellman was set for
Friday, June 11.  Mr. Williams, in his examination, pleaded guilty to the charges made by the State Fire Marshall.  Mr. Bellman
denied all claims of guilt made against him.   

80 Years Ago (1930):  Mrs. Edith Searles and Mrs. Catherine Graves are opening a new tea room at 339 East Main Street.  It will
be called “The Shady Nook Tea Room” and will be open to the public.  The proprietresses will serve lunches of all kinds catering
to private parties and will take order for home baking.

70 Years Ago (1940):  John Barrenger, Evelyn Hansen, Dawn George and Charles Davis of Magnolia Corners school; Robert
Harnack, Ruth Schroeder, Virginia Fenn, Rita McGuire and Dora Jane Wendall, Cainville school will receive their diplomas at rural
school graduation exercises held in the Janesville High School, Tuesday afternoon this week.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mrs. Alvin Golz was elected president of the American Legion Auxiliary to succeed Mrs. Phil Roberts at a
regular meeting held Monday night in the Legion rooms.  Other new officers are Mrs. Arnold Willis, second vice president; Mrs. R.
J. Antes, treasurer; Mrs. Jerome Matson, secretary; Mrs. L. L. Thompson, historian; Mrs. Floyd Benway, chaplain; Mrs. Harry
Roderick and Mrs. Don Thompson, color bearers; Mrs. Roderick and Mrs. John Wyse, delegates to the state convention and Mrs.
Thompson and Mrs. Golz, alternates.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Fifty-four seniors were graduated from the Evansville High School Tuesday night, as a standing-room only
crowd of parents and friends watched the traditional exercise.  The graduation also marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of Supt.
John C. McKenna’s leadership of the local system.  Diplomas were presented to the seniors by Clark Prudhon, director of the
school district board.

40 Years Ago (1970):   The Dist. No. 6 board of education met Monday night and salary negotiations were approved.  It was
announced that the base pay will be $7,100 reflecting an increase of $400 across the board at each training level.  The business
manager will receive an 8.6 per cent increase; clerical, 7.8%; cafeteria, 6.8% and health clerk, 5%.  Contracts for four new
teachers, William Kober, Anne K. Biasell, Georgiana Rattan, and Carol Heinemann were approved.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Although a small community, Evansville is always in the forefront for ideas for the betterment of its
citizenry.  One such innovative idea was brought to Evansville from Rockford by Chief Richard Luers.  This is the establishment of
an Evansville Police Chaplain Organization.  The Ministerial Association will decide who, and when, and what hours that they will
be available.  Chief Luers believes in using the well trained cadre of clergy to help the police in meeting the needs of people
during crisis.  Those who will be on call for a week at a time will be Rev. Wallace Harless, Rev. I. Dean Jordan, Rev. Robert
Garbrecht, and Father Thomas Lourim.  The clergy will have a pager, so that they may be reached easily.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Commencement ceremony took place at the Evansville High School on Sunday, June 2, as the class of
1990, donned in caps and gowns, paraded before parents, relatives and friends to receive diplomas and awards culminating their
years at EHS.   A total of $118,075 in scholarships was presented to outstanding and worthy seniors to be used to advance their
education.

10 years ago (2000):   The resignation letter of J. C. McKenna Middle School Principal, Vince Maloney, was read and accepted
last night, June 12th at the regular monthly school board meeting.  Maloney served the Evansville School district as Middle School
Principal since the mid-70’s.  


In Review
Third Week of June 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Those in favor of celebrating the Fourth in an appropriate manner, met at the office of Jacob West Esq.,
and after the appropriate organization, resolved that we have a Fourth of July Picnic Celebration and elected the following
persons as committee to make further arrangements and to report at this office the following evening:  W. B. Winston, Dr. C. M.
Smith, L. T. Pullen, A. Adams, D. H. Pratt.  It was resolved to have a basket picnic, each providing refreshments for himself and
invited guests.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  Mr. Potter is almost through with his census taking.  He thinks the town population will hardly come up to
the figures we have always set for it.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The Grange Store finding their country business so increased that it required additional hitching posts,
extended them past their store out on the west side of Railroad Street almost down to Church, past the residence occupied by
Mrs. Eugene Williams.  Mrs. Williams objected and no heed being taken of her importunities she obtained help and had them all
yanked up.  The next time she appeared at headquarters she suggested that a new dress from that institution was hers by rights
of removing sundry annoyances from her front yard.  In the last act as well as in the first one, she came off equally victorious.  
[Note:  In 1890, the Grange Store was located at 19 East Main and today’s Maple Street, was Railroad Street.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  The following paragraph clipping from the Milwaukee Sentinel refers to one of our residents who had
made this her home for a few months.  While away on one of her frequent trips she suddenly succumbed to a malady induced by
overwork.  Kilbourn, Wis:  June 11—Belle Boyd, the famous spy of Confederate fame, died suddenly of heart disease in Kilbourn
tonight.  She was to have given a lecture Wednesday night and came here from Portage Saturday.  She had not been well,
though was not thought to be in unusual health.  Today she was engaged in her usual occupation.  She was taken with a sinking
spell and told her husband she was dying.  In a few moments she was dead.  She was 57 years of age and had been giving
lectures in this part of the state.

100 Years Ago (1910):   The graduating class of the Evansville Seminary consisting of the following seven boys and girls, Jennie
Jones, Eleanor Eskins, Freda Johnson, Cora Drafahl, Jay Frost, Harold Lewis and Seymour Watson all delivered their carefully
prepared orations in a very creditable manner.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The final chapter of one of the most sensational affairs that have come in the history of this community
was written on last Monday when Mr. Williams of the Bellman-Williams Company, was sentenced to five years in the State Prison
at Waupun .  The sentence was but the expected ending of the affair after Mr. Williams by his corrected confession explained that
because of the strong arm methods of his examination in the first examination he implicated his partner in the nefarious work of
which he was accused.  A plea of insanity was made by the legal representatives of Mr. Williams, but after medical advice was
had, the Court refused to consider the plea and sentence was imposed.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The Lions Club has appropriated the sum of $100 for the erection of a 12-foot water slide to be built on
the north shore of Lake Leota west of the bathing house.  It will be erected by C. E. Winston.  The ground at the base of the slide
will be graveled and sanded.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Martin, “Bud” Anderson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Anderson, 226 West Liberty Street, who was
graduated last week from the State Teachers’ college, La Crosse, has accepted a position as physical education and swimming
instructor at the new South Park Avenue Junior High School in Oshkosh.  Anderson will assume his new duties at the opening of
the school’s fall term in September and will be in charge of nearly 500 students in physical education.  He will also coach football
and basketball and will have charge of the school’s intramural program.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Evansville was very fortunate to have the Rock County School Committee come Tuesday night and explain
the work they have done in redistricting school districts in Rock County.  The committee has set up a tentative plan for
redistricting Rock County.  There will be, under this plan, seven school districts.  Each district will have one high school.  The
seven districts will be Evansville, Orfordville, Edgerton, Milton, Janesville, Beloit and Clinton.  In order to get the best education,
each district must have a sufficient number of people and sufficient equalized valuation.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  The first Evansville tennis tournament is being planned by a committee including Richard Eager, Dave
Losey and Mick Finnane.  Those interested in playing are asked to get in touch with the committee immediately.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The Miss American Teen-ager contest was held Saturday night.  Evansville will be represented in the state
contest by Miss Nancy Thompson, 17, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Thompson.  Sandra Kuelz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Kuelz, was the runner-up.

30 Years Ago (1980):  The Evansville 4-H Club crowned their 1980 Queen at their regular meeting.  Julie Haakenson will reign
over festivities locally and also will be a candidate for the Rock County 4-H Fair Queen.  Last year’s queen, Kelly Woodworth
crowned the new queen.

20 Years Ago (1990):  The school board on Monday night approved the sum of $36,578 to be appropriated for 40 Panasonic
computers for the high school business department and one computer graphic for the Industrial Arts classes.  The funds will come
from the debt service account.  The computers will be compatible with the IBM system and they will be able to network them.  The
presently owned Apple computers will be moved to K-8 for their use.  Board President Greg Whitmore said there is no choice
anymore, that the need is there to keep up with the world and other schools.

10 years ago (2000):   A Radio Shack store and flower shop will soon be located in an addition off Ringhand’s Meat & Liquor.  
The Evansville Plan Commission approved a conditional use permit for Ringhand to construct a 3,200 square foot addition to his
store located at the corner of East Main Street and Water Street.  The additional would hold two businesses; a 2,400 square foot
Radio Shack electronics store and 800 square foot Flowers for All Occasions.


In Review
Fourth Week of June 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  A public dinner will be gotten up by the ladies of the Congregational Church and society, of Evansville, to
be served at Mr. Martin B. Case’s new building on Main Street.  Also, side tables, where will be sold ice cream, lemonade and
strawberries (if to be had.)  To which we invite general patronage from all who may wish a good dinner on that day.  Give us your
patronage friend, to serve in a good cause of generous benevolence to the society and to the community generally, no less than
putting a steeple on the Congregational Church.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Mrs. Elijah Robinson returned Saturday after six weeks absence at Rome, N. Y., where she has been
treated for cancer.  She is feeling quite smart, and is confident of an entire and permanent cure of that disease. She has
congratulations of a host of friends, for her safe return.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Lamont and his crew of men, tore up and commenced putting down a concrete walk on the north and
west sides of A. S. Baker’s residence.  [Note:  A. S. Baker lived at 39 West Liberty Street.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  Letters have been received from Mr. Eager and Messrs Geo. and Fred Clark of their pleasant voyage
and safe arrival at Hamburg the 8th.  They were on the water nine days.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Mrs. John Robinson and daughter, Olive, attended the commencement exercises at the Oberlin College,
at Oberlin, Ohio, Miss Madge Robinson being one of the graduates from the kindergarten course.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Classifieds:  Borrowed from my lot on Garfield Ave., a drag, about three weeks ago.  Will the one who
borrowed the drag please return it at once.  If not, I shall hunt the matter up.  J. C. Apfel.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Old Glory lined the streets of Evansville Saturday in honor of its own anniversary.  Although there was no
marked celebration, everyone knew from the banner’s appearance that is was flag day.  The day was observed because on that
day in 1777, the Continental Congress passed the first flag act and designated the style of flag as we have it today except for the
fact that with each new state a star has been added.   The original plan was to add another stripe for each new state but it was
soon found that the banner would become too bulky.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  The Columbus Food Corp., known as the Evansville Canning Factory, is in operation with the packing of
early peas here, Manager Earl Gibbs announced Friday.  A crew of 125 is on duty.  Gibbs said there are about 800 acres of peas
under cultivation and another 300 acres of late peas coming.  The firm now maintains 11 viner stations in different communities
here, he said.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  According to information received here early this week by Mayor A. M. Winn, the population of Evansville is
now 2,530, a gain of 209 in the past ten years.  Beloit and Evansville led the county in population gains on a percentage basis.  
Beloit’s was 16.46 per cent and Evansville’s was nine per cent.  In 1940, Evansville’s population was 2,321.

50 Years Ago (1960):  The Dutch elm disease has invaded the Evansville area and is killing a number of elms within the City
limits.  It is the most devastating disease of elm trees.  This disease is transmitted to healthy elms by tiny beetles which breed in
the bark of dying and dead elm wood.   Your City officials are organizing a control program with all possible haste, but until such a
program can be put into operation the cooperation of all residents is urgently needed.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. Paul Gibbs and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Gibbs have purchased Graham’s Cozy Café and the latter
couple is operating the restaurant.  The new name is Gibb’s Dogwagon Café.  The business has been owned and operated by
members of the Graham family since 1910 and for the past many years by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Graham.

30 Years Ago (1980):  On Sunday, June 15, the members of the Congregational Church of Christ voted unanimously, after their
regular service, to extend a call to Rev. Mark X. Pirazzini.  Rev. Pirazzini is a 1980 graduate from Andover-Newton Theological
School and is a 1977 graduate of St. Olaf College.  His wife Meredith also graduated from St. Olaf’s where she majored in English
and German.  Currently she is a type-setter for the New England Journal of Medicine.

20 Years Ago (1990):  It started raining early Saturday morning and kept on all day.  But despite the rain more than 3,800 people
turned out to enjoy the pancakes, ham, ice cream, milk, cheese and strawberries at the Mel Janes Farm, located on Cemetery
Rd.   Serving in the machine shed and food preparation in a tent helped to diminish the rain problems, but the crafters had a
difficult time with their wares.  Mud also became a problem as the rains proved quite heavy at times.  Horse drawn rides continued
and the band played on, so a good time was had by all who attended.

10 years ago (2000):   A community of bespectacled, white-haired property owners attended the Tuesday June 13th Council
meeting with concerns about the upcoming Garfield Avenue road construction.  The reconstruction which is included in Evansville’
s 5-year road plan, encompasses 1,000 feet of road work, water main work, and new curb and gutter on both sides of the street
from 3rd to 4th Streets, and is slated to begin in mid-July, with completion in October.  Residents were concerned about charges
for curb and gutter, sidewalks, grading of yards, and trees that might be cut down.


In Review
Fifth Week of June 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  On Monday night of last week the store of D. H. Pratt was entered by burglars and several pieces of
goods taken from the shelves and all the cash from the money drawer.  The amount taken as far as can be ascertained is about
fifty dollars.  On the night previous, a store was entered in Brodhead and goods stolen, also at Stoughton on the following night.  
Somebody is traveling in the business.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Mr. Earle Woodbury died at Cooksville, Tuesday, June 15th, 1880, in the 80th year of his age.  Mr.
Woodbury moved from Wethersfield, Vt., with his family, in Nov. 1849, and settled in Cooksville, where he remained until his
death.  He bought with him a pretty fair property but lost it mostly some years ago in a mercantile venture.  His wife died some
years ago.  His family are all married and live in this place and Cooksville, save one son in California and a daughter in Little
Rock, Ark.  Owing to some confusion of telegrams, in communicating the deceased’s request to Rev. Jenk L. Jones of Janesville,
no funeral services were held.  Deacon Gillies offered a simple but fervent prayer.  His remains were deposited by the side of
those of his wife.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The time is drawing near for our annual School meeting.  Our children are our treasures, and where as
women should leave no stone unturned to further their good and to help make our schools as strong and powerful as possible.
Let every lady remember that she has a perfect right to say whether we have an enlarged school room or good ventilation or free
text books.  These questions are coming up and a note will be taken.  We hope that every woman will be found in her place at the
next school meeting the first of July.   

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  June 21, 1900 at eight o’clock by Rev. Mr. Short, Miss Eliza Cleland and Mr. John Baker at their
home, corner of Church and Park Streets, this city, in the presence of about one hundred invited guests.  After the ceremony a
dainty repast was served by the bride’s Sunday School class.  They left amid showers of rice and roses for a visit to Yellowstone
Park and the Pacific Coast.  They will be away one month, then they will return to their handsomely furnished home on the corner
of Church and Park Streets.  [Note:  Today’s Second Street was called Park Street for many years.  At the north end of Park
Street was the entrance to Evansville’s first park.]

100 Years Ago (1910):  Mrs. Olivia Eager, daughter Gertrude and grandson Leonard, left Saturday for their trip to Europe.  They
went by way of New York City where they met a party of friends and on Tuesday they sailed on the steamer Lusitania.  They will
make an extended trip through the European countries.  Their many friends wish them a pleasant trip and a safe return.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Girl Scouts of the Methodist Church are occupying the Porter cottage at Lake Kegonsa for a few days
chaperoned by the Misses Esther Franklin and Eleanor Porter.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Nightly revival meetings at the Free Methodist Church here closed Sunday night when the Rev. L. S.
Hoover, radio evangelist, who has been in charge of the services for the past three weeks, returned to his home at Tionesta, Pa.  
Considerable interest was manifest in the meetings this year and fair sized crowds were in attendance.  [Note the Free Methodist
Church was in the building now used by the Grace Baptist Church in the first block of West Church Street.]

70 Years Ago (1940):  William G. Patterson, 306 South First Street, sustained a badly bruised and dislocated right knee and a
painful head bruise at 9:30 a.m. Sunday when he was dragged several feet by a young team of runaway horses on the late
William Hubbard farm, two miles north of the city, which he operates.  He was removed to the Madison General Hospital where his
knee was put in a cast.  The accident occurred when Mr. Patterson attempted to stop the team from running away with a wagon.  
He had gone to the farm to cultivate his potato crop.  The team was stopped by his son, Leon Patterson.  Mr. Patterson is being
cared for by his daughter, Mrs. Byron Dripps who was summoned from La Crosse.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Dr. R. G. Heimerl, Milwaukee, arrived here early this week to take possession of the Dr. O. G. Libby dental
office and practice which he recently acquired.  He will begin his work here about Aug. 1.   In the meantime Dr. Heimerl will refinish
and redecorate the office at 1 ½ West Main Street.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Some fifteen elm trees have been removed by city crews in the past several days, as the city moved to
eliminate trees with the very contagious Dutch elm disease.  Any residents who notice anything which looks out of the ordinary
about elm trees on their property are urgently requested to notify the City Hall immediately.  A number of calls have been
received by City Clerk Koralyn May from people who suspect their trees may be infected.  The reports are being checked by
Harold Tait and Ed Zamzow, and by the state Department of Agriculture.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The sale of the popular “Popcorn Stand”, which was operated at the corner of Madison and Main Streets
for many years, was revealed recently.  Mrs. Delbert Zwickey purchased the business from Amber Kleinsmith.  She plans to
operate the stand herself.  Mrs. Zwickey will keep the stand open afternoons and in the evenings and all day on the weekends.  
She hopes to merit the continued patronage of the popcorn customers.

30 Years Ago (1980):  The end of an era!  The Wyler School has been closed.  All contents of 3 buildings to be sold at auction.  
This school has been in existence as a semi-military academy, and prior to that, the Evansville Seminary since Civil War days.  
There will be antiques & collectibles, some in good condition and some will need work.  Wyler School Auction, Tuesday, July 1, 9:
30 a.m.  George Auction Service – Auctioneers.

20 Years Ago (1990): Harold “Butch” Beedle, a member of the J. C. McKenna Middle School faculty, was the recipient recently of
a 1990 Kohl Teacher Fellowship Award.  Beedle was presented a $1,000 award as was the Evansville Middle School.  Beedle was
chosen for his overall dedication to education in ecology, environmental studies and in teaching.  He is very active in the student
assistance program, the student council, and in recycling programs.

10 years ago (2000):    Janet Sperry is retiring as Financial Director of the Water & light Department.  Jane Oberdorf is Janet’s
replacement.  Janet indicates she will be through mid-September.  When asked what she is retiring to, Janet Sperry replied, “I’m
retiring to quilt, to garden and to grandma, my three grandkids.  As well as spend more time with my husband.”


In Review
First Week of July 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  On the Fourth, the day was ushered in by a national salute.  At the appointed hour, the procession was
formed in front of the Spencer House, under the direction of the Marshall, led by the Evansville Cornet Band, to the grove in the
rear of the residence of Dr. J. M. Evans.  It was a most delightful spot.  Speeches were short, pithy and of a highly entertaining
character.  After the closing exercises, parties resolved themselves into families and groups, strolled about the grove and enjoyed
a dinner.  Everyone came provided with enough for himself and friends.  The tub race was witnessed by the whole audience, who
lined the banks of the pond and crowded upon the dam to witness the sport.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  By 9 o’clock people and teams began to arrive from the country for the parade.  Marilla Andrews
portrayed the “Goddess of Liberty” surrounded by other young ladies representing the states.  A stand was erected in the grove
on Dr. Evans’ property for the speaker, officers of the committee, the band and choir.  L. T. Pullen was master of ceremonies.  A
patriotic speech was given by a young orator from Janesville, Ogden H. Feather.  A shooting contest was held near Campbell’s
slaughter house.  Fireworks were set off on a large platform wagon set in the midst of the corner of Main and Madison.  People
watched from balconies and staircases as John Swager and G. C. Lehman set off the fireworks.  The cost was $65.00.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Dr. Stair was called to two cases of sun stroke Saturday.  One was that of Hendrick Hanson, near
Cooksville and the other Smith Jameson, of Magnolia.  Neither case proved fatal but revived again after a few hours.

110 Years Ago (1900):  The annual school meeting occurred upon last Monday evening in the High School room.  The questions
of adding a kindergarten department to our school and of fitting up a gymnasium for the girls were discussed at length and after
the pros and cons of each had been duly considered the matters were put to a vote and the result is that these important factors
will be added the coming year.  The subject of free text books also received its share of attention but was voted down.  Those
who opposed these added features to the school did so on the ground of expense, as usual.  We believe with the majority of
persons present that our city’s money can bring us no returns equal to the quickened intellects and strengthened bodies of our
youth and nearly every home in Evansville will derive benefit from these advancements in our school system.

100 Years Ago (1910):  M. J. Fisher has just platted the Winston and Hulburt land lying south of the creamery and bounded on
the east side by C. &. N. W. right of way.  It is called Fisher’s 2nd addition.  The Canning Co. and City of Evansville have
purchased about one half of the land platted, but there is a fine place for a factory or two left just south of the D. E. Wood Butter
Co.’s plant.  

90 Years Ago (1920):   Mr. and Mrs. Bill Sumner announce the birth of a baby boy the 5th of June, whose name is Wm. Allison
Sumner.  Mrs. Sumner was Miss Thora Brunsell.

80 Years Ago (1930):  One of the headline attractions at the Lions club 4th of July celebration here will be concerts by the famous
Parker Pen Band of Janesville.  Walter Gollmar Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Gollmar, 115 South Madison Street, is one of the
cornet players.  The musicians are attired in attractive orange and black uniforms and are all members of the Janesville local
musicians’ union.  The Parker Pen Band will appear in the parade and will be heard in concert at noon in Leonard Park.  The
band will also furnish music for the dance to be held at 9 p.m. in the arts building at the fair grounds.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Ervin Jorgensen, 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Jorgensen, Almeron Street was killed, and Eddie Trebs, 26,
the driver and Robert Allen, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Allen, Mill Street, were seriously injured here at 3:30 a.m. Sunday
when the home built racing car in which they were riding struck a truck and burst into flames near the Winn gas station on North
Madison Street.   Trebs was at the wheel of the homemade racer, made from a Model A Ford.  The three youths were returning
from Lake Kegonsa and all were riding in the front seat.  The injured youths were taken to the hospital in Janesville, by Chief of
Police Lamb in the city’s squad car.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Approximately 80 girls from Chicago and other large cities are enrolled for the summer period at the Leota
School for Girls camp at 443 South First street which is owned and operated by Mrs. William Bone.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Richard Antes, English teacher and swimming coach in the Freeport schools is in charge of summer
activities at the local swimming pool, with Michael Sorkin student at Northwestern, assisting.  With the sun brightening things up
the past few days, much activity has center in and about the pool.  Life guards are:  Richard Antes, Mike Sorkin, Dean Allen, Scott
Sperry, Theo Rasmussen, Norman Hull, Jerry Propst and Mary Lynn Estes.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Sgt. David Persons and Miss Sandy Noel of Marquette, Mich., were July 4th weekend guests here of his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Don Persons.  Sgt. Persons is based at Sawyer AFB in Michigan.

30 Years Ago (1980):  If you pull wallpaper off of many homes in Evansville you would find the name Geo. C. Dell written on the
walls or that of Geo. H. Dell, his father, or both.  The apartment above Steve’s Barber Shop on 17 E. Main is being redecorated
by Roger Berg, and Geo. Dell is doing the papering.  When the paper was removed the following inscriptions were found:  
“Papered by Geo. H. Dell 1911.”  This was George Dell’s father who was in business before him.  On another wall in the same
room was:  Papered by Geo. H. Dell & Son, May 8, 1937.  By this time, his father was doing the pasting and George C. was doing
the hanging.  On two walls of two rooms it was written “Papered by George C. Dell, May 28, 1960.”  

20 Years Ago (1990): Clark and Dorothy (Fiene) Prudhon were married July 9, 1940 at the Little Brown Church in Nashua, Iowa.  
They moved to Evansville in July 1954.  July 15, the family is observing the fiftieth (50th) anniversary of Clark and Dorothy’s
marriage by holding a reception in their front yard at the north end of Clifton Street.  

10 years ago (2000):    Key figures from the City of Evansville, the Town of Union and the Evansville Community School District
met last Tuesday, June 27th, to discuss boundaries and time lines for annexation of town of Union school-owned property into the
City.  The school district architect would like the annexation to occur in August; however, determination of the actual building
location may not be completed much before that time, due to incomplete site and soil boring work, making it difficult to determine
exactly how much land should be annexed.  If the school building does drop too far south, the Town of Union would have
concerns that land owners would ask for annexation.  

In Review
Second Week of July 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The sabbath school and congregation connected with the Free Will Baptist Church propose to have a
ride and basket picnic on Thursday next at Grass Lake.  A cordial invitation is extended to all who wish to join in the occasion.  
Parties expecting to go must be at the church by 8 o’clock, morning.
130 Years Ago (1880):  Statistics of the town of Union.  Number of Inhabitants in town of Union, Rock County, State of Wisconsin,
enumerated by me in June, 1880:  Inhabitants in the town, 1012; Inhabitants in the Village of Evansville, 1067; Number of Farms,
221; Establishments, Productive Industry, 21; Deaths, 26; Insane, 2.  Jacob West, Assessor.

120 Years Ago (1890): Mr. Geo. Hall, Jr., informs us that his alligator escaped from its confinement last night and is now roaming
at large in our village, also that he would be a dangerous animal to meet, especially by children.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Work has begun on Mr. John Robinson’s new residence west of the city.  R. Hankinson has the contract
to build it. [Note:  The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in January 2010.  It is located at 18002 West
County Trunk Highway C.]  For more information go to this website:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/hp/register/viewSummary.
asp?refnum=09001221

100 Years Ago (1910):  Joshua Mulock Owen, an old and honored resident of Evansville died at his home in the Commercial
Hotel Tuesday morning of hemorrhage of the brain.  He was proprietor of the Commercial Hotel for 30 years, selling out his
interest only last fall.  Mr. Owen’s wife died 4 years ago and he lost an only child, a daughter 13 years ago.  The funeral services
will be held at the Commercial Hotel Thursday at 2 p.m.  Rev. T. W. North will officiate.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The factory on the county line known as the Jones cheese factory burned Tuesday evening.  The fire
started in the engine room, it is thought.  However, it is not just sure where the origin was.  The building was completely razed to
the ground.  There was a month and a half output of cheese in the building and of course this is all spoiled.  This creamery has
been run by the farmers and has made them a good outlet for their milk and now they are wondering where they will dispose of
their product.  John Golz who is president of the cooperative factory states that it will be some time before it will be rebuilt.

80 Years Ago (1930):  A new 33,000 volt transmission line now being constructed by the Wisconsin Power and Light Company
from Prairie du Sac through Stoughton to Monroe through Evansville and Monticello, will give the city of Evansville two new
sources of power and will better serve the customers of this locality.  The 33,000 volt substation, which is being completed here
will transform the 33,000 volt energy to 2,300 volts for city distribution.  Evansville is fortunate in having this new transmission line
routed through the city because the new sources of electric supply will insure dependable service and will take care of the
increased demands for electricity at this point.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Operations at the plant of the Columbus food corporation here were resumed Tuesday when a crew of 100
men and women returned to work packing the late pea crop of 275 acres.  Evansville farmers are expected to haul in large
numbers the latter part of this week and the fore part of next, when production will reach its peak and the crew will be increased to
about 125 workers.  Plant crews, according to Earl J. Gibbs, local manager, have been dusting the late crop in an effort to
eliminate the insects which usually infest the second sowing.  The viner stations are located on the farms of Roy Fellows, William
Trickle, Milbrandt Brothers, Warren Reese, Robert Bryan, Clark Osterheld, Grant Howard and Herman Miller.  Others are located
near the church in Center township and at the plant.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Palmer Haynes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Haynes, returned home Monday night.  He represented the
Evansville Boy Scouts at the National Jamboree at Valley Forge the past two weeks.  In discussing the trip, Palmer said:  “There
were 47,000 of us in all and in that group there were 18 foreign countries represented.  President Truman and Ike Eisenhower
were there and talked to us.”

50 Years Ago (1960):  The Dutch Elm ordinance, which gives the city the right to remove trees which have the disease, will take
effect upon its publication in the Review next week.  The city will remove the elms at no cost to the property owners.  The council
unanimously approved the appointment of Harold Tait as city forester, a position established by the new ordinance.  He is now the
superintendent of the city’s water and light department, and will get no compensation for the new duty.

40 Years Ago (1970):  At the recent quarterly meeting, the Board of Directors of the Baker Manufacturing Company named John
F. Townsend as a Vice President.  Townsend, 47, joined the company in September 1950 as a pattern setter.  He became
foreman of the foundry and core room in May 1951, in 1961 he was appointed foundry Superintendent.  He and his wife, Barbara,
have five daughters and reside at 223 West Main Street.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Tom Dreher recently presented the United Methodist Church with a beautiful wood carving, depicting “The
Parable of the Sower”.  Rev. I Dean Jordan incorporated the parable in his sermon when the presentation was unveiled in late
May.  Dreher worked on the wood carving during the winter.  The pine wood carving bears the inscriptions from the Bible.  In the
center is the Sower.  Shown in the corners are the modern day version of the material things of man, with man seated dejectedly
in the lower left.  In the upper left corner is the breaking of the cross with a snake representing Satan.  Clouds show hard times
and birds are also included.  In the lower right hand corner is the joy of man with his family, the results of a good sower.

20 Years Ago (1990): Rev. Daniel J. Wilson preached his first sermon at the Congregational United Church of Christ on Sunday,
July 8.  For the past three years he has served as Associate Pastor at St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Oakville, MO.  Rev.
Wilson will be married in June of 1991 to Sue Schmidt.  His special interests are sign language, recycling, letter writing, music,
bicycling and tennis.

10 years ago (2000):   Twenty-four members of the Class of 1940 were present at the 60-year reunion held June 23 at the
Evansville Country Club.  Also present was former sixth Grade Teacher Ada Ewins Turner, of Palmyra, Wisconsin and her son,
Peter Turner.  Thomas Kennedy was the chairman of the reunion committee.  Robert Brunsell provided a lively commentary as
the Emcee.  Reunion books were prepared by Ruth Morrison Gollmar.  


In Review
Third Week of July 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  A rider came into town on a horse all flecked with foam, on Thursday last, for the Doctor to see a child of
Mr. William Lee, of Magnolia, who had eaten a quantity of Paris Green.  The mother saw the child before it had time to swallow the
fatal dose and took it nearly or quite all from the child’s mouth, else the poison intended for the filthy potatoe bug would have
killed her darling child.  Keep your potatoe bug poison from the children.
130 Years Ago (1880):   The town has stone drawn upon the spot for rebuilding the bridge across the stream at the foot of Main
Street.  The bridge will be eight feet wider than the present one, extending northward that distance and connecting with the
sidewalk.  Street Commissioner Williams has charge of the job for the town.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Evans, Jr. have their household gladdened by the arrival of a girl baby, since last
Thursday night, July 17.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  Mr. Robert Graham succumbs to injuries received last Monday night.  He was thrown from a railroad car
one mile north of Clinton and was taken to the hospital in Janesville.  Mrs. Graham was sent for and went Tuesday afternoon in
company with her sister and Dr. Evans to visit the injured man.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  The installation of a sewer system in this city has become more than a possibility.  It is now but a question
of time when sewers will be laid in our streets.  The question the voters decided last Tuesday was “Shall the City of Evansville
issue bonds for the sum of $8,000 for sewage purposes?”  The matter was settled by a decisive vote of 174 for the issue of the
bonds to 104 against, leaving a clear majority of 70 in favor of the proposition.  It means a reaching out for greater things, an
invitation to manufacturers to consider this beautiful home-adorned city as a fitting place to establish their plants.  It is the
opening wedge toward a condition of growth which has in it unlimited opportunities and splendid achievements.

90 Years Ago (1920):   A collection of old-fashioned school books, toys, Civil War relics, valentines, souvenir pins and buttons,
surgical implements, and other articles of the period between 1856 and 1880, belonging to John M. Evans, pioneer of Evansville
has just been given to the State Historical Museum by his daughter-in-law, Mrs. John Evans, of Madison.  The children’s toys and
costumes will be incorporated in the museum’s children’s room.  Dr. Evans was surgeon for the 13th Wisconsin volunteers during
the Civil War.  The City of Evansville, Wis., was named for him.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  A candelabrum stolen some time Friday night from St. Paul’s Catholic church here was found Monday
afternoon by Chief of Police Fred Gillman north of the Crow and Ames ginseng beds on Garfield Avenue.  The thieves had
broken it open and removed the money.  The candelabrum was given to the church in memory of Michael McCarroll.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Lyle Wells, 468 South Madison Street, sustained a broken bone back of the little finger of his right hand
when a heavy drill dropped on his hand while he was boring cylinders at the plant of the Baker Manufacturing Company.  X-rays
were taken and medical treatment administered by a local physician.  Wells will be unable to resume his duties at the plant for
about a month.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  It has happened again!  Allen creek has been on a rampage since last Saturday night and late
Wednesday afternoon it reached its peak.  About six o’clock the entire lower section of Leota Park was covered with water.  The
water raised two feet in two hours Wednesday afternoon and the Evansville Feed and Fuel company’s building and the Miller
Hotel were threatened with a deluge.  Water covered the railroad tracks near the depot.  The Jamaicans employed at the canning
factory were forced to vacate their living quarters.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  The progress of the new school building is behind schedule.  The foundations have all been placed and
brick is being laid.  The boiler room is completed.  The plumbers and electricians have made installations.  The road approaching
the school on Third Street has been completed.  Sewer, water and electrical connections are being extended by the City Water
and Light Dept.  Supt. J. C. McKenna doubts now that the building can be completed in time for fall classes to begin.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The following youths of St. John’s Lutheran Church recently attended Lutherdale summer camp at
Elkhorn:  Tony Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rolland Allen; Judy Anne Kuelz, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Kuelz; Anne Thomas,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merlin Thomas; and Sandy Koch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Koch.

30 Years Ago (1980):  At the Evansville School Board meeting, July 14, Ms. Joyce Nelson reported that 78 kindergarten children
were screened, they have 74 who are registered but they felt there are a few who have not been screened.  The teachers
recommend that there be four sections next fall.  Business Manager Cufaude presented copies of a letter from the DPI to the
effect that state aids would be cut 4.4%.  This would amount to a $43,680 reduction in total state aids.  They will send a letter to
the state to object strongly to this cut which comes after all school districts have made their budgets.

20 Years Ago (1990): Lions Club members jumped in once again to offer their talents and time for a project in the park.  They
finished the small shelter at the south entrance to the city park.  Workers included Lee Winch, Steve Hagen, Si Chapin, Keith
Williams, Gerald Beckwith, Dave Ross and Greg Helgesen.  Keith Williams built the limestone steps to reach the deck of the
warming house in the upper park.  The limestone was donated by Don E. Larson from their quarry west of Magnolia and by E. F.
Reindahl from his quarry between Brooklyn and Oregon.  A railing was also added to the warming house room and the roof is now
in excellent shape for use, entertainment or programs.

10 years ago (2000):   Evansville’s All Star Blue Traveling baseball team were the champions at the VYBA Little League
Invitational Tournament at Orfordville on July 15, 2000.  Team members were Jacob Conrad, Mark Haakenson, Josh Schnell,
John Bolling, Owen Ringhand, Alex Manion, Garth Coats, Eric Zee, Kyle Schulz, Tyler Maybee, Chad Rasmussen, Eric Seeman.  
The coaches were:  Head Coach, John Reilly, Steve Maybee and John Rasmussen.


In Review
Fourth Week of July 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We understand that only about $40, is lacking the Baptist Society for the purchase of a thousand pound
bell.
130 Years Ago (1880):  Married:  At the residence of Mrs. Marshal, near Dayton, Green County, July 25th, by Rev. Chas. E.
Goldthorp, Mr. Frank M. Shurger to Miss Jennie Magee, both of this village.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Messrs. H. Potter and J. R. West are making a draft for the new front in the M. E. Church, which begins to
look a little like business.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  The old cannon which was sent to this city from Washington, by request of our citizens arrived Monday,
and several shells with it.  It looks as if it would be able to remind us of the presence of another national holiday.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Byron Campbell has in his possession an octopus lately taken from the Pacific Ocean and which he has
just received by express.  It is a good specimen and its long, sinuous arms well illustrate its power to capture and destroy
whatever object its frightful tentacles come in contact with.  Mr. Campbell will be glad to show his prize to visitors and those who
wish to see a curiosity now have a chance.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The attendance at the Chautauqua which started in this city Tuesday has been excellent showing that the
people of Evansville stand always ready to support anything educational or intellectual.  The programs so far have been
interesting.

80 Years Ago (1930):  M. D. Fish, 523 West Main Street, an employee of G. C. Peake and Company here, narrowly escaped
drowning in Lake Leota at 3 p.m. Saturday when he stepped from shallow water into a deep channel near the south spillway and
was unable to swim.  He was rescued by Jess Kimberly.

70 Years Ago (1940):  A new 125 by 46 foot one-story, red brick office building is being erected here at the plant of the Baker
Manufacturing Company.  Representing the last word in modern architecture and convenience, the structure is towering on
Enterprise Street adjacent to the firm’s gas engine building and across the street from the warehouse.  The firm of Law, Law, and
Potter, Madison, which designed Evansville’s new $225,000 high school building is in charge of the architectural work.  The Fritz
Construction Company, Madison has been engaged as the contractors.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. Will Sumner, Jr., have purchased the Mr. and Mrs. Fred Luchsinger home on the corner of
North First and Garfield Avenue and plan to move there about October 15.  Mr. Sumner is the new manager at the Antes Printing
Company and he and his wife and daughter, Margaret Ann are living in Madison at the present.  Mr. and Mrs. Luchsinger own a
lot just west of their present home and they will begin building a new modern, smaller home as soon as arrangements can be
made.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Evansville students who visited the University of Wisconsin campus to register included Robert J. Bullard,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bullard, route 1; Ann Baker, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Baker, 223 W. Main St.; and Terry A. Cole,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cole, 442 W. Main Street.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The honor of turning the first spade full of dirt to start the building of Evansville’s Nursing Home was given
to John Wyse, president of the Evansville Betterment Corp.  Others at the ground breaking ceremony were William Bewick, Emil
Vilhauer, representing the Small Business Administration of Madison; E. V. Lunning, representing the Colonial Manor Corp. of
Sioux City, Iowa; Rollie Devlin, Dr. S. S. Sorkin, president of the Board of Directors; Dr. Robert Heimerl, Michael Finnane, Mayor
Ida T. Conroy, Thomas Reese of Seattle Wash. Project manager for the Careage Co., contractors for the project and Leonard
Finn.  The Rev. Joshua Crowell, pastor of the Evansville Congregational-United Church of Christ, gave the invocation and
benediction.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  According to the census figures sent to the City of Evansville, the population has dropped 8.9 percent,
thus giving Evansville a population of 2,726.  Ten years ago, Evansville was listed as 2,992, just eight people short of the 3,000
mark.  Considering all the new homes which have been constructed in the last 10 years, new faces in the city, and the land which
the city has annexed, city officials are finding this figure hard to believe.  For this reason, Pam Wilson and the Ordinance
Committee are compiling a list of facts to prove to the Madison office of the Federal Census Bureau that Evansville is bigger than
they say, and that the new figure presented is incorrect.  The committee is researching building permits, the post office, and water
and light hook ups to come up with facts.

20 Years Ago (1990):  An open house was held at First Financial in Evansville on Friday, July 27th to honor Annette Losey, who
will be retiring after 11 years of service.  Her immediate plans are to enjoy a trip to Australia to meet a new grandson and visit her
daughters, Jackie and Margo and their families.

10 years ago (2000):  At the school board meeting on Monday night of last week, Vince Maloney was unanimously selected to
serve as the J. C. McKenna Middle School Principal next school year.  Maloney had planned to retire, since his wife was retiring at
this time.  However, time constraints would have made it difficult to hire someone to start in August.    

In Review
First Week of August 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The Baptist society have purchased a 1,300 pound steel, amalgam bell, from the celebrated foundry of
Blymer Peaton & Co., Chicago.  It was received Wednesday and immediately raised into position upon their church, Mr. Caleb
Snashall engineering the job in fine style and without accident of any kind.  The bell is of good tone; but hardly possesses that
clear, sonorous ring of the Meneely bell.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  The new stone building being built by Mr. McGee on Main Street, is going up rapidly and will be a fine
building when completed.  [Note the building was the Magee Opera House and the site is the vacant lot between the coffee shop
and the Shannon Law Office.  The opera house was razed in the 1960s.]

120 Years Ago (1890):  Messrs. West & Garfield have the contract for building the addition and front to the Methodist Church.  
They do all the carpenter and mason work, ready for the painter, for $1,480 and are to have the job completed in 90 days.  The
present front of the church will be wholly removed, the material going into the new addition.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Miss Helen Richardson who has been clerking in the Grange store bank, has resigned her position and
will attend the University the coming year.  Clara Chapel has secured a position as bookkeeper in the Grange store bank, she will
continue her library work also.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Richard Williams, who has just returned from abroad brought home a blackthorn stick which he presented
to his friend, Daniel F. Finnane.  This blackthorn stick was obtained in Queenstown and is a fine specimen.  Mr. Finnane desires
to express his keen appreciation for this unique present which he values highly, and which as the years roll on will become more
and more of a treasure when its firmness and strength are called into requisition to support its owner in his declining years.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The Evansville City Council received petitions from the Methodist, Congregational, Baptist, Free Methodist
and Evangelical Association asking that the council forbid the playing of Sunday base ball and placed on file.  Ayes four, noes
none.  

80 Years Ago (1930):  At the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Luchsinger, on the county line road, northwest of
this city at 11:00 a.m. July 31, Miss Ruby Luchsinger was united in marriage to Mr. Archie Templeton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Templeton, of the town of Union, the Rev. R. W. Marks, pastor of the Evangelical Church of Brodhead, performing the service.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  A recommendation that an airport be maintained in Evansville has been made by the State Planning
Board.  The official announcement was received here last week by Mayor A. M. Winn from Frederick S. MacMillan executive
secretary of the League of Wisconsin Municipalities, Madison.  Though no definite plans for the project have been completed, the
old Rock County Fairgrounds here has been suggested as an ideal location for a flying field.  The selection of that site, however,
would undoubtedly necessitate the purchse of additional acreage to permit the landing of large ships.  [Note:  the Rock County
Fairgrounds was located on the site of today’s Theodore Robinson Intermediate School.]

60 Years Ago (1950):  Neil W. Moldenhauer, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Moldenhauer and Kenneth R. Gallman, son of Mr. and
Mrs. R. H.. Gallman recently enlisted in the U. S. Air Force for a four year period.  The youths will take basic training at Lackland
Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas, and then be assigned to one of the many technical training schools for the Air Force for
further training.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Funeral services were held here Tuesday afternoon for Eugene S. Millard, who died Sunday at the home
of his daughter, Mrs. Wilmer Hockett, Evanston, Ill.  He was 81.  
With his wife, the former Marjorie Winn, he operated the Millard Home School here for thirty years until his retirement eight years
ago.  One of Evansville's most popular figures, he had been ill for the past several years.  Although he had lost a leg after an
illness some years ago, he had announced that having learned to walk as a child, he would learn again 70 years later, and was
soon again active in the Free Methodist Church and Lions Club activities here.  He was a trustee of the Evansville Seminary for
twenty years.  [Note:  the Millard School was located at 259 West Liberty and in the summer moved to the Millard farm on 5th
Street.]  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Pvt. Anthony Wyse, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John Wyse, is home on a three-week leave from the army
following his advanced individual training at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.  He will report Aug 15 at Oakland, Cal.  From there he will
leave for Viet Nam.  Tony is in motor transportation, driving light vehicles.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Continuing its efforts to diversify in the wake of the country’s lowered economy, Baker Manufacturing and
its employees are building an oil pump unit.  With many area businesses suffering from the recession, a team effort by the
company and its employees to safeguard the economy of the community has resulted in switched emphasis in marketing.  Twenty-
five of the pump units were hauled to Kansas this past weekend.  Research in different marketing areas will be ongoing at the
Baker Manufacturing Company.

20 Years Ago (1990):  More than 100 relatives gathered at the George Wollinger, Sr., farm on Rte. 2, Evansville on Sunday, July
29 for a family reunion.  Among the relatives attending were Mrs. Wollinger’s niece and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Petschi,
Glendale, NY and a granddaughter, Jackie and her son from Washington.  Despite a rainy day, all had an enjoyable time.

10 years ago (2000):  At the upcoming City Planning Committee meeting there will be a review and consideration of a site plan,
submitted by Magee Construction for their property located on Water Street.  The property is located in the Light Industrial District
and is currently a vacant lot.  The applicant is proposing to construct a 100 x 50 foot shop and storage area with a 25 x 60 foot
office, show room and employee area.


In Review
Second Week of August 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Evansville Seminary.  The Fall Term of this Institution will open August 30th, continuing 12 weeks.  Tuition
from $5.50 to $7.50.  Board $3. Rev. G. S. Bradley, Principal.
130 Years Ago (1880):    Mr. Jas. W. Osborn, general agent for the Baker Manufacturing Company, who is operating in Illinois,
spent Sunday with his family and friends in Evansville.  He reports the vaneless windmill and rotary power attachment a complete
success and is being well received everywhere it is introduced.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The M. E. Church society held their meetings in the Free Will Baptist Church yesterday and will continue
to do so during the building of the addition to theirs.  Possibly this will remind the F. W. Baptist Church of olden times in its
increase of attendance.

110 Years Ago (1900):  A horse which was being driven by Mrs. Jessie McCart last Sunday afternoon and ran away throwing the
occupants out and demolishing the vehicle.  The occupants escaped without injury.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Col. G. W. Hall returned Sunday from a week’s trip with his show through portions of Iowa and Minnesota.  
They now have eight 60-foot cars and manage to “Make a living,” as the Col. jocosely remarks.  The company are heading for
New Orleans and down into Old Mexico for the winter, and may later go as far as South America.  It’s good show weather in these
countries all winter.

90 Years Ago (1920):   Henry Gilbert of the firm John Gilbert & Son, of Oregon, was in the city demonstrating a Velie-Six car, the
agency of which has just been acquired.  The car is made by the John Deere Co. and Mr. Gilbert states that he hopes to prove
that it is one of the best cars on the market.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Henry Hamilton one of the few remaining members of the T. L. Sutphen G. A. R. , who has been visiting
friends here for the past week, returned Monday to Baraboo, where he is making his home with his son.  While here Mr. Hamilton
had the satisfaction of receiving his first $100 per month pension check, as a veteran of the Civil War, where he saw long hard
service.  Mr. Hamilton was notified some time ago of the increase in his pension.  Mr. Hamilton will be 90 years of age in August.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Miss Charlotte Brunsell, daughter of Mrs. Grace Brunsell, route 3 this city, has been entered by the
Evansville 4-H club as a candidate for Rock County’s dairy queen at the 4-H fair to be held in Janesville Aug 12 to 15.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Among the new homes being built in Evansville are those of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Weary and Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Luchsinger on Garfield Avenue; Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Franklin, Sherman Avenue, and Mr. and Mrs. Pliny Tolles on Third
Street.  Mr. and Mrs. Jim Davis have purchased a lot on Grove Street and Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Thompson have bought a lot on
Sherman Court, (The Circle.)  The home of Mr. and Mrs. Ted Schaller on the Court is nearing completion.  Mr. and Mrs. Franklin
have sold their home on South First Street to Mr. and Mrs. Howard Norby, who recently sold their basement house on Longfield
Street to Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Coyne.  Mr. and Mrs. Victor Wall will move into their new Grove Street home soon at which time
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Peckham will take possession of the Wall house on South Second Street, which they purchased last spring.  
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Morrison have purchased the Antes house on North Madison Street.   

50 Years Ago (1960):  The resignation of Buzz Schwartzlow, relief man on the Evansville police force, was received.  Stanley
Sperry, Sr., will succeed him.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Paul George, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dean George, showed his Reserved Grand Champion Hereford
steer at the Rock County Fair.  He sold his steer at the auction sale for 70 cents per pound.  The animal weighed 1,005 lbs.  Rod
Janes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel Janes had the grand champion registered senior bull at the fair.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Next to sidewalk bargains, the best thing about Crazy Day was the free corn-on-the-cob.  The Chamber of
Commerce bought the corn from Libby’s and Roger Katzenmeyer donated his corn cooker and his labor.  His daughter,  Rena
Paquan, helped cook.  The George Brothers donated their services to auction off over $400 worth of goods Friday night and a
pig donated by the Georges was won by Connie Fellows in a raffle that drew over 400 entrants.  Proceeds went to the Evansville
Chamber of Commerce to defray promotional costs for Crazy Day.

20 Years Ago (1990):  A lot of excitement will be noted in Evansville this week, as Weese’s Restaurant becomes transformed into
a location for filming of a movie.  Weese’s Restaurant, located on Union Street, on Hwy. 14, will be closed some of the time to
accommodate the film crews and allow for the filming.  J. J. Murphy, an Associate Professor in the Dept. of Communication Arts at
the University of Wisconsin, Madison is the producer/director of his latest movie, “Horicon Marsh.”  Murphy had been looking for
just the right diner location, within one hour of Madison.  Weese’s Diner will fill the bill, providing just the right setting.  Willard
Weese, owner, is excited about the forthcoming action.  

10 years ago (2000):  The storm, flat-line winds, “tornado-like”, that occurred this past Saturday afternoon, was widespread and
devastating not only to the county’s corn crop, but to the area’s treasured old trees.  The 80 to 90 mph winds zig-zagged across
the Magnolia area, southwest of Evansville.  The storm moved in about 3:30 p.m. and lasted only about 10 minutes.  But the
damage it did in nearby Magnolia in that short time is unbelievable.  Mangled buildings, flattened corn fields, huge trees uprooted
and blocking roads, some 40 telephone poles were down in this area.  Barns, silos, sheds, corn cribs, fences, poles, trees and
more trees were like little play things in the wind.  The power outages continued through Sunday.


In Review
Third Week of August 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We learn from the census taker that the population of Evansville is rising a little over one thousand.  Our
population has undoubtedly been placed too high; but we don’t care, we have a nice enterprising business town as can be scared
up in Wisconsin.  Our population are actual possessors of the soil they occupy and not carpetbaggers.

130 Years Ago (1880):    That long sought for building, and much scolded about affair—a city lock up—is at length under contract
and on a fair way of completion.  The Board got at loggerheads last year and nothing could be done.  The new Board, entered
into a contraction with Frank Springer for $400 to complete the building.  The building is to be practically of stone, eighteen feet
square, twelve feet high and roofed over with tin, and to stand upon the northwest corner of the town hall lot near the sheds of
the Methodist church.   [This was Evansville’s first jail and served until the City Hall was built in 1892. ]

120 Years Ago (1890):  Emmett Reilly’s little three-year-old boy, living about one mile west of this place, strayed from home this
afternoon and was found upon the railroad track near the depot by Agent Hollister who brought him to his Aunt Cora, a
compositor in this office, where he remained until returned to his home by his Uncle John.  His parents were searching the corn
fields and neighboring houses greatly concerned about their lost little one.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Hon. Burr w. Jones was down from Madison Wednesday morning to see his parents.  Mr. Jones has
recently declined the Democrat nomination for governor.

100 Years Ago (1910):  For sale:  Large painted canvasses, 18 x 20 feet.  Will sell at low rates to those who want them.  Suitable
for covering hay stacks, wagons, etc. being waterproof.  Address or call upon Col. G. W. Hall, Evansville, Wisconsin   

90 Years Ago (1920):   The people of Cooksville proved themselves to be neighbors and friends of the right sort, Tuesday of this
week, when they met and gave a shower of many needed things to John Pearson and his sister, whose home and all clothing and
furniture was burned last week.  The ladies of this community are also busy tacking comforters and are helping to equip Mr. and
Miss Pearson to start over again at housekeeping, which they are doing by repairing an old granary and making it fit to live in
while they are rebuilding.

80 Years Ago (1930):  L. F. Hubbard, of the town of Union, is a great booster of the merits of Wisconsin No. 38, smooth-awn
barley, which he has now raised for two years.  This season he threshed 2, 380 bushels from 56 acres, 12 acres of which made
60 bushels to the acre.  Mr. Peter Templeton who threshed this crop, states that the majority of the oat fields he has threshed in
the town of Union have made from 60 to 80 bushels per acre.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Evansville is being represented in the Second Army maneuvers at Camp McCoy by five local youths,
Walter Hofer, Robert Hubbard, Eddie Trebs, Kenneth Hatlevig and Robert Kubly who departed from Janesville at 8 a.m. Sunday
with the 32nd Tank company in command of Capt. Lester Schuler.  Robert Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Allen, who is also a
member of that unit was unable to accompany the guard due to injuries sustained last month in an automobile accident here.  
The six boys have attended regularly the frequent drills in Janesville in preparation for the encampment.  The maneuvers are
undoubtedly a prelude to the call of National Guard troops for one year of training, probably next month in Texas.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Dr. S. S. Sorkin will move his office equipment from the apartment over the Hamilton Hardware store into
the ground floor office space recently vacated by Drs. R. J. and R. S. Gray.  The ceiling in the rooms are being lowered and a
complete remodeling and redecorating job will be accomplished at an early date which will provide Dr. Sorkin with a modern and
up to date office with lobby, consulting and equipment rooms.  [The office was located at 3 East Main Street.]

50 Years Ago (1960):  Neil Moldenhauer, formerly of Evansville, the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Moldenhauer, has recently started
a new business in Madison on the East Beltline Hy. 51.  The store is known as Neil’s Factory Outlet Shoe Store.  He has more
than 5,000 pairs of woman’s shoes on display in a wide range of sizes, widths, and styles.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Dr. Samuel S. Sorkin, 59, long-time and prominent Evansville physician, died unexpectedly in Stoughton
shortly before midnight August 11, 1970, from a coronary attack.  Ironically, Dr. Sorkin had been instructing a class of nurses at
Stoughton Hospital Tuesday night on the use of new intensive care coronary equipment, recently installed at the hospital.  
Complaining of being tired he left the hospital to go home.  He was found shortly thereafter, slumped over the steering wheel, in
his car, by the nurses who heard the horn blowing in his car.  Dr. Sorkin told them he had suffered a coronary and they brought
him into the hospital and used the very same equipment he had been explaining shortly before.  Efforts to revive him failed.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  The City of Evansville, like countless other communities across the country, was rather shocked to learn
that its population had actually fallen.  The U. S. Bureau of the Census preliminary figures showed Evansville had 206 fewer
people than after the 1970 census, dropping from 2,932 to 2,726.  The City promptly called the Madison district census office to
protest.  The 1980 figure for Evansville rose to about 2,850 (as the bureau finished up its “enumerating”, or counting,), but the
city thought the count was still several hundred low.  The figure generally used by the City was one provided by the state
department of revenue, about 3,100 people.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Barbara Nehls of Evansville was in the Rock County 4-H Fair audience, and heard Tanya Tucker say,
“Thank you to all the ladies back there who did the home cooking.”  That home cooking she was referring to was prepared at the
Evansville Village Square of Evansville, who prepared the food for all the grandstand performers as well as those attending the
Alumni luncheon at the Fair.  Take a bow, Dagmar.

10 years ago (2000):  The Panama Rainforest two-week trip by 3 Evansville School District staff members, 1 parent and 10
Evansville High School students was highly successful due in large part to the excellent student participation, field trip leader,
Butch Beedle reported to the Evansville School Board.  The group spent one week in the Panama Canal Zone and then flew to
the islands of Costa Rica, learning things about the environment, culture, and themselves.  Student participants were: Jeremy
Rasmussen, Renae Sarow, Jon Emery, Natalie Huschka, Alana Coats, Aaron Burkhalter, Kelly Burnham, Melissa Drake, Emily
Saul, and Megan George. Faculty members were Krista Henning, Mary Koehl, and Butch Beedle.  Vicky Rasmussen, a parent,
also accompanied the group.

In Review
Fourth Week of August 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Not long since one of our townsmen was swindled to the amount of $500 or more only through his
ignorance of the constituent parts of milk.  Lately some of our good dairymen propose to swindle their own pockets, having the
notion that milk at a cent a pound is a cheap article of food for pigs.  .
130 Years Ago (1880):   Mr. Ezra Mann, on Madison street, met with a pretty severe accident Thursday.  He was trimming out
some brush when the handle of his axe caught against the block on which he was at work and sent the full blow into the ball in his
left thumb, laying open a wound clear to the bone, and cutting the third finger quite badly.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Dr. T. E. Lucas reports his business of veterinary surgeon much better than he expected since his return
to this place, and his many old friends are much pleased to know that he has opened an office for the practice of his profession in
Broderick’s livery, where he may be consulted or his whereabouts learned at all times.  The doctor’s success is too well known in
these parts to need recommend from us, but we will state that he is undoubtedly the best read and most successful practitioner in
veterinary in this vicinity.

110 Years Ago (1900):  A lot of relics of the Civil War attracts considerable attention in the front window of the Pioneer Drug
Store, the surgical instruments used by Dr. Evans in the war constituted a part of them the day of the reunion.

100 Years Ago (1910):  B. J. McAtee and wife who have just returned from a trip to the east by auto are enthusiastic over this
method of traveling as a means of promoting health.  The journey covered some 7,000 miles.  They left here the latter part of
May and went through portions of Canada on their way to New York.  From New York they went to Boston and from there to
Atlantic City, enjoying every minute of the time while on the way as the eastern roads are smooth as floors.  There was no mishap
of any serious nature.  Six tires were practically used up, but not before they had given full service.

90 Years Ago (1920):   The burns of Calvin Powers, of this city, resulting from the bursting of a flask of moulten metal at the
Baker Manufacturing Co. plant, some time ago, have proven worse than first suspected and it has been found necessary to aid
nature by grafting new skin on the burns in order to make them heal.  Twenty of his shop comrades volunteered to furnish the
new skin necessary to transplant on the burns.  A small piece of skin was taken from the arm of each one and transplanted on to
the burns.  The operation took place at the Dr. Smith hospital last Sunday morning, and was a success in every particular.

80 Years Ago (1930):  After making some splendid winnings at the recent 4-H fair at Janesville, the young stock breeders of this
locality went to the State Fair, winning recognition and prizes for their animals.  In the Brown Swiss yearling heifer class, Dean
George placed first, Lee George, third.  Showing in the open classes, Dean George took second and his brother, Lee, third on
yearling Brown Swiss heifers.  In the sheep exhibits for the county which also placed first at the state fair, sheep from the
Robinson, Templeton and George flocks were also selected as representative specimens.

70 Years Ago (1940):  In preparation for the stream riprapping, Evansville’s WPA crew of 20 workers is this week dredging and
straightening Allen’s creek for the riprapping operations, and tomorrow will start excavation for the control building which will
house the city’s new sewage disposal plant.  The work is being done under the foremanship of Jim Brady, Janesville, who has had
considerable experience in the construction field.  When the sewage disposal project is completed Evansville will have sewage
treatment facilities equal to those of any city of its size, according to the state board of health, whose engineers have approved
the tentative plans for the local plant.  The combination of separate sludge digestion and trickling filter features of the proposed
treatment works will give the city complete sewage treatment facilities without impairing the aquatic life along Allen’s Creek.

60 Years Ago (1950):  The Pleasant Prairie school will have 20 pupils and will be taught by Mrs. Floyd Roberts.  The Brown
district east of the city has about a dozen pupils and the teacher is Mrs. Frances Fenn.  Miss Charlotte Runnels will teach the
Forest Academy school which has an enrollment of 20.   Miss Elizabeth Baker has been the teacher in the Tullar district for the
past several years and will return there this fall.  There are 12 pupils.  Miss Jeanne Werle of Beloit has been engaged to teach
the 11 children in the Butts Corners district.  Miss Hazel Murphy will begin her 26th year of teaching in the Tupper district.  Her
group will number 18 and Miss Murphy states that her pupils won 17 prizes at the 4-H fair on school work.  Mrs. W. C.
Moldenhauer will again teach in the Wilder district which has 19 pupils.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Braden E. Wolff, 53, died unexpectedly at the home of Don May, where he was spending the evening with
friends.  He was born August 28, 1906 in Brooklyn, but had spent his entire life here.  His parents were the late Fritz and Jennie
Mason Wolff.  
He had served as superintendent of the streets and alleys, and of public property for the past 21 years.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  A Bemis-Fellows family reunion was held Sunday in the Magnolia Town Hall.  Guests were Mrs. Lillian
Cawest, Los Angeles, Calif,; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Edward and son, David, London, Eng.; Mr. and Mrs. H. N. Slater, Brown Deer; Mr.
and Mrs. Hans Schneider and family, Wheaten, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Durner, St. Paul, Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Durner,
Janesville; Roy Fellows, Mrs. Grant Howard, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Howard and family, Mr. and Mrs. George Howard and
grandchildren, Mrs. Earl Fellows, Mr. and Mrs. David Fellows and family, Mr. and Mrs. Dean George and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Fellows and daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Fellows, Evansville.

30 Years Ago (1980):  A decline in enrollment of about 22 students is anticipated in grades nine through 12 when students report
for their first day of classes at Evansville High School, August 25.  The high school enrollment is projected at 411 students for the
1980-81 school year, compared to 433 last year.  An enrollment of about 390 students is anticipated at the J. C. McKenna Middle
School.   In order to accommodate the many parent requests for morning placement, there will be two morning kindergarten
sections this year and one afternoon section.  

20 Years Ago (1990):  New staff at Levi Leonard Elementary are Mrs. Sandra Papendieck and Mr. Gary Feldt, grade 3; Mrs.
Cindy Beedle, second grade home room, mornings and Mrs. Jean Chapin for the afternoon.  Some physical education classes will
have Miss Caroline Creek as their new teacher.  All students will get to know Mrs. Joan Brooke, the IMC director.  

10 years ago (2000):  On August 16, 50 community members met at the Sheraton Conference Center in Madison to participate in
the Evansville Community Partnership planning conference, led by Bert Stitt and his associates.  “Building Our Future Together”
was the logo and seven main areas of concern were designated:  planning, finances, downtown, community relations, community
identity, the lake, and community services.  


In Review
Last Week of August 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Union village school board raised $30 to repair their school house, build new outhouses, and get it ready
for winter.  One speaker said that he got his education in a log house and the school house was “good enough without laying out
money for repairs.”
130 Years Ago (1880):  The Town of Porter is having a new bridge built to replace an old one over Badfish Creek, near Leedle’s
mill.  They intend to build a first class bridge this time.  William Leedle has the contract.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mrs. Vie Campbell gave a riddle party, Thursday afternoon at her home on South Madison street; the
guests of honor were Miss Morehouse, Mrs. Morehouse, Kansas City, Mo. and Mrs. Deveraux, Algona, Iowa.  The prize was
awarded to Miss Morehouse and the “booby” prize to Mrs. Eva Spencer.

110 Years Ago (1900):  The old cannon which was sent to this city from Washington, by request of our citizens, arrived Monday
and several shells with it.  It looks as if it would be able to remind us of the presence of another national holiday.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Harry H. Loomis is building a bungalow on First street above Garfield avenue.  The dwelling will contain
six rooms, is of frame construction and will be completed some time this fall.  This is the first bungalow ever built in Evansville and
illustrates a new departure in home construction which may set a popular example.

90 Years Ago (1920):  The band concert which was postponed last Friday evening on account of the bad weather will be held at
Leonard Park Friday evening.  Besides the concert there will be a short talk by Rev. McDermott and vocal solos by Miss Esther
Franklin.  All are cordially invited.    

80 Years Ago (1930):  Evansville’s 625 public school children will return to their lessons Monday morning after enjoying vacations
since the fore part of June.  The high school enrollment this year, according to Supt. J. P. Mann, will probably show an increase
over that of last year due to the fact that the senior class will number about 55 as against 46 of last year and the freshman class
will number about 80.  Parents who desire that their children buy second hand books for the coming year should purchase them
this week.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Evansville’s population, according to the 1940 census is 2,329, it was announced this morning by Mrs. Alex
Richardson, local enumerator.  This shows an increase of 60 over the census taken here in 1930.

60 Years Ago (1950):  An army of 639 students and 29 instructors will return to school for another nine months of intensive
training.  Of the 639 enrolled, 368 are in kindergarten and grade school, and 271 in high school.  The current enrollment is
expected to increase and by next week it is quite probably that several more farm boys will be enrolled.  Some who are employed
in the canning factory will enroll at a later date.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  The new teachers who have joined the Evansville School Faculty are Mrs. Lydia Cain, William Byrns,
William Amundson, Miles Armstrong, Mrs. Mabel Klusmeyer, Mrs. Jeanne Butchart, Mrs. June Leuthold, Mrs. G. M. Halvorsen,
Mrs. Rena Rubnitz, Mrs. Rosalie Voss, Mrs. Tom Lot, Mrs. Helen Bennett, and Howard Seeman.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Because of the extreme dry weather and the city’s possible water shortage, Mrs. Ida Conroy, Mayor;
Wayne Ballard, Water and Light Supt., and Lawrence Skoien, Fire Chief have banned the use of water for lawn sprinkling, until
further notice.  As in many other cities, a water shortage could occur and become serious and the Evansville City officers wish to
avoid such a disaster in Evansville.  It is hoped all citizens will cooperate.

30 Years Ago (1980):  A portrait of Dr. Isaac Porter has been donated to the Eager Free Public Library by Eleanor Porter
Stafford, who inherited the portrait of her great-grandfather in 1927 from her father, John Porter.  Dr. Porter died just two days
after coming to Wisconsin to join his family.  He is buried in the Cooksville Cemetery.  His brother, Dr. John Porter, had purchased
land that would become Waucoma, now known as Cooksville, in Porter Township, from Daniel Webster.  The artist of the portrait
is not known.  It is not signed, but it is of the style and period of Chester Harding.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Mr. and Mrs. Michael Lampa of Chicago have purchased the Neuenschwander home on S. First Street and
are planning on converting it into a bed and breakfast by this coming spring.  They have already had requests from people
wanting to stay overnight.  Mrs. Lampa plans to open when they have two bedrooms ready.  They are anxious to talk to people
who may remember how it looked when the Holmes lived there or when it was the Leota Girls’ School.

10 years ago (2000):  Joe Van Rooy, head of the summer recreation program in Leota Park reported activities were attended by
675 children, mainly of elementary and middle school age.  He commended Ray Nipple for his help and services to the program
and said he had a great assistant, Becca Sigmund.


In Review
First Week of September 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  As everything relating to the Seminary is a matter of public interest, all will be glad to learn that last
Saturday a sufficient amount of money was placed in the hands of Sheriff Johnson for the purpose of settling up Semans’
mortgage.  The amount was $1,332.77.  The Seminary is now free from any encumbrance.  There are, however, a few hundred
dollars of indebtedness to various individuals, most of whom hold orders to the amount due them.  G. S. Bradley, Collection
Agent, Evansville, Sept. 5, 1870.
130 Years Ago (1880):    A tobacco shed on the farm of Ed Savage, near Cooksville, fell down Friday night or Saturday morning.  
It was a new shed which Mr. Savage had just built and had about three acres of tobacco already in it.  Work was commenced at
once clearing away the ruin and putting up a new shed.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Brink has the stone work of Reuben Winston’s store nearly completed, and in a day or two more will
be ready to tackle the large pile of bricks.  [Note:  Reuben Winston’s store was at 17 East Main Street.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:  Wednesday evening, September 5th, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Stevens, Miss Edith
Freehauf of this city and Mr. Wm. Ahara of Beloit.  The marriage ceremony was performed at eight o’clock, by Rev. Webster
Millar, in the presence of the members of the household in which the bride has lived for years.  Nothing but highest praise can be
spoken of Mr. and Mrs. Ahara and their many friends extend well wishes.  They went at once to housekeeping in Mr. William
Hurlbut’s home on West Mill Street.

100 Years Ago (1910):  A most pleasant gathering of the Gillies families occurred last Friday in this city.  Invitations had been
sent to the various branches of the original Gillies family that came to this country from Scotland in 1846.  This family consisted of
the following four brothers and one sister:  James, David, Margaret, George and Andrew Gillies.  Fifty representatives responded
to these invitations and all greatly enjoyed a picnic dinner in the city park.  Many came from a distance, among whom were the
following:  James Hutton Gillies and family, including Mrs. H. C. Johnson of Chicago and Dr. and Mrs. Wade H. Brown of Madison,
Wis;  Mrs. N. T. Slawson and family of this city and Chester Gilley and wife of Stoughton, all of whom belong to the James Gillies,
Sr., branch.  Representing the David Gillies house were James Gillies and daughter, W. W. Gillies and family, Elizabeth A. of this
city and Margaret Gillies of Sycamore, Ill.  The family of Margaret Gillies Jones was represented by a goodly number, eighteen
coming from Janesville, W. J. Jones, wife and daughter, Andrew Barlass, wife and daughter, Mrs. Henry Lloyd and her family
including H. L. Jones and wife, W. E. Lloyd and wife, Gilbert Lloyd and wife.  Coming from the George Gillies branch were the
following:  Mrs. Douse and daughter of Spring Prairie, Mrs. McAllister of Tracy, Minn., and Robert Gillies of Brooklyn, Wis.  So
successful was the first attempt that it was proposed to make this gathering an annual affair.

90 Years Ago (1920):  The population of Evansville is given as 2209.  In 1910 it was 2061 which shows an increase of 138 in the
decade.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Miss Leone Lamke, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Lamke, 303 West Main Street, became the bride of
Peter A. Finstad, mathematics instructor and assistant coach at the local high school, at a ceremony performed at 5 p.m. Friday
by the Rev. Arthur R. Cates in the First Presbyterian Church, Belvidere, Ill.  Mr. and Mrs. Finstad are making their home in the
upper apartment of Miss Fay Sperry’s house at 24 South Madison Street.

70 Years Ago (1940):  A transaction has been completed here wherein Veron H. Laufenberg, Bridgeport, purchased the Meyers
Bros. Lumber Company’s yards, stock, and equipment at 212 East Main Street.  The new proprietor took possession Tuesday
when an inventory was taken of the entire stock.  The lumberman comes to Evansville with considerable experience in the field of
building materials.  He gained his first experience when he accepted employment in a saw mill in Melleville at the age of 23.  A
year later he established the present yard at Bridgeport which business he conducted for the past 18 years.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  L. L. Thompson is this month celebrating his silver anniversary as a Ford dealer in Evansville, for it was
just 25 years the first of September that Mr. Thompson came to Evansville from Madison and took over the business here which
he purchased from William Schultz.  The Ford garage was located on East Main Street in the building now occupied by the Everill
roller rink.  The present Ford garage on South Madison Street was erected by Mr. Thompson in 1936.  Mr. Thompson has kept
abreast with the times and has more than doubled his business capacity, his service ability and his equipment since coming to
Evansville.  He now employs six men whereas there were only three needed to take care of the business 25 years ago.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Much remains to be done on Evansville new one-story elementary school being built.  Though the bond
issue was for $315,000, the general contract was let for approximately $200,000.  The ten-class room structure is expected to be
ready in late October.  It will accommodate between 250 and 300 pupils.  Space will be rented in the Masonic Temple until the
building is finished.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Work has been moving right along on the Nursing Home site here in Evansville on Fifth Street.  Footings
have been dug and foundations are being poured.  Cement blocks are forming deep walls as much sand has been an obstacle
so far.  Residents may now see the design of the many wings etched in the ground.

30 Years Ago (1980):  An Explorer Scout troop is being organized in Evansville on Wed., Sept. 10 at the Congregational United
Church of Christ.  An Explorer Troop is open to all youth, both boys and girls, ages 14-21.   Bill Hartje will be the adult leader.

20 Years Ago (1990):  The Evansville community is invited to attend an Open House Sept. 12 at the Mercy Family Medical Center
to welcome Dr. Edward Wojciechowski, the new physician at the center.  The doctor and his wife and their four children have now
moved into a new house in Evansville in the Eager Estates.  Mrs. Wojciechowski is an X-ray technician.  

10 years ago (2000):  Parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts, brothers, sisters, neighbors and friends watched the annual summer
performance of the Library Summer Players.  This year’s productions included “King Bidgood’s in the Bathtub and He Won’t Get
Out” and “The Cry Baby Princess.”  Summer players included Ryan Weaver, Becky Francis, Grant Francis, Lydia Eager, Thomas
Hurley, Julia Hurley, Kelly Gavigan, Jordan Meredith, A. J. Simonini, Ashley Thompson, Logan Fahlgren, Kelsey Rosser, Jacob
Wollinger, Jeremy Weaver, Ainae Soetart, Andrew Soetart and Sarah Hammann.  This is the 17th year for the summer players, a
drama workshop group that meets once a week at the Eager Free Public Library during the summer reading program.


In Review
Second Week of September 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  While our attention is directed to the County Board we recommend our fellow townsman, James R. West,
as we find him well endorsed by other portions of the County and is a man whom his own town would delight to support for Clerk
of the County Board.  Mr. West early responded to our country’s call when true men were needed to fight our battles; he has
discharged the duties of Postmaster faithfully, and acceptably, and we now feel that we can trust him to keep our County records.  
To repel the siege of Atlanta, he bears the marks of the enemies bullets, and an endorsement for clerkship is but a just and
feeble tribute to his fidelity and his sufferings.  No other man in the county whom we know can we more faithfully endorse than
James R. West, and we would like to see him supported at the Convention.
130 Years Ago (1880):  Married.  Sept. 6th 1880, by Rev. E. Robinson, Arthur G. Franklin and Mary A. Wall, both of Union.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mrs. Jake Allen is having a severe run of typhoid fever, and the chances for her recovery are thought to
be very uncertain.  Mrs. Allen has been away for the past year and only recently returned to be taken down with a severe typhoid.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Miss Mabel Hall went to Milwaukee Sunday where she entertained the spectators at the State Fair with
exhibitions upon her horse, “King.”

100 Years Ago (1910):  School began last week in the Union district with Miss Hazel Keylock of Evansville, as teacher.  In the
White Star school, Miss Sylvia Dennis began the year’s work this week.  Mrs. Ella Dowse is the teacher in the Butts Corner
district.  Not so many pupils from this vicinity as formerly are attending the Evansville schools.  The Misses Ethelyne and Lucile
Johnston at the high school and Miss Harriet Ingraham at the Seminary are the only representatives of this community.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  The Seminary has almost an entirely new faculty this year.  The teachers are as follows:  Principal and
Preceptor, S. E. Cooper; Preceptress and History, Rose L. Cooper; Science, A. Lynn Niles; Mathematics, Hazel J. Niles; Latin and
French, Ruth Tait; Commercial, Vivian Gillingham; Elementary, Zella V. Cassady; Piano, Verla Donkle; and Voice, Mrs. Thorman.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Construction work was started this week on a new grocery store at 405 South Madison Street to be
operated by Art Cain who is now located in the W. J. Clark building on the corner of Madison and Main streets.  The building will
be 14 feet wide by 20 feet long and will be of frame structure.  Mr. Cain will move his grocery stock to his new location next week.  
Born on a farm in the town of Magnolia, Mr. Cain moved to Evansville in 1909 to accept a position in the Grange grocery and was
transferred to the hardware department of that store six years later.  He purchased his present store from W. J. Clark in 1921 and
has conducted the business since that time.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Mr. and Mrs. Chester Jorgensen, Miss Gladys Edwards and Ward Popanz spent Sunday at Vilas park in
Madison.  They also visited Mrs. Jens Norum and infant daughter in St. Mary’s hospital.

60 Years Ago (1950):  An army of 639 students and 29 instructors made their way to the city school for another nine months of
intensive training.  Of the 639 enrolled, 368 are in kindergarten and grade school, and 271 in high school.  Two sections of
second grade have been moved to the Masonic Temple, the ground floor parlors of which have been suitable for the school
rooms.  The grades are filled to overflowing.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Nuptial vows were exchanged in St. Paul’s Catholic Church Sept. 3, by Mary Anne Porter, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John W. Porter, Brooklyn, and Louis Francis Fahey, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Fahey, Irish Lane, Madison.  Rev.
James Kramer officiated.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Dr. Roger S. Gray and Clark Prudhon have been appointed to investigate procedure for obtaining another
doctor for Evansville.  Since the late Dr. S. S. Sorkin died unexpectedly about a month ago, there are only Drs. R. J. and R. S.
Gray to care for the medical needs of the city and community.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Ninety-five-year-old Blanche Devine proudly holds her ballots as she performs her voting duty on Tuesday
afternoon of this week.  She has always voted, she states, and considers it a privilege to do so.  And to be sure, Blanche Devine
has seen many elections and she knows how much even one vote can count.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Construction started this past week on the proposed water tower on the east side of Evansville.  Long
needed, the tower will address the needs of periods of heavy usage, new construction in the city requiring more water and
especially for fire protection for the city.  The cost of the new tower is $441,500, plus engineering fees.  The main contractor is
CBI NaCon, Inc., known to many as the former Chicago Bridge and Iron.  R. T. Fox Contractors did the water main and Helgesen
Excavating is putting in an access road.   

10 years ago (2000):  Gigantic colorful bouquets of balloons outside Romano’s announced the Grand Opening of the Union
Street restaurant.  But inside the ambiance was much more sophisticated, with a gray, white and black décor, and beautiful
statutes and artwork of a Roman emphasis sent over from Italy by the owner’s sister.  Most seats were taken for both opening
night on Friday, September 15th and the Grand Opening this Monday.

In Review
Third Week of September 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Blacksmithing.  “Patronize your old institutions.”  Thirty years of practical experience with “old sledge” has
given me ample experience in the blacksmith business which I want the public and myself to profit by.  The ring of my anvil is my
sign at the foot of Main St.   E. Bemis.  
130 Years Ago (1880):  On Friday morning last, a little son of George Thurman, of Cainville, fell down a flight of stairs, at his
father’s residence, and broke the large bone of his right arm, midway between the elbow and wrist.  He was brought to town where
Dr. Evans set the injured member.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. George Dibble has his syrup works in full operation and is turning out the finest of syrup, at the rate
of nearly 200 gallons per day.  He informs us that the cane of this season is yielding a very large amount of syrup, all of a third
more than last season’s growth, and of a much better quality.  Mr. Chas. Decker’s cane, grown upon the Fitch farm, yielding at
the rate of nearly 400 gallons per acre.  This syrup is undoubtedly the best and most pure for all kinds of cooking purposes and
very profitable to the growers, retailing quickly at 50 cents per gallon.  We see no reason why it is not a more profitable crop than
tobacco, with an average yield of 300 gallons per acre.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  Our H. S. football team expect to go to Whitewater today to contest with the team in that city.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Park & Scheible are moving into the second floor of the Grange store where they expect to be ready for
business about the middle of October.  They have leased the above premises and will have fine and commodious quarters where
they will carry on the business of furniture and undertaking.  They have outgrown their present place and in their new and larger
store in the Grange block will be enabled to carry a more complete line of goods.  John H. Scheible has received word that his
examination papers have been passed upon by the Eckles School of Embalming at Fond du Lac and that the record thereof
places him second in a class of seventy-three.  This is a matter of pride to his friends and certainly commends most highly his
efficiency as a student.

90 Years Ago (1920):  On Saturday, September 18, in Rockford, Raymond Estes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Estes of this city
and Miss Carolyn Schumacher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schumacher of Janesville, were united in marriage by Rev.
Chester Smith, pastor of Court Street Methodist church.  Mr. Estes was a volunteer in the late war, a member of Company M,
serving in France and in Germany in the army of occupation.  The young people left Monday morning by auto for Necedah, on a
short visit after which they will be at home at 342 S. Madison St., this city.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The Rev. G. C. Saunderson, pastor of the Methodist church here for the past five years, was appointed to
the Methodist church at Hartford, Wis., at the annual Methodist conference held there last week.  He will be succeeded by the
Rev. G. K. McGinnis, of the Trinity Methodist church, Milwaukee, who will preach his first sermon here next Sunday.

70 Years Ago (1940):  The Evansville Tourist Club opened the city’s club and social calendar last night with a dinner party given
at the home of Mrs. J. Spencer Pullen at 419 South First Street.  The arrangements committee for the club’s activities this year is
composed of Mrs. Pullen, Mrs. Gertrude Eager, and Miss Lula Van Patten.  A group of some 20 members attended the opening
dinner and meeting at which programs for the year were distributed.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. Steve Qualle, Steuben, have purchased the McCaslin house on Liberty Street.  Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Madding are now residing in the west apartment.  Mr. and Mrs. Qualle are parents of Mrs. Russell Losey.  [Note:  The
Qualle house was at 231 West Liberty Street.]

50 Years Ago (1960):  Evansville’s 1960 football squad included Dick Erpenbach, John Reese, Kim Gill, Ken Holz, Dean
Spersrud, John Petterson, Ev Propst, Stan Bratzke, Ron Forstrom, Tom O’Brien, Dick Franklin, Mike Brown, Mike Hanson, Larry
Elmer, Don Ayen, Jack Elliott, Rod Roberts, Bud Kleinsmith, Randy Decker, Don Thornton, Jim Ganoung, Scott Sperry, Tom Cain,
Bob Crull, Dave Romstad, Bob Schuh, John Hopkins, John Spanton, Ralph Crull, Phil Lamont, Joe Bradley, Brad Beal, George
Prudhon, Jim Pea, Jerry Fahrney, Jack Hamilton and Rod Courtier.  Don Bratzke is the manager and the coach is Frank Prchal.  
.   

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Franklin, lifelong residents of Evansville-Cooksville area will be honored on Sunday,
Sept. 27, complimentary to their 40th wedding anniversary.  The couple was married Sept. 30, 1930, and they have lived on the
Franklin farm near Cooksville until recently when they moved into the remodeled Franklin schoolhouse near the farm.  Mrs.
Franklin was formerly Miss Crystal Westby.  The couple has four daughters and five sons, George, Brooklyn; David, Gordon and
Richard, Evansville; Paul, Enon, Ohio; Mrs. David Fellows (Catharine), Evansville; Mrs. Leonard Meehan, (Mildred) Rte. 4,
Janesville; Mrs. Douglas McLeish, (Eleanor) Helmstead, Germany, who is visiting here at this time and Rebecca, at home.  There
are also 23 grandchildren.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Brian Anderson was chosen Honor Scout on the last night of the Pine Tree Troop Leader Training
Conference held at Indian Trails in Janesville.  One scout is chosen from the entire troop for this honor, based on exceptional
Scout spirit, exemplifying the Scout oath and law.  Brian is the second Honor Scout from Evansville’s troop 514.  Peter Steinhoff
was selected last year during the first Pine Tree Troop Leader Development Conference.

20 Years Ago (1990):  For their annual outing eight members of the White Star Homemakers enjoyed lunch and a style show at
the Idle Hour Mansion in Monroe.  Attending were Ethel Hermanson, Stella Krumwiede, Anne Mae Heinsohn, Jeannette Fellows,
Charlotte Collins, Lucile Bollerud, Dorothy Prudhon, and Ruby Bernstein.  There are still some charter members in this group and
this year was their 36th anniversary of the local White Star Club.  

10 years ago (2000):  The Union Co-op property at the corner of Church and Maple Street was auctioned on September 20.  
Maynard Rauk speaking for himself and the Co-op board expressed appreciation for those attending but that the $85,000 bid on
the property was not enough.  Last week’s Co-op Auction brought out many interested in seeing who would buy the Union Co-op
feed mill but went home a bit let down.  Chuck Cushing of Baker Manufacturing threw their hat in the ring.  As for the other two
bidders, one was a stranger to all and would not reveal his source, the other was not even in attendance.  The building will still be
around for the next auction.


In Review
Fourth Week of September 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The following premiums awarded by the judges at the Southern Wisconsin Fair for 1870:  in floral, class
29, Mrs. D. L. Mills, Evansville, 1st premium on collection of phlox drummondii, double zinnias, cut flowers named; one hundred
and forty-five varieties.

130 Years Ago (1880):  We notice in the last issue of patents reported, that our townsman, A. S. Baker of the Baker
Manufacturing Co., of this place, has had two new patents issued to him, one being for a pump and the other for a mechanical
movement.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Fred Colony took his departure for the Rush Medical College, of Chicago, this morning where he
goes to complete his course as a physician.  He is fortunate enough to securing the night practice of a leading physician in the
great city.  Fred is one of Evansville’s finest young men, whom we all wish the best of success.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Married:   September 23, 1900 at 4:30 p.m. at the home of Mr. Frank E. Greatsinger, Miss Madge W. Hart
of Porter and Mr. Edgar Whipple of Magnolia.  Soon after the ceremony which was read by Rev. Mr. Miner, the couple left for
Belleville.  They will make their home in west Magnolia where the groom is engaged in farming.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Fred Woodstock, who lives about one mile west of Magnolia lost a little girl 20 months of age, last
Thursday by drowning.  There is a big stock tank in the yard used for watering the cattle and horses and in this tank the body was
found floating after the child was missed.  How the little thing got into the water has not been learned, but baby curiosity may have
lent added strength to its tiny legs to help in climbing up, when loss of balance would have easily sent it headlong into the water.

90 Years Ago (1920):  Cooksville:  An auto load of people from Madison were callers at the House Next Door last Friday.  Mr.
Warner recently acquired a diary, kept in 1776.  It was written in ink and is well preserved and legible.  He also has one of the first
dictionaries printed.  Nearly every day he adds something to his collection of antiques.

80 Years Ago (1930):  F. J. Anderson, representative of the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, Madison is in the city this week
interviewing local property owners to ascertain whether or not they are interested in gas service.  Providing four hundred or more
citizens show their desire for gas, the company will build a power plant and distributing system here.  The gas that would be
furnished Evansville is what is known as Butane gas.

70 Years Ago (1940):  With a crowd of nearly 200 members, former members, and friends in attendance, the Pleasant Prairie
Community club, one of Evansville’s oldest rural organizations, is today celebrating its twentieth anniversary at a one o’clock
luncheon and diversified program in the First Baptist Church dining hall.  The afternoon’s program with Mrs. Lloyd Miles,
president, presiding, will open with an address of welcome by Mrs. Potter Porter to which a response will be given by Mrs. Claude
Willoughby.  Following the assembly singing of “Our Club,” the entertaining will continue with the presentation of the club’s history
by Mrs. Henry Porter and a ceremony conducted by Mrs. Wallace Everill in which Mrs. Henry Porter, founder of the club; Mrs.
Robert Higday, first president; Mrs. J. C. Robinson, oldest charter member; and Mrs. Miles, president, will be honored.  Mrs. Henry
Porter has completed an interesting history of the organization.

60 Years Ago (1950):  The members of St. John’s Lutheran Ladies Aid Society are completing plans this week for the annual
church chicken supper to be served next Wednesday in the parish house on South First Street.  The prices have been set at
$1.25 for adults and 75 cents for children.  Mrs. Carroll Bly and Mrs. Harlan Hermanson will be co-chairmen of the kitchen; Mrs.
Stanley Jensen will have charge of the dining room, and Mrs. E. H. Koeneman is in charge of tickets and publicity.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Leon Patterson unloaded the last load of milk he hauled into the Bowman
Plant at Brooklyn.  He finished up after hauling milk for 41 years.  Patterson hauled into Evansville for six years, then for 35 years
took milk to the Brooklyn plant.  His route and equipment will be handled in the future by Ray Bund.  Patterson recalls several
times that he brought in 20,000 pounds a day.  This might not seem to be too much with bulk trucks, but with 86 pounds of milk to
a can, 20,000 pounds is a lot to handle.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The season ticket campaign for the Evansville Community Theatre will get underway Oct. 1, 2, & 3.  It is
being chairmaned by Mrs. Harry Romano, who will have as her workers, members of the Europe ’71 group who are already
starting to save money for the next summer’s trip.  The fall production “Never Too Late” has been in rehearsal.  Members of the
cast are:  Sharon Miller, Al Hipke, Joy Olson, Larry Olson, Myra Reynolds, Mark Bruce, Glen Gissing, and Tom Reynolds.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Mrs. Betty Steinhoff, proudly pinned her son, Rudy, with the rank of Eagle, at the Sunday meeting of the
Boy Scouts.  Only 2% of the Scouts in the nation achieve the Eagle rank.  The event was held in the United Church of Christ.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Dr. and Mrs. Roger Gray were on hand Monday afternoon at the Evansville Dean Clinic to greet their
friends and Dr. Gray’s patients, many of them long-time patients he has cared for over the years.  Dr. Gray is retiring as of this
week, after 42 years of service in the medical field.  He has given a lot of caring to the people of this community, having started
here in practice with his father, the late Dr. Rodney Gray.  

10 years ago (2000):  The City council unanimously selected the new city clerk/treasurer at a special meeting on September 20,
2000.  Sandra Hart, of Fulton, replaces Bob Poffenberger , who resigned in May.  She will receive an annual salary of $38,000.  
She officially starts her position October 10.  She also serves on the Rock Co. Board of Supervisors and represents the City of
Edgerton and Ward III of Fulton Township.  Mayor Steve DiSalvo, council members, City Administrator, Jennifer Petruzzello
welcomed her as she signed her contract.


In Review
First Week of October 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  The cheese factory of C. H. Wilder shipped yesterday, in a car sent to Evansville for that purpose, ten
tons of cheese sold to Mr. Finley of Madison, to be sent direct to Glasgow, Scotland.  We learn that Mr. Wilder has orders for five
hundred more cheeses than he can make during the present year.  If the farmers of this county would cease raising grain to sell
and turn their attention to raising stock, and the dairy, they would find that in a few years their finances would be in a much better
condition than now.  In the first place these products do not require as much labor and they pay better.  And secondly, each year,
that the farmer continues them, his farm instead of growing poorer, is better able to reproduce what he takes from it.

130 Years Ago (1880):  One of the teachers of the public school, Wayland Axtell, was before Justice Mills on Saturday last on
complaint of the parent of one of the pupils for maltreating the boy.  The case was tried before a jury who brought in a verdict of
not guilty and the teacher was discharged.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. and Mrs. Thomas George, residing on the county line four miles west of this place, were made glad
on Tuesday, Sept. 30th, 1890, by the addition of a ten pound boy to their family.  All are getting along nicely under the care of Dr.
T. F. Stair.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Died: September 28, in Chicago, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Lauren Bagley.  Mrs. Bagley took the
baby to Chicago a week previous to its death for the purpose of having an operation performed upon its throat. The child
contracted a cold during their stay in the city, which caused its death.  The remains were brought to this city Saturday noon and
the funeral was held from the house Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. Mr. Short officiating. The bereaved parents have the
sympathy of their many friends.

100 Years Ago (1910):  The census of 1910 gives the population of Evansville at 2,060 and by wards, as follows:  1st ward 600,
2nd ward 675, 3rd ward 785.

90 Years Ago (1920):  Mrs. B. W. Hubbard celebrated her seventy-fifth birthday Sunday in a very happy manner at the home of
her daughter, Mrs. Delbert Smith at Brooklyn.  During the afternoon several old friends and distant relatives called and at supper
time the family enjoyed a picnic feast.  Mrs. Hubbard is the mother of eight children, seven of whom with their families were
present namely: Ernest Hubbard, wife and son and two married daughters of Goodell, Ia., Ralph of Fort Atkinson, Osmond and
wife of this city, Clayton and two sons of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Smith and sons of Brooklyn, Lloyd and Robert and families
of this city.  At a late hour all departed wishing their mother many more happy birthdays.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Saturday, Oct. 4, will mark the opening of the new Allen Funeral Home located at 103 West Main Street,
according to an announcement made this morning by Malcolm V. Allen.  The new mortuary, which was formerly the J. B. Baldwin
residence has been remodeled, redecorated and completely refurnished giving Evansville the same modern funeral service that
is given in the larger cities.  The equipment which is of the most modern type, includes an Arlington Studebaker funeral coach,
and an eight cylinder Buick pallbearer coach and complete cemetery devices.  The first floor of the home will be used for
reception rooms and chapel space is sufficiently large to accommodate 150 persons.  A family room affording complete privacy, a
slumber room, and a most modern operating room are other distinguishing features of the new mortuary.  The large and spacious
casket show room in which is displayed a complete line of caskets and various sundries, is illuminated by new electrical
equipment.  The second floor, where Mr. Allen will reside has been remodeled into a living apartment and office.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  John Gardner Babcock, the last surviving member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic, will
quietly observe his ninety-sixth birthday next Monday at his farm home four miles south of the city in Magnolia.  The veteran was
born in Johnstown, Oct. 14, 1844 and enlisted in the United States Army at Janesville July 31, 1861, serving in Company D of the
Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry.  He was mustered out of service Nov. 19, 1864 at Nashville, Tenn.  Mr. Babcock was married Jan.
7, 1874 to Miss Mary Hannah Thurman.  Four children of Mr. and Mrs. Babcock were born in the present home and also two
grandchildren.  Mr. and Mrs. Babcock have three sons, Richard Babcock, an officer on the Janesville police force; Benjamin
Babcock, at home; and Charles Babcock, Los Angeles, Calif.  Their only daughter, Mrs. Grace Greatsinger, died several years
ago.

60 Years Ago (1950): David Fellows and the Misses Bethana Gundlach and Catharine Franklin will present a one-act comedy
“Boss of Strategy” at the Evansville Community Theater meeting at 8 p.m. Tuesday in the City Hall.  Those interested in selling
tickets for the first major production of the year, “Daisy Mayme” are requested to meet Monday at the home of Mrs. W. H. Keyes.

50 Years Ago (1960):  The DX Sundray oil Co., is building a new filling station on the late Dr. C. M. Smith property on the corner
of Madison and Church Streets.  The station will be 27 ½ feet in depth and 41 ¼ feet in length.  The structure will be of concrete
masonry with the front facing Madison St.  The huge storage tanks which have been on the lot for the past year have been put in
place.  New sidewalks have been built and a cement approach to the station is being completed.  If the construction goes
according to plans, it should be completed by Nov. 1.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. Thomas U’Ren and family, who have resided here on Garfield Ave., the past two years, will
move to their new home in Monticello, Ill. the latter part of this month.  The former has been transferred to that area from the
Varco-Pruden plant here.  They have sold their home here to Mr. and Mrs. Ronald DeKelver.  [Note:  the house was 36 Garfield.]

30 Years Ago (1980):  Grange Store is going out of business and all fixtures and furnishings will also be sold.  The Grange store’
s closing follows the closing of the Grange Super Valu by two weeks.  After 25 years of running the department store, Barbara
Adamany and Bill Brunsell will be closing out the remaining departments which include the clothing shoe and gift sections.  

20 Years Ago (1990):  Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Franklin (nee Crystal Westby) of Rte. 1, Evansville celebrated their 60th wedding
anniversary on Sept. 30, 1990.  Their children hosted a family banquet in their honor at the Carlton Hotel in Edgerton where they
stayed on their wedding night exactly 60 years previous.  This was also Crystal’s 80th birthday.  Their children are Catharine
Fellows (David), Mildred Meehan (Leonard), George (Sharon), David (Doris), Gordon (Della), Richard (Carol), Paul (Karen),
Eleanor McLeish (Douglas) and Rebecca Hughes (Dennis).  Their family also includes 38 grandchildren (four of whom are
deceased) and 23 great grandchildren.

10 years ago (2000):  “Deck the Cards” is the theme for the events of this year’s Evansville High School Homecoming.  The EHS
Homecoming Court is Erin Frain, Tara Krake, Joanna Forde, Melissa Drake, Angela Beggs, Shawna Warren, Serena Johnson,
Jessica Rasmussen, Joe Jakes, Chet Heacox, Dan McGoey, Brandon Hurtley, Ben Bowditch, Aaron Gransee, Dustin LaRue and
Shad Wanless.


In Review
Second Week of October 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Mrs. Gunn has her building opposite our office up and the carpenters are putting on the roof.  [Note:  
Sarah A. Gunn was a milliner and her building was at 16 West Main.]

130 Years Ago (1880):  At the close of the morning services in the Methodist Church, the retiring pastor, Rev. C. E. Goldthorp,
made the following summary report of his three years’ service here:  found 138 members in full connection, current members in
full, 194, on probation 27.  Have preached 430 sermons; attended 26 funerals; 135 class meetings; 155 prayer meetings; made
525 pastoral visits; visited 90 sick and dying and solemnized 20 marriages and attended 27 baptisms.  The church is in a very
healthy condition; no broils; no disaffected ones; no debts; no dilapidated condition of church or parsonage.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Supervisor J. L. Bear, of the special committee appointed by the County Board of Supervisors to examine
into the matter of draining the marsh in the towns of Janesville, Center, Magnolia, Union and Porter has visited nearly all the
property owners whose land are to be benefited by the so-called “Marsh Creek Drain.”   The majority of them, will oppose it, at
least until it is definitely ascertained how much the improvement will cost.  The land owners stood about eleven to five against it.  
Some were opposed to the improvements on the ground that it was impracticable on account of quick sand.  Others claim that the
land would not be worth the expense of reclaiming.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Leon Patterson left the first of the week for Chicago where he will take a course in dentistry at the
Chicago Dental College.

100 Years Ago (1910):  The Fred C. Wood twins have been named after their respective grandfathers, William Henry Wood and
Frank Elton Chase.  They were born Oct. 5, 1910.

90 Years Ago (1920):  O. W. Evans this week sold his home on Water Street to Abram Losey of Dayton, Wisconsin, who will
occupy it as soon as he can move.  Mr. Evans has purchased a home in Beloit and moved to that city this week.

80 Years Ago (1930):  A shipment of 582 head of feeding sheep arrived here this morning from Chicago for W. G. Miles, Fred
Johnson and L. F. Hubbard.  They will be fattened here and later shipped to the Chicago markets.  The shipment also included
22 head of cattle.

70 Years Ago (1940):  The Cooksville Lutheran church will sponsor a Lutefisk supper in the church parlors Thursday evening,
Oct. 17.  The general chairman is Mrs. Laura Erickson, dining room chairman, Mrs. Oscar Kjernes and kitchen chairman, Mrs.
Franz Holm.  Meat will be served to those not desiring the fish.

60 Years Ago (1950):  The unbeaten Blues of Evansville held to first place in the Rock Valley league by rolling over Coach Ralph
Black’s Jefferson Eagles here Friday night, 20-0.  It was Evansville’s third straight loop win.  A smashing ground attack in a 63-
yard drive opened the scoring when Bert Schenck took the ball over from the six-inch line.  Randy Feldt converted.  Dan Finnane
scored in the fourth quarter.  Feldt went off tackle for four yards for the final tally after a drive from Evansville’s 40-yard line.  
Eugene Grenawalt, left tackle, played the entire game for Evansville and his work was outstanding.

50 Years Ago (1960):  The 6th grade Girl Scout troop #182 spent Friday night and Sat. at the Girl Scout “Forty Acres” camp
onHighway “K”.  They worked on their camp craft badge.  The girls that attended were:  Jean Berg, Beatrice Corning, Susan
Hazlett, Gail Polzin, Ruth Ann Rowin, Paulette Bauch, Charmaine Brewer, Alice Erpenbach, Elan Kazda, Karbet Schoenenberger,
Rosemary Bower, Linda Woodstock.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The Evansville Republican Club has come to life to help elect the GOP candidates in the coming election.  
The aggressive group has opened a headquarters on Main Street and is working hard at rallying together.  Mrs. Renee Gill is
serving as Evansville chairman.  Dedicated workers include Carolyn Blanchard Allen, Elizabeth Brunsell, Charlotte Thompson,
Elizabeth Babcock and Dorothy Helgesen.

30 Years Ago (1980):  The Evansville nursing home has got a new sign and a new name.  The name was changed from
Continental Manor to Evansville Manor for two reasons according to Administrator Cliff Woolever.  One is because there are three
other Continental Manors in the state which are part of a chain of nursing homes.  Secondly, the name reflects that the Evansville
facility was built by the community as a community project.  The design of the sign was selected from several ideas by Richard
Krake, high school art instructor.  The sign was built by Ron (Bud) Peterson, Jim Brzezinski and Jeff Shannon.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Theodore and Mary Pestor will be noting their 50th wedding anniversary at a banquet in their honor on
Saturday Oct. 27, 1990 at noon.  Mary E. Copeland and Mr. Pestor were married on Oct. 26, 1940 in Iowa.  They moved to
Evansville from Elgin, IL in 1960 to purchase their own farm and they have been farming ever since.  The Pestors have 10
children:  Carol Smith of Middleton, WI; Ruth Heller of Oregon, WI; Ted Pestor of DeForest, WI; Dave Pestor of Evansville; Valerie
Eaton of Evansville, WI; Steven Pestor of Live Oak, FL; Tom Pestor of Evansville, WI; Sue Billings of Manitoba, Canada; Mary
Enrique, Kauai, Hawaii; and Ann Pestor of Evansville.  Twenty six grandchildren and one great grandchild round out the family.

10 years ago (2000):  To get local farmers’ grain to market more efficiently at a better price, Union Cooperative Association of
Evansville was granted a conditional use permit to build a grain train loading facility with 800,000 bushel storage on rail and to
operate a retail fertilizer facility on rail.  The rail would be built on the east side of County M, south of Highway 14 and would
connect with the mainline railroad between County M and Weary Road.


In Review
Third Week of October 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Mr. E. S. Sutphen and wife and Mr. J. R. McCannon and sister started Wednesday night last, for Yuba
City, California.

130 Years Ago (1880):  A council of ministers assembled at the Free Will Baptist Church Wednesday, to pass upon the
qualifications of Rev. F. M. Washburn to become a member of that society and pastor of that church; all of which proving
satisfactory, he was admitted into fellowship and duly installed pastor.  Mr. Washburn was formerly a member of the United
Brethren order, and principal of their school at Elroy, but has never entered the ministry until now.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  A book, Personal War Sketches Grand Army of the Republic, was presented to T. L. Sutphen Post No.
41, by Daniel Johnson, Harvey Prentice, Nelson Winston, Della C. Bennett, and Lloyd T. Pullen.  The memorial record was given
to the G.A.R. in a special ceremony at their hall.  

110 Years Ago (1900):  Chief of Police Cal Broughton, while going over the ground where he captured three highwaymen a short
time ago, found tied up in a blue handkerchief, half a stick of dynamite, twenty feet of water-proof fuse and twenty-three caps.  
Office Broughton had reason to believe that the robbers had something of the kind with them, but dropped them when they found
they would be captured.  After days of search he found the destructive parcel.

100 Years Ago (1910):  The Grange store has in course of construction a new horse shed in the rear of their big store which will
accommodate some 30 teams in addition to fully as many more outside the shed.  The new shed is 265 feet in length with cement
footing for horses and solid foot thick cement wall eight feet high, to which are attached hitching rods to which to tie.  It will be
covered over thus affording protection from snow and rain and will be a convenience the patrons of the store will greatly
appreciate.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  Dr. J. P. Guilfoyle of Stephen, Minnesota has located here for practice in Evansville and has offices in the
rooms back of the Pioneer Drug Store, formerly occupied by Dr. Evans.  He is a graduate of the Northwestern Medical College at
Evanston, Ill. and comes here well recommended.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Thieves broke into the Eager Free Public Library and a filling station on Union street sometime Thursday
night and escaped with $2 in cash from the library and six one-gallon cans of lubricating oil from the gas station.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Miss Mabel Heise, daughter of Herman Heise, Janesville became the bride of Lindle Apfel, son of Mrs.
Albert Apfel, Evansville, in Dubuque, Ia., Wednesday, Oct. 2.  Mr. and Mrs. Apfel will make their home in Evansville where the
bridegroom has a position with the Baker Manufacturing Company.

60 Years Ago (1950):  A ceremony held in the Congregational church at 2 p.m. on Oct. 14 united in marriage Miss Patricia Jean
Hensel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred F. Hensel, Evansville, and Kenneth Fred Kuelz, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Keulz, route 2,
Evansville.  Shirley Hensel was her sister’s maid of honor.  Another sister, Miss Georgia Hensel and Miss Kathleen Miller were
bridesmaids.  The junior bridesmaid, was Miss Louise Kuelz, sister of the bridegroom.  The flower girl was Pamela Erstad, cousin
of the bride.  William Martin served as best man and the ushers were LaVerne Seeman, Gordon Nipple and Carroll Hartl.  The
couple will be at home after Nov. 1 at 402 ½ S. First Street.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Evansville Council members left the City Hall Tuesday night after the regular October meeting feeling
somewhat harassed and put upon.  Four major projects, requiring considerable capital outlay have been tossed into their laps
with some urgency and this council, which has been trying to hold the cost line, as best it could, was not happy.  Projects which
need attention are:  renovation of the city sewage disposal plant; repair of Main Street bridge over Allen’s Creek; a sewer on
Union Street and a storm sewer system and curb and gutter in the southwest part of the city to take care of draining problems in
the area of the new school.   A public hearing will be held on October 25 at City Hall.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The Pleasant Prairie community club noted its 50th anniversary when they met at the Methodist Church
last week.  Six charter members of the club were present, Mrs. Hazel Miles, Wittenberg, Wis.; Mrs. Grace Brunsell, Evansville; Mrs.
Emma George, Evansville; Mrs. Mabel Robinson, Route 1, Evansville; Mrs. Barbara Allen, Evansville and Mrs. Margorie Porter,
Evansville.

30 Years Ago (1980):  The Baker Mfg. Co. is hoping to strike it rich in the oil field, with oil well pump units, that is and with the
present oil crisis the new products future looks promising.
Continuing its 107 years tradition of successfully diversifying its product lines when faced with economic recessions and
modernization trends, the company has added the production of oil well pump units to its product line to bolster the slump in sales
of its water well products caused by the economic crunch.  Baker president Frank X. Sandner, Jr. ramroded the engineering of
the oil pumper to get it in production in four to six months.  The company has been shipping 200 to 400 a month and the company
hit a new record of over $1 million in sales last month.  The success of the company has been its ability to diversify its product line
when the need arose over the years.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Evansville’s Homecoming Court were Steve Van Bohren, Jeff Fredendall, Chris Tomlin, Dan Runaas, Marty
Loftus, Mark Schwartz, Doug Lawrence, Scott Haakenson, Melissa Wadsworth, Maxine Haumschild, Tara Bradley, Rae El-
Batanoun, Megan O’Connell, Tommy Olsen, Angie Rowley, Sheyenne Brown, Danelle Schmid, and Jenny Neuenschwander.

10 years ago (2000):  Some 17 or so ladies have been busy all year in the basement of St. John’s Lutheran Church making quilts
from every type of material imaginable.  In addition to the 231 quilts, St. John’s members prepared and shipped 33 school kits; 8
sewing kits; 33 baby layettes; 50 lbs. of soap and 18 boxes of clothing.  The items were shipped for Lutheran World Relief.


In Review
Fourth Week of October 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Mr. Dibble has brought into our office a couple stalks of peanuts, which he raised from the seed this year,
the nuts are full grown and most of them ripe.  They were planted quite late hence his success was not so satisfactory, but the
fact is demonstrated that peanuts can be raised in this latitude and with a favorable season and the right kind of soil, the
business could be made quite remunerative.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Farmers coming into town from the East, across the railroad track, wonder why train men could not go a
little further and not stop the rear car exactly on the crossing.  It is the same sometimes when they are in a great hurry to home at
night.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  George Hall, Jr. and his son, Frankie, take their departure for Chicago today to join Cole and Middleton’s
circuses with their trained pig, goose and snakes.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Col. G. W. Hall’s great elephant attracted quite a crowd upon our streets Saturday, as it passed through
from Madison where it had been on exhibition during the carnival.  Col. Hall and son-in-law Frank McCart will give their famous
exhibition of wild animals, jugglery, Punch and Judy, wire walking, etc. for the benefit of the woman’s Relief Corps, Thursday
evening, Friday evening and all day Saturday.  Miss Jessie Hall handles a snake 21 feet long.  Everybody visiting Madison during
the carnival said that Col. Hall had the best, cleanest and most respectable show there.  His lions are beautiful and he has a
professional tamer of wild beasts who goes into their dens and handles them as freely as he would kittens.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Ray Hankinson and wife left on the noon train Monday of this week for Portland, Oregon.  Mr. Hankinson
is one of our Evansville boys and we feel proud of him.  A graduate of the state university engineering department, he was
appointed as superintendent of light houses on the Atlantic Coast, steadily advancing from year to year.  Mr. Hankinson is now
receiving the snug little sum of $2,400 annually, and will superintend the light house district bordering on Washington and
Alaska.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  The advocates of Woman’s Suffrage have ever contended that when woman voted she would stand for the
pure and good in politics, and condemn and cast out rottenness, graft and dirty political methods, regardless of what party used
them.  The women of Wisconsin at the elections a week from next Tuesday have the opportunity to either prove all that their
friends have claimed for their intelligence in the use of the ballot, or else the opponents of the rights of female suffrage will be
given an opportunity to say “We told you so.”

80 Years Ago (1930):  Div. No. 1 of the Congregational Church will exhibit quilts and hooked rugs in the church parlors during the
afternoon and evening of Wednesday Oct. 29th.  The quilts and rugs will be classified and judged according to their classes.  The
ladies will be glad to have anyone bring quilts and rugs for exhibition.  Light refreshments will be served and there will be an
admission of 25 cents.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Kathleen Miller, 9, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Miller residing east of Evansville fell from the swing at
the White Star School and broke her left arm near the wrist.  Kathleen was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, Madison, where X-ray
pictures were taken and the arm put in a cast.  Her father and grandmother, Mrs. J. D. Dalton, Evansville accompanied her.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Miss Shirley Ann Hensel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hensel, Evansville became the bride of Carroll
Paul Hartl, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hartl, Evansville, in a ceremony performed at 9 a.m. Saturday in St. Paul’s Catholic Church
here.  The Rev. F. J. Mehigan read the rites.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  The thirty-fifth anniversary party of the Lion’s Club will be held at the Masonic Temple, Monday, Nov. 7 at 7
p.m.  Robert J. Antes is the only charter member who has retained his membership consecutively since the club was formed.  He
will be cited that evening for his long membership as well as other members who have belonged 25, 20, 15, and 10 years.  The
club was formed 35 years ago in the old “Central House.”

40 Years Ago (1970):  Although several meetings of the Teamsters Local 579 of Janesville and the Evansville Board of Education
have been held, no wage settlement has been reached.  The Board refused to accept the latest offer made by the union.  The
offer calls for an increase to $2.80 an hour for all male custodians with the exception of the head custodian for whom they are
requesting $660 per month.  The present wage scale ranges from $2.08 to $2.48 per hours for all male custodians.  The union is
asking for $2.25 an hour for the female custodian, who is presently receiving $1.54 per hour.

30 Years Ago (1980):  “Just for Him” a men’s clothing store located in Brodhead will open a store in Evansville.  They will occupy
the space vacated by the Willis Drug Store on W. Main Street.  The store, owned by Babe Proefrock and Dan Newcomer of
Brodhead, carries quality clothing and they are planning other merchandising services for the Evansville area.  Watch for their
opening soon.  [Note:  the store was located at 7 West Main Street.]

20 Years Ago (1990):  Matthew Zwicky received the Eagle Scout Award, the highest award in scouting on Sunday, Oct. 21, 1990
in a Court of Awards Ceremony at the Congregational United Church of Christ.  He is the son of Stephen and Ardis Zwicky.  
Matthew is a member of Troop 514 which is sponsored by the Evansville Lion’s Club.  The award was presented by Rod Courtier,
past Scoutmaster.  Matthew’s Eagle Project consisted of planning, organizing and overseeing the painting of the street sign poles
in the Historic District of Evansville.

10 years ago (2000):  Even though their Rock Valley standing slipped to a 6-1 conference and a 7-2 overall, Evansville’s Blue
Devils advance to the playoffs with their win last Thursday evening over Beloit Turner.  In an exciting 21-8 game, Player
Wyttenbach finished with 169 yards on 30 carries.  The first round of the playoffs will be Tuesday at Lancaster, a team that has
won the Southwest Wisconsin Large-School Division Championship with their 6-0 record.  Lancaster also is the top-ranked team
in Division 4.


In Review
First Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  New Organization!  First National Bank of Evansville.  L. T. Pullen, President, I. M. Bennett, Cashier.  
Whereas by satisfactory evidence presented to the undersigned, it has been made to appear that The First National Bank of
Evansville, in the Village of Evansville, in the County of Rock and State of Wisconsin, has been duly organized under and
according to the requirements of the Act of Congress entitled “An Act to provide a National Currency, secured by a pledge of
United States bonds, and to provide for the circulation and redemption thereof” and has complied with the provisions of said Act
required to be complied with before commencing the business of banking under said act.  Now Therefore I, John Jay Knox, acting
Comptroller of the Currency, do hereby certify that “The First National Bank of Evansville”, in the County of Rock and State of
Wisconsin is authorized to commence the business of banking under the said act.  31st day of October, 1870.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  The Baker Manufacturing Co. have purchased the Delpheny lot, which joins the Company’s property on
the West and will at some future time erect buildings on it made necessary by the increase of business.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Simons is excavating beneath his building next to the bank and will fit up a barbershop to be occupied
by Johnny Johnson.  [Note:  Attorney H. N. Simons purchased the building at 4 East Main in 1889.  The G. A. R. Hall (Grand Army
of the Republic an organization of Civil War Veterans) was on the second floor.  A cigar store was on the main floor and the
barbershop in the basement.  This commercial building was razed in the late 1960s when U B & T expanded to the east.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  One of the largest and most enthusiastic political gatherings of the campaign occurred last Monday
afternoon when Hon. Robert M. LaFollette of Madison spoke from the rear of a palace car to five hundred persons.  His train was
over an hour late but the crowd all stayed to hear our to-be Governor.  The Evansville band discoursed some inspiring music and
Mr. LaFollette in turn laid down some facts of an interesting nature to all Republicans.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Friday evening, Nov. 11, in Magee’s opera house, the volunteer firemen of this city give a dance.  This
will be the 26th annual ball of the Evansville Fire Department.  Kneff and Hatch fine orchestra from Janesville will furnish the music
and before the dance will give a concert.   Let us remember our valiant firemen and their legitimate needs, and help them, at
least, to the extent of one or more tickets to their annual ball.  They are always ready to respond on the instant to your call.  Will
you not do something for them?  

90 Years Ago (1920): Last Monday, Custodian Fred wilder turned the water off the mains leading to Leonard park and officially
declared it closed for the season.  The park was appreciated this year by many of the tourists from other states as a camping and
a resting place on their way to the northern lakes.  The young people of this city appreciated the athletic field of the park and
hardly a day passed that some were not practicing either on the track or on the tennis court for some amateur events.   

80 Years Ago (1930):  J. C. Robinson and son have entered 13 head of Herefords and W. G. Miles 34 head of sheep in the
American Royal Livestock show to be held in Kansas City, Mo., Nov. 15 to 22.  Both breeders exhibited at the American Royal last
year adding several ribbons to their collections of previous years.  Phil and Harold Robinson and Walter and Arthur Templeton,
members of the Evansville 4-H club, and Dean and Lee George, of the Magnolia club, are entering lambs in the Junior Livestock
Show to be held in Madison next week and are expecting to enter their animals again at the International Livestock exposition to
be held at the Chicago stock yards Nov. 29 to Dec. 6.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  A vivid description of the well-known Chaunte Training field near Rantoul, Ill, where seven Evansville
youths have enlisted was given to the Review editor by Edwin Devine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Devine.  Upon leaving Evansville
early in September, Devine, in company with John Wall, Lloyd Schudda, and Jack Kennedy went direct to the air corps field
where, following registrations, they submitted to thorough physical and mental examinations and were later assigned to three
weeks of recruiting.  Other Evansville youths who had previously enlisted there were Ted Greenway, now stationed at March
Field, near Riverside, Calif; and Donavan Wall, who with Jack Kennedy is in the air mechanics division.  John Wall, Lloyd
Schudda, and Jacob Larsen, Jr., who enlisted later, are in the sheet metal training department.  Devine is in the clerical.  The
government has enlarged Chaunte Field from an encampment of about 4,000 men a year ago to a present enrollment of nearly
10,000.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. George Smith, residents of Evansville for 50 years, will observe their 53rd wedding
anniversary at their home here at 243 W. Main Street next Wednesday.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith were married Nov. 8, 1897 in
Oregon.  Mrs. Smith was formerly Cora Persons of Attica.  After coming to Evansville the Smiths resided on a farm south of the
city a few years and 30 years ago Mr. Smith and sons purchased a meat market here which he and his son Ray, operate now.  A
son, Harold, died 13 years ago.  Besides the son, Ray, the couple has a granddaughter, Mrs. Harold Beyers, Evansville and a
great granddaughter, Carol June Byers.

50 Years Ago (1960):  The Thirty-Second degree was awarded Thursday evening to a class of 47 candidates at the Masonic
Temple, Madison.  Rowland Straka was the only candidate from here.  Other members who attended were Ed Jorgensen, John
McElroy, Dick Deily, and Jay Brink.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. George Wollinger, Sr., will observe their 40th wedding anniversary.  The former Anna
Linsmeier and George Wollinger, Sr. were wed on Nov. 4, 1930 at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church in Redwood Falls, Minn.  The
couple has farmed for many years in the Evansville area.  The couple has seven children, Mrs. John (Delores) Hein of Hales
Corners, Wis.; Mrs. Harold (Agnes) Neal, Footville, Wis.; George Wollinger, Jr., Evansville; Mrs. Robert (Helen Bennett,
Evansville; Mrs. William Bauman, Monroe; Cathy Wollinger, student at Whitewater college; and Donald Wollinger at home.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Clarence Franklin, who is 97 years young, recalls the first vote he cast 76 years ago.  The year was 1904,
when he was 21, and he voted for Teddy Roosevelt.  Today he still believes in voting, as evidence by his casting his ballot on
Tuesday in the presidential election.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Since Dave Wartenweiler began as building inspector for Evansville in 1986, the growth has been steadily
on the upswing.  The average new home is selling for a comparatively low $70,000 price tag in Evansville.  His figures reflect an
average of 10 new homes a year.  Home improvements, renovations and additions have been a big item too, bringing his yearly
inspections to an average of 117.  

10 years ago (2000):  R. G. Huston Company, Inc., Cottage Grove, was granted the site grading contract with the Evansville
Community School District for the new high school site.  Huston’s bid, at a stunningly low $393,895, was 17.25% lower than the
number two bidder, Rock Road Companies, out of Janesville.  


In Review
Second Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We want a good, faithful, industrious boy to learn the type-setting business.  None but one of steady
habits need apply.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Johnson & Stevens Bros. shipped seven car loads of stock; they have bought in the last few days 12,000
lbs. of wool, 10,000 lbs. delivered yesterday.  The lot contained one clip of 3,000 lbs.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Caleb Snashall is home to vote.  He is having more tenement buildings built upon his lots near
Chicago.  Mr. A. C. Gray of this place who has lots adjoining Mr. Snashall’s in the big city, will soon commence having similar
buildings erected upon them.

110 Years Ago (1900):  The whole number of votes cast were 534 of which McKinley received 411, Bryan 79 and Wooley 44.  
The telephone and telegraph news came promptly and accurately.  Almeron Eager’s joy at the 4,000 Republican majority in Rock
county and the 110,000 Republican majority in Wisconsin caused him to rush to the telephone and order two barrels of apples
sent up to the place of rejoicing.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  The bowling alley in the opera house block was opened Monday night.  Everything is in good shape for
players of this healthful and muscle-producing game and the old patrons have begun to get ready for the sport, while the new
ones are coming on apace.

90 Years Ago (1920):  The basket social at Pleasant Prairie schoolhouse Friday night was a success in every way.  A fine
program was given by the pupils.  The quilt was drawn by Ray Rasmussen, and nearly $90 was taken in from the sale of baskets
and tickets for quilts.

80 Years Ago (1930):  “A Sure Cure for Falsehood”, a one act comedy, was presented by Carroll Bly, Robert Dalton, and Walter
Spratler, members of the Evansville Young Men’s Club, at a joint meeting of county Y.M.C.A. board members from Green and
Rock counties held Monday night in Orfordville.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Football letters were presented to 21 prominent high school athletes by Coach George O’Neil.  Seniors
receiving letters were Kenneth Haakenson, Gordon Jorgensen, Bob Bovre, Bob Gibbs, Marvin Devlin, Bruce Townsend, Alwyn
Utzig, Ken Wall and Judd Pearsall.  Underclassmen honored were Haaken Haakenson, Donald Hartin, Arthur Sands, Carl Weaver,
Donald Graham, John Spanton, Bob Hurd, Russell Nihart, Stanley Haakenson, Rolland Bowen and Clifford Sarow.  The manager’
s letter went to Wally Erdman.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Evansville residents have been listening to chimes twice each day and many are still wondering where the
sweet music is coming from.  The chimes, installed in the Congregational Church on trial, are being played twice daily by Mrs. C.
A. Richmond.  Donations to a chimes fund are being received by the Rev. Mr. Richmond, which will eventually insure the
installation of a set.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Evansville voters turned out in near record number Tuesday, casting 1,400 valid ballots in the
gubernatorial race and 1,395 valid ballots in the presidential contest.  In the president contest, the Nixon-Lodge ticket beat out
Kennedy-Johnson by a 905 to 487 margin.  In the contest for governor Phillip Kuehn got 850 to 550 for Gov. Gaylord Nelson.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Harry E. Roderick, an official of the National Office of Civil Defense in the Pentagon, is the author of an
article on civil defense operational communications problems which was published in the October 1970 issue of Signal magazine.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Dr. Sheila Sorkin, daughter of Mrs. Hannah Sorkin and the late Dr. Samuel S. Sorkin, who served
Evansville for so many years, will be opening her practice in Evansville shortly.  Her office will be located on E. Main Street, in the
building owned by Dr. Ed. Krueger at 115 East Main.  Dr. Sorkin will be a General Practitioner.

20 Years Ago (1990):  The Evansville water tower, located on the east side of town is now completed and this week will be filled
with water for testing.  The tower will be painted in the spring, as the weather is now too cold.  The tower was finished in very good
time.

10 years ago (2000):  The employees at the Evansville Post Office celebrated the retirement of Art Harnack.  Harnack celebrated
his last day on Fri. November 3.  Art has 33 years of postal work and 2 years of armed services time to complete a 35 year career.


In Review
Third Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Young “Thad” has chosen an artists’ profession.  He went to Chicago last week where he will take lessons
of experienced teachers, with intentions to make perspective drawing and painting a profession.  All who have seen Theodore’s
pencil sketches the past year or two, are convinced that he has selected a congenial profession.  There is not a young man of
better habits, purer morals, or one whom Evansville would delight to honor in any calling, more than Theodore Robinson.  If
health supports him a brilliant future lies within his reach.

130 Years Ago (1880):  A young man, lately working in Richardson’s barber shop had his ears frozen last Sunday, while walking
to Albany and back.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The Methodist Episcopal society held services in the basement of their church Sunday for the first time in
several weeks, on account of the addition being built.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Rev. Charles Merrill of Beloit, agent for the Children’s Home Society of Wisconsin, spent last Saturday
and Sunday in this city.  Mr. Merrill comes to Evansville at least once a year for the purpose of finding good homes in which to
place homeless children, also to care for any children in this city that are without homes.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  George Wolfe is putting in a drain ditch on his property in the rear of Meyers Bros. lumber yard.  Skilled
ditchers with their automatic ditching plow are doing the work with the intelligent assistance of sixteen horses, eight of whom rest
while their mates laboriously turn the capstan which coils the long reach of wire rope which pulls the gigantic plow nearer and ever
nearer to the end of its deep and wide furrow.  The outlet will join issues with Allen’s creek, so that Mr. Wolfe is advantageously
located to successfully drain his marsh and bring it to a high state of productivity.  [Note:   George Wolfe owned land north of the
present Nelson Young Lumber Yard.  Wolfe’s land extended east from Allen’s Creek and the railroad tracks.  His property
included part of the marsh on the east side of today’s Union Street.]

90 Years Ago (1920):  Cassius C. Howard was born September 20, 1845, in Herkemerr County, New York, moving to Wisconsin
with his parents in 1848, settling in Magnolia, where he lived until 1900, at that time moving to Madison, having been appointed
Messenger Clerk in the office of the State Board of Control; being appointed to that office by Governor La Follette.  His health
failing him, in 1908, he resigned and moved to Evansville, where he has since made his home.  Mr. Howard served in the Civil
War as a member of the Forty-second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.  He was married to Mary A. Robson of Magnolia, January 1,
1867, she departing this life, September 4, 1916. To this union was born two children, Jesse M. Gillman of this city and Howard of
Madison.  Mr. Howard answered the last roll call last Tuesday at the home of his daughter Mrs. Fred Gillman. The interment will
be in Maple Hill Cemetery this afternoon, the Rev. William Bird, of Magnolia, officiating.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The new basement of the Cooksville Lutheran Church will be dedicated at a special ceremony to be held in
the church at 1:30 p.m. Sunday.  The basement has been remodeled into church parlors at a cost of about $3,700 and has been
equipped with a water system, electric lights, chairs, dishes, kitchen utensils, silverware, furnace and curtains.  The dedication will
be given by Right Reverend Joseph M. Green, bishop of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Kenneth Morrison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Morrison, 430 Almeron Street, has recently been graduated
from the apprentice training course conducted by the Baker Manufacturing Company.  He is the first of the apprentices
indentured in the Baker company to complete the course.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  About 400 Evansville Citizens and guests attended the football banquet here in the school gym
Wednesday night at which Rolland Barnum, formerly of Evansville and former athletic star at the U. W. was the principal speaker.  
The banquet was given in honor of the 1950 team which finished as co-champions for the season in the Rock Valley League.  Co-
Captains were Randy Feldt and David Fellows.  Coach David Demichei and assistant coach Bill Hinze were presented with
jackets.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  A violent windstorm did many thousands of dollars worth of damage west and north of Evansville about 5:
45 Tuesday afternoon.  The storm did extensive damage throughout southern Wisconsin, with many motorists being forced to
stop their cars as the wind rose to dangerous levels.  The force of the wind was enough to carry an I-beam about 16 feet long
some 200 feet from the former Glacier root beer stand a mile north of Union, into a field across the road at the Fetting farm.  
Damage in this area seemed to begin at the Elmer and Donald Allen farm west of Evansville on Emery road with roof damage to
one barn and another knocked down.  The storm went east wrecking Bob Antes’ coon pens and injuring a dog.  At the Buttchen
farm on West Union road it toppled a machine shed on a tractor.  The Butts Corners School was badly damaged with part of the
roof gone and the building moved several inches off its foundation.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Joint funeral services were held last Friday, Nov. 13, for Mr. and Mrs. William M. Heffel, Beloit, who suffered
fatal injuries in an auto accident two miles south of Orfordville on Hwy. 213 on Tuesday evening.  Funeral services were held in
the Cooksville Lutheran Church with burial in the church cemetery.

30 Years Ago (1980):  John and Nancy Bryant returned to Evansville to open up Steverrea Pizza at 18 E. Main.  They used to run
the East Side Grocery before selling it two years ago.  Since then they lived in Janesville.  The store was named after their
grandson, Steve, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Steve and Georgia Nieman.  The Bryants came back to Evansville so that their son,
Dale, 17, would finish school here.

20 Years Ago (1990):  “Mirror, Mirror On The Wall Who Is The Greatest Of Them All” is this year’s Evansville Drama Department’s
one-act play production.  The cast includes Jenny Moe, Deejay Redders, Melissa Wadsworth, Jenny Neuenschwander, Jeff
Fredendall, Nancy Strassburg, Stephanie Ross, Rachel Mackie, Libby Kress and Amy Fredendall.  Tony Walker is the Assistant
Director and Peter Diedrich is the Director.  The play is being performed as part of the Wisconsin High School Forensics
Association’s fall play contest.  The cast will perform at the Sectional level this Saturday at UW-Parkside in Kenosha.

10 years ago (2000):  A record number of voters turned out to do their civic duty in Tuesday’s presidential election.  In Evansville
a record 1,751 ballots were cast.  In the Town of Union, there was also a record turnout, with 920 ballots cast.  


In Review
Fourth Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Married In Evansville, Nov. 23, 1870, by Rev. E. Spalding, Mr. Reuben Palmer to Mrs. Sophia Brown, all
of Evansville.

130 Years Ago (1880):  The arrangement for holding Thanksgiving services having become a little confused, it has been left for
the Review to straighten out.  From old files of the Review, we find in 1878 services where held in the Congregational Church in
the usual manner.  For 1879, services by Rev. C. E. Goldthorp, in the Baptist church.  In the order of rotation that has heretofore
been adopted, services this year will be held in the Free Baptist Church.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. C. H. Wilder has sold his lumber business to Messrs. Brittingham and Hixon of Madison, including
stock and buildings.  [Wilder’s lumberyard was on the present grounds of the Nelson Young Lumberyard.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  The soft weather of the past week has put tobacco in case.  The warehouses will soon be open,
furnishing employment for many.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Lloyd Klusmeyer, of this city, who was a contestant in the dairymen’s buttermakers convention in Chicago
a few weeks ago, stood third in a class of 600 with a record of 94.83.  This is a splendid showing and indicates great expertness
and knowledge in one of the most important branches of Wisconsin’s diversified industries.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  A recital by the music class of Miss Pauline Geary was given at the Library Hall last Saturday afternoon.  
Those who took part were Thelma Roberts, Vivian Stair, Boyd Jones, Ruth Francis, Alice Davis, Margaret McKinney, Margaret
Elert, Edna Usher, Frederic Wadsworth, Phyllis Usher, Willie Ware, Fern Williams, Agnes Jensen, Luella Litch, George Skelstead,
Evelyn George, Mildred Litch, Helen Butts, Lawrence Shrafenberg, Blanche Jones, Evelyn Anderson, Dorothy Magee, Leonard
Wartzook, Anna Murphy, Elizabeth Fellows, Pearl Black.

80 Years Ago (1930):  At its regular weekly dinner and business meeting in the Hotel Central Monday night, the Evansville Lions
Club decided to follow its usual custom in erecting a large municipal Christmas tree at the corner of Madison and Main Streets.  
The tree will be decorated with Christmas bells, tinsel, and wreaths as in former years and will be illuminated with more than 100
colored lights.  The various committees have been named as follows:  decoration, Lester Bullard, Arthur Devine, and R. P.
Richardson; erecting of the tree, Fred Brunsell, Phil Pearsall, and Ray Smith.

70 Years Ago (1940):  For the convenience of southern Wisconsin farmers, the Baker Manufacturing company has opened a
retail store here at 150 East Church Street in the building formerly occupied by the firm’s general office.  The retail division in
charge of E. B. Knappenberger, manager, and Carroll Bly, assistant, will maintain a complete stock of pumping equipment
together with a repair and replacement department.  In converting the office building into the retail division, accommodations have
been made for a display room in which Baker products are exhibited.  Another room houses the replacement stock.  Repair work,
for the most part, is being done at the new branch.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. Fred Luchsinger and daughter Shirley moved into their new home on Garfield Avenue last
week.  Mr. and Mrs. Will Sumner and daughter have purchased the Luchsinger house on the corner of Garfield Avenue and North
First Street and have moved here.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  John Wilde reported to the Evansville Board of Education on his meeting with the Brodhead School Board
concerning the disposal of the Gardner school.  The school is to be sold at public auction by the Brodhead School district and
then the assets will be divided in proportion to the equalized valuation of the land taken in from said school district.  It was decided
to discuss with Orfordville the sale of the Drew School property and arrange for settlement when the Board meets with
Orfordville.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Although several meetings of the Teamsters Local 579 of Janesville and the Evansville Board of Education
have been held, no wage settlement has been reached.  The Board refused to accept the latest offer made by the union.  The
offer calls for an increase to $2.80 an hour for all male custodians with the exception of the head custodian for whom they are
requesting $660 per month.  The present wage scale ranges from $2.08 to $2.48 per hours for all male custodians.  The union is
asking for $2.25 an hour for the female custodian, who is presently receiving $1.54 per hour.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Last Saturday, the sectional contest was held at Lake Geneva and the One Act play, “The Diary of Adam
and Eve”, received three advance ratings and has been invited to perform at the State Drama Festival in Stevens Point on Dec. 5
and 6.  This is the third year in a row that Evansville has been invited to participate at the State Drama Festival.  “The Diary of
Adam and Eve” directed by Ted Moskonas and Pam Wilson, starts Margo Losey as Eve and George Wollinger as Adam, with Sue
Brunsell playing the part of the snake.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Chief of Police Chuck DiPiazza reminds citizens of the City Ordinance on discharging firearms within the
city limits.  This information is regards to shotgun shells discovered in the park.  “I can’t believe it, but people are shooting at
geese in the park,” DiPiazza said.  

10 years ago (2000):  Just in time for the holidays, Radio Shack opened in Evansville on Thursday, November 17th, 2000.  The
store is located at 603 East Main Street.  Evansville’s newest business has been looking for the right spot in Evansville.  Janis
Ringhand, chairman of the Economic Development Committee, worked hard to make the arrangement possible.  Dan Hanson,
franchise for the business, also operates a Radio Shack in Stoughton.  
.


In Review
Last Week of November - First Week of December 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Thanksgiving day marked no uncommon event in the history of Evansville.  Union services were held in
the Methodist church, a full house in attendance.  Sermon by Rev. Mr. R. W. Bryan of the Free Will Baptist Church, A New
Civilization.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Married at the residence of the bride’s mother on Church Street on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25th 1880 by
Rev. E. Robinson, A. A. Beebe agent of the C. & N. W. R. R. of Kendall, Wisconsin & Miss Cora Bell Bucklin, of Evansville.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The Thanksgiving supper and entertainment in the hall last Thursday evening was a grand success both
financially and otherwise.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Rev. Ranson Dunn, founder of the Free Will Baptist church in this city died.  It was Dr. Dunn, who is 1854,
raised the money to build the Free Will Baptist Church in this city and preached the dedicatory sermon.  Rev. M. C. Miner
preached a memorial sermon in the church for Rev. Dunn.  Editor, C. Ancil Libby and his brother William were some of the few
who remembered Dr. Dunn and the building of the Free Will Baptist Church here.  [Note:  the Free Will Baptist Church is now the
home of Grace Baptist Church in Evansville]

100 Years Ago (1910):  Tiger Bill’s and Col. G. W. Hall’s shows returned from their southern tour Sunday morning to remain in
their home quarters here for the winter.  They had eight cars packed with animals and circus paraphernalia, and in their wide
journeying have met with only two mishaps—the loss of a mule killed by the cars, and the death of a valuable horse in a street car
accident in Mobile, Alabama.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  There was a gathering of the salesmen of the Baker Manufacturing Company to attend the annual
conference of the salesmen and department heads.  There will be two sessions each day, wherein business conditions will be
discussed and plans laid for the coming year.  There are eighteen salesmen present this year and as new business conditions
are confronting them and the company the coming year, the meetings are likely to be of exceptional interest.  The company will
host the entire force of the shops, the traveling salesmen and heads of departments from this city and from their branches at the
parlors of the Congregational Church.  There will be an interesting program at this banquet and several toasts will be responded
to.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Heffel & Jorgensen advertise the new Chevrolet six standard sedan at $535.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Edward Hall, engineer at the plant of the Baker Manufacturing Company started something in Evansville
when he blew the company’s whistle at 1:20 p.m. Saturday.  He opened the 1940-41 activities of the Evansville Boy Scout Troop,
for one thing, and for another he summoned an emergency scout mobilization for an imaginary wash-out of the dam and locks at
Lake Leota.  


60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. John Wilde have returned from New York City where they attended the opening of an exhibit
on Nov. 22 of 28 Wilde paintings.  This exhibit is hung in the Robert Isaacson Gallery in New York City.  Most of his pictures are
still life.  Mr. Wilde exhibits annually in New York City.  This past year he was named chairman of the Art Education Department at
the University of Wisconsin.  He has also attained full professorship at the University.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Frank Bender Sr., found he had quite a few friends when a group of neighboring farmers got together to
pick 55 acres of his corn.  Bender is in Mercy Hospital recovering from an operation.  Alan Goldsmith, Warren Sarow, Walter
Exley, Dick Krueger, Tom Templeton, John Bender, Nathan Kessler, Fred Kuelz and Frank Bender, Jr. worked in the fields.  Mrs.
Frank Bender Sr, Mrs. Max Robinson, Mrs. Fred Kuelz, and Mrs. Nathan Kessler served the workers lunch.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The Grange Store reported a weekend break-in which is now under investigation by the local police, as is
also a report from Mrs. Raymond miller that money was taken from her home during the weekend.  One of Evansville’s weekend
robberies has been solved by local police.  Two juveniles who entered the home of Mrs. Raymond Miller and stole a sum of
money have been apprehended and turned over to the county probation officers.  Officers are investigating the other break-ins
and hope to solve them at an early date.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Arden Butts, Evansville, received the American Farmer Degree, FFA’s highest degree of membership, in
the national Future Farmers of America convention held in Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 12-14.  Butts, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Allison Butts, Rte. 1, Evansville, was one of seven Evansville FFA members to attend the convention.  Others who attended were
Terry Morton, Tom Sarow, Pam Woodworth, Jeff George, Dana Spooner, Greg Van Thournout and advisor Ray Weigand.

20 Years Ago (1990):  With winter weather about to close in, the new building of the All ‘N One, located on S. Madison Street is
showing signs of what is to come.  The building is not planned to open until next year, but will now be winter proofed.

10 years ago (2000):  The City of Evansville’s Third Annual Volunteers Recognition Program was held at Evansville’s Blue Cross
Blue Shield Building.  The program recognized eleven volunteers:  Julie Hermanson (Community Service Award), Marcia Flood
(Senior Service Award), Nancy Kress (Lifetime of Service Award), Erin Frain (J. C. McKenna Middle School Award), Christia Hunt
(Chamber of Commerce Award), Zac Beaver (Youth Service Award – under 19), Mary Beaver (City Government Award), Carolyn
Mills (Levi Leonard Volunteer of the Year Award), Rich Banton (Youth Sport’s Program Award), Sandy Phillips (EHS Award) and
Jackie Trawicki (Youth Service Organizations Award.)



.
In Review
First Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  New Organization!  First National Bank of Evansville.  L. T. Pullen, President, I. M. Bennett, Cashier.  
Whereas by satisfactory evidence presented to the undersigned, it has been made to appear that The First National Bank of
Evansville, in the Village of Evansville, in the County of Rock and State of Wisconsin, has been duly organized under and
according to the requirements of the Act of Congress entitled “An Act to provide a National Currency, secured by a pledge of
United States bonds, and to provide for the circulation and redemption thereof” and has complied with the provisions of said Act
required to be complied with before commencing the business of banking under said act.  Now Therefore I, John Jay Knox, acting
Comptroller of the Currency, do hereby certify that “The First National Bank of Evansville”, in the County of Rock and State of
Wisconsin is authorized to commence the business of banking under the said act.  31st day of October, 1870.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  The Baker Manufacturing Co. have purchased the Delpheny lot, which joins the Company’s property on
the West and will at some future time erect buildings on it made necessary by the increase of business.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Simons is excavating beneath his building next to the bank and will fit up a barbershop to be occupied
by Johnny Johnson.  [Note:  Attorney H. N. Simons purchased the building at 4 East Main in 1889.  The G. A. R. Hall (Grand Army
of the Republic an organization of Civil War Veterans) was on the second floor.  A cigar store was on the main floor and the
barbershop in the basement.  This commercial building was razed in the late 1960s when U B & T expanded to the east.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  One of the largest and most enthusiastic political gatherings of the campaign occurred last Monday
afternoon when Hon. Robert M. LaFollette of Madison spoke from the rear of a palace car to five hundred persons.  His train was
over an hour late but the crowd all stayed to hear our to-be Governor.  The Evansville band discoursed some inspiring music and
Mr. LaFollette in turn laid down some facts of an interesting nature to all Republicans.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Friday evening, Nov. 11, in Magee’s opera house, the volunteer firemen of this city give a dance.  This
will be the 26th annual ball of the Evansville Fire Department.  Kneff and Hatch fine orchestra from Janesville will furnish the music
and before the dance will give a concert.   Let us remember our valiant firemen and their legitimate needs, and help them, at
least, to the extent of one or more tickets to their annual ball.  They are always ready to respond on the instant to your call.  Will
you not do something for them?  

90 Years Ago (1920): Last Monday, Custodian Fred wilder turned the water off the mains leading to Leonard park and officially
declared it closed for the season.  The park was appreciated this year by many of the tourists from other states as a camping and
a resting place on their way to the northern lakes.  The young people of this city appreciated the athletic field of the park and
hardly a day passed that some were not practicing either on the track or on the tennis court for some amateur events.   

80 Years Ago (1930):  J. C. Robinson and son have entered 13 head of Herefords and W. G. Miles 34 head of sheep in the
American Royal Livestock show to be held in Kansas City, Mo., Nov. 15 to 22.  Both breeders exhibited at the American Royal last
year adding several ribbons to their collections of previous years.  Phil and Harold Robinson and Walter and Arthur Templeton,
members of the Evansville 4-H club, and Dean and Lee George, of the Magnolia club, are entering lambs in the Junior Livestock
Show to be held in Madison next week and are expecting to enter their animals again at the International Livestock exposition to
be held at the Chicago stock yards Nov. 29 to Dec. 6.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  A vivid description of the well-known Chaunte Training field near Rantoul, Ill, where seven Evansville
youths have enlisted was given to the Review editor by Edwin Devine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Devine.  Upon leaving Evansville
early in September, Devine, in company with John Wall, Lloyd Schudda, and Jack Kennedy went direct to the air corps field
where, following registrations, they submitted to thorough physical and mental examinations and were later assigned to three
weeks of recruiting.  Other Evansville youths who had previously enlisted there were Ted Greenway, now stationed at March
Field, near Riverside, Calif; and Donavan Wall, who with Jack Kennedy is in the air mechanics division.  John Wall, Lloyd
Schudda, and Jacob Larsen, Jr., who enlisted later, are in the sheet metal training department.  Devine is in the clerical.  The
government has enlarged Chaunte Field from an encampment of about 4,000 men a year ago to a present enrollment of nearly
10,000.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. George Smith, residents of Evansville for 50 years, will observe their 53rd wedding
anniversary at their home here at 243 W. Main Street next Wednesday.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith were married Nov. 8, 1897 in
Oregon.  Mrs. Smith was formerly Cora Persons of Attica.  After coming to Evansville the Smiths resided on a farm south of the
city a few years and 30 years ago Mr. Smith and sons purchased a meat market here which he and his son Ray, operate now.  A
son, Harold, died 13 years ago.  Besides the son, Ray, the couple has a granddaughter, Mrs. Harold Beyers, Evansville and a
great granddaughter, Carol June Byers.

50 Years Ago (1960):  The Thirty-Second degree was awarded Thursday evening to a class of 47 candidates at the Masonic
Temple, Madison.  Rowland Straka was the only candidate from here.  Other members who attended were Ed Jorgensen, John
McElroy, Dick Deily, and Jay Brink.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Mr. and Mrs. George Wollinger, Sr., will observe their 40th wedding anniversary.  The former Anna
Linsmeier and George Wollinger, Sr. were wed on Nov. 4, 1930 at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church in Redwood Falls, Minn.  The
couple has farmed for many years in the Evansville area.  The couple has seven children, Mrs. John (Delores) Hein of Hales
Corners, Wis.; Mrs. Harold (Agnes) Neal, Footville, Wis.; George Wollinger, Jr., Evansville; Mrs. Robert (Helen Bennett,
Evansville; Mrs. William Bauman, Monroe; Cathy Wollinger, student at Whitewater college; and Donald Wollinger at home.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Clarence Franklin, who is 97 years young, recalls the first vote he cast 76 years ago.  The year was 1904,
when he was 21, and he voted for Teddy Roosevelt.  Today he still believes in voting, as evidence by his casting his ballot on
Tuesday in the presidential election.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Since Dave Wartenweiler began as building inspector for Evansville in 1986, the growth has been steadily
on the upswing.  The average new home is selling for a comparatively low $70,000 price tag in Evansville.  His figures reflect an
average of 10 new homes a year.  Home improvements, renovations and additions have been a big item too, bringing his yearly
inspections to an average of 117.  

10 years ago (2000):  R. G. Huston Company, Inc., Cottage Grove, was granted the site grading contract with the Evansville
Community School District for the new high school site.  Huston’s bid, at a stunningly low $393,895, was 17.25% lower than the
number two bidder, Rock Road Companies, out of Janesville.  


In Review
Second Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  We want a good, faithful, industrious boy to learn the type-setting business.  None but one of steady
habits need apply.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Johnson & Stevens Bros. shipped seven car loads of stock; they have bought in the last few days 12,000
lbs. of wool, 10,000 lbs. delivered yesterday.  The lot contained one clip of 3,000 lbs.

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. Caleb Snashall is home to vote.  He is having more tenement buildings built upon his lots near
Chicago.  Mr. A. C. Gray of this place who has lots adjoining Mr. Snashall’s in the big city, will soon commence having similar
buildings erected upon them.

110 Years Ago (1900):  The whole number of votes cast were 534 of which McKinley received 411, Bryan 79 and Wooley 44.  
The telephone and telegraph news came promptly and accurately.  Almeron Eager’s joy at the 4,000 Republican majority in Rock
county and the 110,000 Republican majority in Wisconsin caused him to rush to the telephone and order two barrels of apples
sent up to the place of rejoicing.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  The bowling alley in the opera house block was opened Monday night.  Everything is in good shape for
players of this healthful and muscle-producing game and the old patrons have begun to get ready for the sport, while the new
ones are coming on apace.

90 Years Ago (1920):  The basket social at Pleasant Prairie schoolhouse Friday night was a success in every way.  A fine
program was given by the pupils.  The quilt was drawn by Ray Rasmussen, and nearly $90 was taken in from the sale of baskets
and tickets for quilts.

80 Years Ago (1930):  “A Sure Cure for Falsehood”, a one act comedy, was presented by Carroll Bly, Robert Dalton, and Walter
Spratler, members of the Evansville Young Men’s Club, at a joint meeting of county Y.M.C.A. board members from Green and
Rock counties held Monday night in Orfordville.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Football letters were presented to 21 prominent high school athletes by Coach George O’Neil.  Seniors
receiving letters were Kenneth Haakenson, Gordon Jorgensen, Bob Bovre, Bob Gibbs, Marvin Devlin, Bruce Townsend, Alwyn
Utzig, Ken Wall and Judd Pearsall.  Underclassmen honored were Haaken Haakenson, Donald Hartin, Arthur Sands, Carl Weaver,
Donald Graham, John Spanton, Bob Hurd, Russell Nihart, Stanley Haakenson, Rolland Bowen and Clifford Sarow.  The manager’
s letter went to Wally Erdman.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Evansville residents have been listening to chimes twice each day and many are still wondering where the
sweet music is coming from.  The chimes, installed in the Congregational Church on trial, are being played twice daily by Mrs. C.
A. Richmond.  Donations to a chimes fund are being received by the Rev. Mr. Richmond, which will eventually insure the
installation of a set.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Evansville voters turned out in near record number Tuesday, casting 1,400 valid ballots in the
gubernatorial race and 1,395 valid ballots in the presidential contest.  In the president contest, the Nixon-Lodge ticket beat out
Kennedy-Johnson by a 905 to 487 margin.  In the contest for governor Phillip Kuehn got 850 to 550 for Gov. Gaylord Nelson.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Harry E. Roderick, an official of the National Office of Civil Defense in the Pentagon, is the author of an
article on civil defense operational communications problems which was published in the October 1970 issue of Signal magazine.  

30 Years Ago (1980):  Dr. Sheila Sorkin, daughter of Mrs. Hannah Sorkin and the late Dr. Samuel S. Sorkin, who served
Evansville for so many years, will be opening her practice in Evansville shortly.  Her office will be located on E. Main Street, in the
building owned by Dr. Ed. Krueger at 115 East Main.  Dr. Sorkin will be a General Practitioner.

20 Years Ago (1990):  The Evansville water tower, located on the east side of town is now completed and this week will be filled
with water for testing.  The tower will be painted in the spring, as the weather is now too cold.  The tower was finished in very good
time.

10 years ago (2000):  The employees at the Evansville Post Office celebrated the retirement of Art Harnack.  Harnack celebrated
his last day on Fri. November 3.  Art has 33 years of postal work and 2 years of armed services time to complete a 35 year career.


In Review
Third Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Young “Thad” has chosen an artists’ profession.  He went to Chicago last week where he will take lessons
of experienced teachers, with intentions to make perspective drawing and painting a profession.  All who have seen Theodore’s
pencil sketches the past year or two, are convinced that he has selected a congenial profession.  There is not a young man of
better habits, purer morals, or one whom Evansville would delight to honor in any calling, more than Theodore Robinson.  If
health supports him a brilliant future lies within his reach.

130 Years Ago (1880):  A young man, lately working in Richardson’s barber shop had his ears frozen last Sunday, while walking
to Albany and back.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The Methodist Episcopal society held services in the basement of their church Sunday for the first time in
several weeks, on account of the addition being built.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Rev. Charles Merrill of Beloit, agent for the Children’s Home Society of Wisconsin, spent last Saturday
and Sunday in this city.  Mr. Merrill comes to Evansville at least once a year for the purpose of finding good homes in which to
place homeless children, also to care for any children in this city that are without homes.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  George Wolfe is putting in a drain ditch on his property in the rear of Meyers Bros. lumber yard.  Skilled
ditchers with their automatic ditching plow are doing the work with the intelligent assistance of sixteen horses, eight of whom rest
while their mates laboriously turn the capstan which coils the long reach of wire rope which pulls the gigantic plow nearer and ever
nearer to the end of its deep and wide furrow.  The outlet will join issues with Allen’s creek, so that Mr. Wolfe is advantageously
located to successfully drain his marsh and bring it to a high state of productivity.  [Note:   George Wolfe owned land north of the
present Nelson Young Lumber Yard.  Wolfe’s land extended east from Allen’s Creek and the railroad tracks.  His property
included part of the marsh on the east side of today’s Union Street.]

90 Years Ago (1920):  Cassius C. Howard was born September 20, 1845, in Herkemerr County, New York, moving to Wisconsin
with his parents in 1848, settling in Magnolia, where he lived until 1900, at that time moving to Madison, having been appointed
Messenger Clerk in the office of the State Board of Control; being appointed to that office by Governor La Follette.  His health
failing him, in 1908, he resigned and moved to Evansville, where he has since made his home.  Mr. Howard served in the Civil
War as a member of the Forty-second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.  He was married to Mary A. Robson of Magnolia, January 1,
1867, she departing this life, September 4, 1916. To this union was born two children, Jesse M. Gillman of this city and Howard of
Madison.  Mr. Howard answered the last roll call last Tuesday at the home of his daughter Mrs. Fred Gillman. The interment will
be in Maple Hill Cemetery this afternoon, the Rev. William Bird, of Magnolia, officiating.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The new basement of the Cooksville Lutheran Church will be dedicated at a special ceremony to be held in
the church at 1:30 p.m. Sunday.  The basement has been remodeled into church parlors at a cost of about $3,700 and has been
equipped with a water system, electric lights, chairs, dishes, kitchen utensils, silverware, furnace and curtains.  The dedication will
be given by Right Reverend Joseph M. Green, bishop of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Kenneth Morrison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Morrison, 430 Almeron Street, has recently been graduated
from the apprentice training course conducted by the Baker Manufacturing Company.  He is the first of the apprentices
indentured in the Baker company to complete the course.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  About 400 Evansville Citizens and guests attended the football banquet here in the school gym
Wednesday night at which Rolland Barnum, formerly of Evansville and former athletic star at the U. W. was the principal speaker.  
The banquet was given in honor of the 1950 team which finished as co-champions for the season in the Rock Valley League.  Co-
Captains were Randy Feldt and David Fellows.  Coach David Demichei and assistant coach Bill Hinze were presented with
jackets.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  A violent windstorm did many thousands of dollars worth of damage west and north of Evansville about 5:
45 Tuesday afternoon.  The storm did extensive damage throughout southern Wisconsin, with many motorists being forced to
stop their cars as the wind rose to dangerous levels.  The force of the wind was enough to carry an I-beam about 16 feet long
some 200 feet from the former Glacier root beer stand a mile north of Union, into a field across the road at the Fetting farm.  
Damage in this area seemed to begin at the Elmer and Donald Allen farm west of Evansville on Emery road with roof damage to
one barn and another knocked down.  The storm went east wrecking Bob Antes’ coon pens and injuring a dog.  At the Buttchen
farm on West Union road it toppled a machine shed on a tractor.  The Butts Corners School was badly damaged with part of the
roof gone and the building moved several inches off its foundation.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Joint funeral services were held last Friday, Nov. 13, for Mr. and Mrs. William M. Heffel, Beloit, who suffered
fatal injuries in an auto accident two miles south of Orfordville on Hwy. 213 on Tuesday evening.  Funeral services were held in
the Cooksville Lutheran Church with burial in the church cemetery.

30 Years Ago (1980):  John and Nancy Bryant returned to Evansville to open up Steverrea Pizza at 18 E. Main.  They used to run
the East Side Grocery before selling it two years ago.  Since then they lived in Janesville.  The store was named after their
grandson, Steve, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Steve and Georgia Nieman.  The Bryants came back to Evansville so that their son,
Dale, 17, would finish school here.

20 Years Ago (1990):  “Mirror, Mirror On The Wall Who Is The Greatest Of Them All” is this year’s Evansville Drama Department’s
one-act play production.  The cast includes Jenny Moe, Deejay Redders, Melissa Wadsworth, Jenny Neuenschwander, Jeff
Fredendall, Nancy Strassburg, Stephanie Ross, Rachel Mackie, Libby Kress and Amy Fredendall.  Tony Walker is the Assistant
Director and Peter Diedrich is the Director.  The play is being performed as part of the Wisconsin High School Forensics
Association’s fall play contest.  The cast will perform at the Sectional level this Saturday at UW-Parkside in Kenosha.

10 years ago (2000):  A record number of voters turned out to do their civic duty in Tuesday’s presidential election.  In Evansville
a record 1,751 ballots were cast.  In the Town of Union, there was also a record turnout, with 920 ballots cast.  


In Review
Fourth Week of November 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Married In Evansville, Nov. 23, 1870, by Rev. E. Spalding, Mr. Reuben Palmer to Mrs. Sophia Brown, all
of Evansville.

130 Years Ago (1880):  The arrangement for holding Thanksgiving services having become a little confused, it has been left for
the Review to straighten out.  From old files of the Review, we find in 1878 services where held in the Congregational Church in
the usual manner.  For 1879, services by Rev. C. E. Goldthorp, in the Baptist church.  In the order of rotation that has heretofore
been adopted, services this year will be held in the Free Baptist Church.  

120 Years Ago (1890):  Mr. C. H. Wilder has sold his lumber business to Messrs. Brittingham and Hixon of Madison, including
stock and buildings.  [Wilder’s lumberyard was on the present grounds of the Nelson Young Lumberyard.]

110 Years Ago (1900):  The soft weather of the past week has put tobacco in case.  The warehouses will soon be open,
furnishing employment for many.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Lloyd Klusmeyer, of this city, who was a contestant in the dairymen’s buttermakers convention in Chicago
a few weeks ago, stood third in a class of 600 with a record of 94.83.  This is a splendid showing and indicates great expertness
and knowledge in one of the most important branches of Wisconsin’s diversified industries.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  A recital by the music class of Miss Pauline Geary was given at the Library Hall last Saturday afternoon.  
Those who took part were Thelma Roberts, Vivian Stair, Boyd Jones, Ruth Francis, Alice Davis, Margaret McKinney, Margaret
Elert, Edna Usher, Frederic Wadsworth, Phyllis Usher, Willie Ware, Fern Williams, Agnes Jensen, Luella Litch, George Skelstead,
Evelyn George, Mildred Litch, Helen Butts, Lawrence Shrafenberg, Blanche Jones, Evelyn Anderson, Dorothy Magee, Leonard
Wartzook, Anna Murphy, Elizabeth Fellows, Pearl Black.

80 Years Ago (1930):  At its regular weekly dinner and business meeting in the Hotel Central Monday night, the Evansville Lions
Club decided to follow its usual custom in erecting a large municipal Christmas tree at the corner of Madison and Main Streets.  
The tree will be decorated with Christmas bells, tinsel, and wreaths as in former years and will be illuminated with more than 100
colored lights.  The various committees have been named as follows:  decoration, Lester Bullard, Arthur Devine, and R. P.
Richardson; erecting of the tree, Fred Brunsell, Phil Pearsall, and Ray Smith.

70 Years Ago (1940):  For the convenience of southern Wisconsin farmers, the Baker Manufacturing company has opened a
retail store here at 150 East Church Street in the building formerly occupied by the firm’s general office.  The retail division in
charge of E. B. Knappenberger, manager, and Carroll Bly, assistant, will maintain a complete stock of pumping equipment
together with a repair and replacement department.  In converting the office building into the retail division, accommodations have
been made for a display room in which Baker products are exhibited.  Another room houses the replacement stock.  Repair work,
for the most part, is being done at the new branch.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. Fred Luchsinger and daughter Shirley moved into their new home on Garfield Avenue last
week.  Mr. and Mrs. Will Sumner and daughter have purchased the Luchsinger house on the corner of Garfield Avenue and North
First Street and have moved here.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  John Wilde reported to the Evansville Board of Education on his meeting with the Brodhead School Board
concerning the disposal of the Gardner school.  The school is to be sold at public auction by the Brodhead School district and
then the assets will be divided in proportion to the equalized valuation of the land taken in from said school district.  It was decided
to discuss with Orfordville the sale of the Drew School property and arrange for settlement when the Board meets with
Orfordville.  

40 Years Ago (1970):  Although several meetings of the Teamsters Local 579 of Janesville and the Evansville Board of Education
have been held, no wage settlement has been reached.  The Board refused to accept the latest offer made by the union.  The
offer calls for an increase to $2.80 an hour for all male custodians with the exception of the head custodian for whom they are
requesting $660 per month.  The present wage scale ranges from $2.08 to $2.48 per hours for all male custodians.  The union is
asking for $2.25 an hour for the female custodian, who is presently receiving $1.54 per hour.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Last Saturday, the sectional contest was held at Lake Geneva and the One Act play, “The Diary of Adam
and Eve”, received three advance ratings and has been invited to perform at the State Drama Festival in Stevens Point on Dec. 5
and 6.  This is the third year in a row that Evansville has been invited to participate at the State Drama Festival.  “The Diary of
Adam and Eve” directed by Ted Moskonas and Pam Wilson, starts Margo Losey as Eve and George Wollinger as Adam, with Sue
Brunsell playing the part of the snake.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Chief of Police Chuck DiPiazza reminds citizens of the City Ordinance on discharging firearms within the
city limits.  This information is regards to shotgun shells discovered in the park.  “I can’t believe it, but people are shooting at
geese in the park,” DiPiazza said.  

10 years ago (2000):  Just in time for the holidays, Radio Shack opened in Evansville on Thursday, November 17th, 2000.  The
store is located at 603 East Main Street.  Evansville’s newest business has been looking for the right spot in Evansville.  Janis
Ringhand, chairman of the Economic Development Committee, worked hard to make the arrangement possible.  Dan Hanson,
franchise for the business, also operates a Radio Shack in Stoughton..


In Review
Last Week of November - First Week of December 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Thanksgiving day marked no uncommon event in the history of Evansville.  Union services were held in
the Methodist church, a full house in attendance.  Sermon by Rev. Mr. R. W. Bryan of the Free Will Baptist Church, A New
Civilization.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Married at the residence of the bride’s mother on Church Street on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25th 1880 by
Rev. E. Robinson, A. A. Beebe agent of the C. & N. W. R. R. of Kendall, Wisconsin & Miss Cora Bell Bucklin, of Evansville.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The Thanksgiving supper and entertainment in the hall last Thursday evening was a grand success both
financially and otherwise.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Rev. Ranson Dunn, founder of the Free Will Baptist church in this city died.  It was Dr. Dunn, who is 1854,
raised the money to build the Free Will Baptist Church in this city and preached the dedicatory sermon.  Rev. M. C. Miner
preached a memorial sermon in the church for Rev. Dunn.  Editor, C. Ancil Libby and his brother William were some of the few
who remembered Dr. Dunn and the building of the Free Will Baptist Church here.  [Note:  the Free Will Baptist Church is now the
home of Grace Baptist Church in Evansville]

100 Years Ago (1910):  Tiger Bill’s and Col. G. W. Hall’s shows returned from their southern tour Sunday morning to remain in
their home quarters here for the winter.  They had eight cars packed with animals and circus paraphernalia, and in their wide
journeying have met with only two mishaps—the loss of a mule killed by the cars, and the death of a valuable horse in a street car
accident in Mobile, Alabama.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  There was a gathering of the salesmen of the Baker Manufacturing Company to attend the annual
conference of the salesmen and department heads.  There will be two sessions each day, wherein business conditions will be
discussed and plans laid for the coming year.  There are eighteen salesmen present this year and as new business conditions
are confronting them and the company the coming year, the meetings are likely to be of exceptional interest.  The company will
host the entire force of the shops, the traveling salesmen and heads of departments from this city and from their branches at the
parlors of the Congregational Church.  There will be an interesting program at this banquet and several toasts will be responded
to.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Heffel & Jorgensen advertise the new Chevrolet six standard sedan at $535.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Edward Hall, engineer at the plant of the Baker Manufacturing Company started something in Evansville
when he blew the company’s whistle at 1:20 p.m. Saturday.  He opened the 1940-41 activities of the Evansville Boy Scout Troop,
for one thing, and for another he summoned an emergency scout mobilization for an imaginary wash-out of the dam and locks at
Lake Leota.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Mr. and Mrs. John Wilde have returned from New York City where they attended the opening of an exhibit
on Nov. 22 of 28 Wilde paintings.  This exhibit is hung in the Robert Isaacson Gallery in New York City.  Most of his pictures are
still life.  Mr. Wilde exhibits annually in New York City.  This past year he was named chairman of the Art Education Department at
the University of Wisconsin.  He has also attained full professorship at the University.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Frank Bender Sr., found he had quite a few friends when a group of neighboring farmers got together to
pick 55 acres of his corn.  Bender is in Mercy Hospital recovering from an operation.  Alan Goldsmith, Warren Sarow, Walter
Exley, Dick Krueger, Tom Templeton, John Bender, Nathan Kessler, Fred Kuelz and Frank Bender, Jr. worked in the fields.  Mrs.
Frank Bender Sr, Mrs. Max Robinson, Mrs. Fred Kuelz, and Mrs. Nathan Kessler served the workers lunch.

40 Years Ago (1970):  The Grange Store reported a weekend break-in which is now under investigation by the local police, as is
also a report from Mrs. Raymond miller that money was taken from her home during the weekend.  One of Evansville’s weekend
robberies has been solved by local police.  Two juveniles who entered the home of Mrs. Raymond Miller and stole a sum of
money have been apprehended and turned over to the county probation officers.  Officers are investigating the other break-ins
and hope to solve them at an early date.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Arden Butts, Evansville, received the American Farmer Degree, FFA’s highest degree of membership, in
the national Future Farmers of America convention held in Kansas City, Missouri, Nov. 12-14.  Butts, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Allison Butts, Rte. 1, Evansville, was one of seven Evansville FFA members to attend the convention.  Others who attended were
Terry Morton, Tom Sarow, Pam Woodworth, Jeff George, Dana Spooner, Greg Van Thournout and advisor Ray Weigand.

20 Years Ago (1990):  With winter weather about to close in, the new building of the All ‘N One, located on S. Madison Street is
showing signs of what is to come.  The building is not planned to open until next year, but will now be winter proofed.

10 years ago (2000):  The City of Evansville’s Third Annual Volunteers Recognition Program was held at Evansville’s Blue Cross
Blue Shield Building.  The program recognized eleven volunteers:  Julie Hermanson (Community Service Award), Marcia Flood
(Senior Service Award), Nancy Kress (Lifetime of Service Award), Erin Frain (J. C. McKenna Middle School Award), Christia Hunt
(Chamber of Commerce Award), Zac Beaver (Youth Service Award – under 19), Mary Beaver (City Government Award), Carolyn
Mills (Levi Leonard Volunteer of the Year Award), Rich Banton (Youth Sport’s Program Award), Sandy Phillips (EHS Award) and
Jackie Trawicki (Youth Service Organizations Award.)


In Review
First Week of December 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  As the scholars were returning from school, in Mr. Blakesley’s District, on Wednesday last, a larger boy
caught a son of Mr. Ed. Blakely, from the back, around the arms, and in attempting to extricate himself, fell, breaking his arm at
the wrist.

130 Years Ago (1880):  The annual meeting of the trustees of the Evansville Seminary was held in Evansville, Wis., Nov. 24th.  I.
M. Bennett was elected president, J. G. Terrill, secretary, and L. T. Pullen, treasurer.  D. M. Sinclair was appointed special
financial agent and will shortly move to Evansville to enter upon the duties of his office.  The unpaid subscriptions are in his
possession.  The subscriptions now due should be forwarded to him at that place immediately, as the money is very much needed.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The country is full of tobacco buyers both local and foreign.  It is estimated that fully one half of the ’90
crop has changed hands during the past week at prices ranging from 5 to 10 cents per lb.

110 Years Ago (1900):  This is the beginning of the first week of the last month of the 19th century.  It should see some people
making some extra exertion in settling all small accounts with one another, so that when the 20th century is ushered in, no small
store bills and other book accounts will be carried from one century to another.

100 Years Ago (1910):  V. C. Holmes will move into his handsome new home on South First Street this week Saturday.  The
dwelling stands on a magnificent site commanding a comprehensive view of a wide stretch of country, and is said to be one of the
most substantial and elegant homes ever built in this locality.  Mr. and Mrs. Holmes are to be congratulated on their selection of
so choice a location on which to build their commodious and luxurious residence.  It is not only an ornament to the street, but a
matter of pride to every citizen who takes the right sort of interest in the growth and prosperity of the Banner City.  [Note:  Holmes’
house was at 443 South First and was years later the Leota School for Girls.]

90 Years Ago (1920):  The advocates of Woman’s Suffrage have ever contended that when woman voted she would stand for the
pure and good in politics, and condemn and cast out rottenness, graft and dirty political methods, regardless of what party used
them.  The women of Wisconsin at the elections a week from next Tuesday have the opportunity to either prove all that their
friends have claimed for their intelligence in the use of the ballot, or else the opponents of the rights of female suffrage will be
given an opportunity to say “We told you so.”

80 Years Ago (1930):  George W. Hall, 75, local circus veteran, died in the home of his son, Frank E. Hall, Whitewater, following a
lingering illness since an automobile collision more than a year ago.  Mr. Hall, a son of the late Col. George W. Hall, was born in
Massachusetts, first entering the show business at the age of four, when he traveled with his father.  After traveling with the
Ringling Brothers’ and Gollmar Brothers’ circuses for several years, he founded his own show, a wagon outfit consisting of 52
wagons, two elephants, four camels, and several cages of wild animals with headquarters in Evansville.  His three children, Frank,
Grace, and Russell all worked with the show until Mr. Hall retired 13 years ago.  Surviving are his three children, Frank Hall,
Whitewater; Mrs. Howard Bruce and Russell C. Hall, who are with their show in Oklahoma; and two sisters, Mrs. Walter Gollmar
and Mrs. William Campbell, this city.  His wife, Mrs. Lida Hall, died 13 years ago.

70 Years Ago (1940):  A transaction was completed wherein the Union Cooperative Association purchased from Green Brothers,
Janesville, the building at the corner of Church and Maple Streets formerly occupied by the Evansville Lumber Company.  The
Association plans to transfer its stock and equipment now housed at its bulk station on Union Street to the new quarters though
the storage tanks will not be transferred until Spring.  New gasoline pumps are being installed at the new location where an
automotive service station will be operated, and the flooring between the two drives in the large warehouse has been lowered to
facilitate the unloading of feeds from railroad cars.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Christmas stars are being painted this afternoon by the members of the Lions Club and it is expected they
will be put up next week, two stars on each light pole.

50 Years Ago (1960):  We have recently listed a three bedroom, nearly new house for only $10,000.  It has a gas furnace, large
bath and utility room combined, a large living room, and is insulated throughout.  TV Antenna stays.  The garage is real good
size.  Best part is taxes only $136.  “C.” Hyne, Realtor.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Danny Weaver, son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald weaver went to Nekoosa with his father last week to visit
relatives and do a little hunting.  Danny had recently purchased a new gun and a hunting license and was all prepared to shoot a
deer but was surprised and thrilled when it happened.  His deer was a three point animal.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Thus far three persons have indicated their intent to run for the upcoming school board vacancies.  Phil
Hamilton, presently on the board, states he will run again.  Mary Kettle, who ran unsuccessfully before has indicated she will be a
candidate.  Joe Bradley has also stated he will run, feeling there is a need for representation from the rural community.  

20 Years Ago (1990):  The blizzard which swept through Evansville, as well as a wide area of the state and Illinois, left residents
here hoping that the remaining 26 snows will not be of the magnitude of the one that started late Sunday night.  By noon Monday,
Madison was reporting 11 inches of snow, with a blizzard warning posted for their area and the central part of the state.  The
winds from the northeast, gusting up to 50 miles per hour, were to slowly diminish Monday night, but temperatures were
dropping.  More cold weather and snow was predicted for most of the week.

10 years ago (2000):  Work is underway on a blacktop road extending the current Weary Road north into the Morning Ridge
development.  The new road, under construction now, ties in with the roads such as Glacier and Woodworth.  Eventually Weary
Rd. will extend farther to the north.  The final plot approval and county and state approval will be needed.  John Morning is the
developer of this area.


In Review
Second Week of December 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Farmers have been running the plow briskly the past week.  There is not a particle of frost in the ground
this 6th day of December and the streams are free from ice.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Byron Andrews, an Evansville boy, and who is manager of the Washington Bureau of Correspondence
for the N. Y. Graphic, Cleveland Herald, Chicago Interocean, and St. Paul & Minneapolis Pioneer & Press, has been honored with
an appointment as member of the Inauguration Committee, to inaugurate President Garfield on the 4th of March next.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The pinnacles of the new towers to the M. E. church is being completed in fine style.  Mr. Harry Benny
has been doing some rather hazardous work upon them in covering them with galvanized iron.

110 Years Ago (1900):  A happy event which occurred last week was the wedding of Helga Julseth and Harold Brunsell, when
ninety guests assembled at the feast.  To them good speed and fair weather on their journey of life.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Carl Topp died at his home in the town of Center, Dec. 12, 1910, at the age of 70 years and five months.  
He leaves to mourn his loss, his wife, three sons, three daughters, two brothers and one sister.  The funeral services were held
Wednesday from the E. A. church, Rev. H. J. Kohlhepp as the officiating clergyman.

90 Years Ago (1920):  When the County Board of Supervisors meets in January and the county agent fight is carried onto the
floor, there will be a committee composed of George Hull, Chairman, and W. G. Patterson, Evansville, and William Lathers, Beloit,
to represent the interest of the Rock County Farm Bureau.  The executive committee was appointed to present the desires and
claims of the majority of farmers in Rock County who have been so pronounced in their desire to retain the agent by having the
County Board rescind its resolution to abolish the office next July.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Clarence Elmer, 22, narrowly escaped serious injuries at 5 p.m. Saturday when he fell from the roof of a
tobacco shed onto a hayrack, a distance of twelve feet, while at work on the Kenneth Dunbar farm, five miles northwest of the
city.  He was taken to St. Mary’s hospital, Madison, where an examination revealed no bones broken.  Mr. Elmer has been
employed by his brother, Walter Elmer, near the Dunbar farm.

70 Years Ago (1940):  The distinction of having a painting displayed in the famous Chicago Art Institute has come to Charles
Hazlett, Betsy Wolff, Gordon Lawry, Anne Pullen, John Meier, Betty Brown and Betty Keefe of the Evansville public schools.  Their
pictures were in a collection of children’s work show in the Blackstone Gallery.  The art work displayed was stimulated by the
broadcasts of “Let’s Draw” on the Wisconsin School of the Air.  Through music and story art is taught by radio.  James
Schwalbach of the State Teachers’ college, Whitewater prepares the programs for presentation.

60 Years Ago (1950):  Evansville merchants report that business has been at a lively pace.  One of the reasons is the large
stocks and exceptional values offered here.  The stores are open evenings and the business section has a Christmas-like
atmosphere.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Miss Sue Jones, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Jones, and Miss Kathleen George, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Glenn E. George, Brooklyn, who are enrolled at Prospect Hall, Secretarial School for girls in Milwaukee, will be at home with
their parents for the Christmas holidays.

40 Years Ago (1970):  On December 8, the sixth graders of the Third Street School had the pleasure of listening to Melvin Janes
talk of farming in Rock County.  His talk was very interesting.  He told of facts and figures, machinery and dangers, types of
methods of farming in Rock County.  Mr. Janes was invited to speak because the sixth graders are studying farming in Rock
County, the United States, and foreign countries in Social Studies.

30 Years Ago (1980):  Zurfluh’s Bar is under new ownership and this weekend they will be holding their grand opening.  The new
owner is Tom Reilly of Oregon.  [Note: Zurfluh’s Bar was at 6-8 East Main.  The building is now part of the Union Bank & Trust.]

20 Years Ago (1990):  Students at the J. C. McKenna Middle School tied yellow ribbons on trees in front of the school.  The
ribbon was sent to the school from Ft. McCoy.  During the recent middle School Concert, a candle was lighted and the names of
the following people in service was read:  Mike Schuster, Louie Kramer, Tuesday Morton, Denise Miller, Jeff Everson, Jeff
Lawrence, Mike Heritage, Brian Crull, Todd Hughes, Mark Haberman, Gary Martin, Mike Artis, Ken Nehls, Dennis McCaslin, Kelly
Linderman, Jenny Dunphy, Jason Jones, Dustin Hawkins, Arnie Rockstead and Bobbie Kjendlie.  

10 Years Ago (2000): A big snow storm hit Evansville and a wide area across southern Wisconsin and created blizzard conditions
in Chicago on Monday.  The snow began in the early morning hours and continued all day, piling up a good eight inches before
the predicted end late Monday night.  All area schools were closed Monday.  Tuesday the drifting was predicted to take place.  All
week, cold weather will prevail.


In Review
Third Week of December 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  Masonic – At a regular meeting of the Union Lodge, A. F. & A. M., held at their Hall, Dec. 19th, the
following were elected officers for the ensuing year:  J. W. Whitney, W. M.; M. W. Sheafe, S. W.; Matthew Bargewell, J. W.; Nelson
Winston, Treasurer; and J. M. Owen, Secretary.

130 Years Ago (1880):  Nineteen years ago Mr. Eager collected the tax of Union, which amounted to the gross sum of $4,300.  He
collects again this year but his list has swollen to over $12,000.  Why?  Has not our wealth increased with our liabilities?  With this
ratio of increase we shall have an enormous tax twenty years hence.

120 Years Ago (1890):  A fire Monday night, or rather half past twelve o’clock this morning burned a small unoccupied house on
Franklin street belonging to Wm. Wilson.  It was to have been occupied today.  It was undoubtedly set on fire.  Both fire
companies responded to the call of the fire bell but the fire was well under way when people got there, and no part of the house
was saved.  The property was worth about four hundred dollars.
  
110 Years Ago (1900):  Turkeys by the thousands are being delivered in this city.  Baldwin Bros. are doing a big poultry business,
having employed as high as seventeen pickers a day.  They have shipped about four thousand turkeys already.  

100 Years Ago (1910):  Evansville continues to expand commercially.  Through the efforts of the Commercial club there has been
secured for Evansville a new industry.  The company, to be known as the Evansville Manufacturing Company, is now being
formed to undertake the manufacture of light machinery, more particularly gasoline engines of a size suitable for general use on
the farm.   The active management will be in the hands of Mr. Frank Frost and Mr. Chester Morgan, both well known in
Evansville.  Mr. Frost was graduated as a mechanical engineer from the University of Wisconsin and has had several years of
practical design, construction and testing of gas engines.  Mr. Morgan has been engaged in general construction work.  For many
months these two young men have been trying out a new type of gas engine of their own invention and design.  For the present
the factory will be located in the Grange store warehouse, near the station.  

90 Years Ago (1920):  At the box social held by Miss Alice Milbrandt, teacher in the White Star school, a total of $62.30 was
raised.  The money will be used in the purchase of school supplies and repairs to the building.

80 Years Ago (1930):  The Christmas spirit reached its height in Evansville when the local Girl Scout troop, under the direction of
Miss Margaretta Roskie, kindergarten and music teacher, toured the city singing Christmas carols at all homes in which candles
had been placed in windows.  Miss Erna Schweppe, Miss Dorothy Schlatter, and Miss Evelyn Rodd are the leaders of the troop.

70 Years Ago (1940):  Joe McCaslin, son of Mr. and Mrs. George McCaslin, East Main Street left the city last month on a 3,500-
mile tour with the William B. Antes calliope which is a unit of the Thatcher-Stanbery traveling Christmas Pageantry parades.  

60 Years Ago (1950):  Robert Olsen has been called for service in the armed forces and will leave next Wednesday.

50 Years Ago (1960):  Glidden Libby, Evansville, is among 28 outstanding students in the University of Wisconsin School of
Pharmacy who have been presented with special grants and scholarships in pharmacy for the current school year.  Glidden is the
son of Dr. and Mrs. O. G. Libby.

40 Years Ago (1970):  Smoke discovered in the library Thursday afternoon provided a fire scare and a call to the Evansville Fire
Department.  The response was prompt and since there was no blaze the cause of the smoke was investigated.  The smoke flue
to the fireplace on the main floor was completely plugged and the smoke backed up into the room and caused the walls to get
hot.  There was no other damage but the timely investigation may have prevented a bad fire.

30 Years Ago (1980):  The dolls entered in the “Dress-a-Doll” contest were on display in the lobby of the Merchants Bank of
Evansville.  Grand prize winner was Floyce S. Herndon, Janesville.  First place winners were Kay Hay, knit and crochet; Paulette
Morning, character; Jean Helgesen, nationality; and Jane Miller, special class, 16 years old and younger.   Receiving honorable
mention were Sharmon Speich, Muriel Weber, and Edith Manke.  

20 Years Ago (1990):  Bob Berezowitz, formerly of Evansville, and coach of the UW-whitewater football team, has been named
Region 4 Coach of the Year for College Division II by the American Football Coaches Association.  The Whitewater Warhawks this
past season went 10-0.  This was their first unbeaten season since 1966.

10 years ago (2000):  The National Band Association has selected the Evansville High School Symphonic Band to perform at its
January 19, convention.  It is an honor for them to be selected.  Along with this honor comes financial obligations.  The
transportation for the group will be $800 to $900.  The group is required to perform in formal attire.  The group is also responsible
for designing and printing its own programs.  The cost has yet to be determined but local business sponsorship is hoped for.  If
unable to do this, the Music Boosters will provide assistance.  On Saturday, Jan. 6, there will be a dress rehearsal for the
Symphonic Band.  Music Boosters will coordinate a meal for students and their parents.  


In Review
Fourth Week of December 1870-2000

140 Years Ago (1870):  There  will be an entertainment for the benefit of the Baptist Sabbath School, at Treat’s Hall, on Friday
evening, Dec. 30th, commencing at 7 o’clock  The exercises will consist of a dramatic piece entitled “Aunt Dinah’s Pledge,” a
farce, “The Greatest Plague of Life, or Tipsey Pudding,” Illustrating the great evil of intemperance.  Several tableaux will be
performed and the whole interspersed with appropriate music, making the whole a pleasing and profitable entertainment.  

130 Years Ago (1880):  John Robinson is happy, the Emery family are happy; it’s a boy.

120 Years Ago (1890):  The dance at Magee’s Hall Thursday evening was largely attended and a happy good time enjoyed by
the younger people and some not so young.

110 Years Ago (1900):  Lyman Gillies, John Higday and Hugh Robinson who are attending the Madison Agricultural school came
home for the holidays.

100 Years Ago (1910):  Charlie, Herman and Albert Kleinsmith of Sheboygan and Will and August Kleinsmith of this place were
five brothers of the Kleinsmith family who have not met since the funeral of their father twenty-four years ago.

90 Years Ago (1920):  At the recent Farm Bureau meeting held in Union in connection with farmers from Porter and Magnolia, 75
men took the pledge to not use butter substitutes and only use pure butter to increase the use of milk products in order to cut
down the surplus which threatens the dairymen with loss.

80 Years Ago (1930):  Four Evansville couples whose weddings occurred a half century or more ago celebrate their
anniversaries here this month.  They are Mr. and Mrs. N. T. Slauson who observed their fifty-sixth anniversary on Christmas eve.  
Mr and Mrs. Eugene Harris who observed their sixty-first anniversary on Christmas day, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Beath, whose
golden wedding was Christmas day and Mr. and Mrs. William Porter who will celebrate their golden wedding December 30th.  

70 Years Ago (1940):  Christmas cheer was brought to many needy Evansville families this week when lodge, church and school
groups, as well as public spirited individuals distributed yuletide baskets and gifts throughout the city and surrounding rural
communities.  Aiding materially Evansville’s holiday relief projects was the food collected by the Rex Theatre which sponsored a
community gift matinee to which the admission charge for both adults and children was a contribution of a good item for an
unfortunate Evansville family.  The admissions received were turned over to Miss Ruth Chase, city nurse.

60 Years Ago (1950):  The home of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Brunsell on West Main Street won first honors in the 1950 Yule home
decorations contest sponsored by the Evansville Lions Club.  The home of Mr. and Mrs. Harley Smith on Grove Street was
awarded second honors and third prize went to the Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Teubert home on Third Street.  Many Evansville homes were
brilliantly lighted with Christmas trees inside and outside and lighted greens arranged over doorways and on the porches.  

50 Years Ago (1960):  Skating is excellent on Lake Leota.  The warming house will be open from 1 to 5:30 and from 7 to 10 p.m.
during the holiday vacation and after that from 4 to 5:30 and 7 to 10 pm. daily.

40 Years Ago (1970):  An evaluation of the trimester system now is being conducted, scheduled for completion in the 1971-72
school year.  A group of outside educators are scheduled to conduct the final evaluation in 1972 when the first group of students
will have completed four years under the trimester system.  Among consideration will be whether students are demonstrating
responsibility in terms of the way in which they utilize their time, the general atmosphere among teachers and students towards
trimesters, and a comparison on the progress of first-year college students having undergone trimester in high school.

30 Years Ago (1980):  A new veterinarian joined the staff at the Evansville Veterinary Service December 1.  Blaine Ellison of
Wheaton, IL took his pre-vet training at Iowa State and is a May 1980 graduate of the University of Ill. Vet School in Champaign.  
His special interest is in exotic birds and reptiles and has a pet Mexican red-legged tarantula named Roy.

20 Years Ago (1990):  Winners of the Jaycee Christmas House Decorating Contest were:  Judges’ choice, Rutkowski/Fisher, 114
West Main.  There were 44 entries.  Others winning prizes donated by local businesses were Gary Phillips, Luke Short, Joyce
Nelson, Deb Miller, Kelly House, Tom U’ren, J. Schoenenberger, David Klemp, Rick Malliet, John Wyse, Craig Nordness, Bill Alt,
Kathleen Spanton, Rod Vanderstelt and Tony Wyse.

10 years ago (2000):  Ben Herman, bass clarinet, and Joe Jakes, percussion, members of the high school band, have been
chosen to be members of the 17th Annual Wisconsin All State Band.  This select ensemble has membership of the leading
musicians from 50 schools throughout Wisconsin.  The students were chosen for this organization by their musical qualifications
and applications sent by their directors.